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Joined Jan 2, '13. Posts: 7 (14% Liked) Likes: 1

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  • Jan 4 '13

    Quote from nikkole318
    I am a new nurse who just got off orientation a few weeks ago. I have worked at the hospital where I am for more than a year and was hired from a tech position to a nurse once I passed my boards. I thought everything would go smoothly once I got off orientation, but I've been wrong so far. During orientation, I managed to make a lot of really stupid mistakes that I should have known better than to make, had numerous personality clashes with a couple of my preceptors, and got on my nurse educator's bad side.

    I know that people at work talk about me. I have heard it first hand and get the sense that people do not like me. Although some of it is unwarranted bullying, I realize that some of it is my fault as well. I take the blame because my problems with coworkers seem to follow me wherever I go. I have never had an easy time making friends at work and have always gotten the reputation for being stupid, lazy, etc... I guess what I am asking for is help. I realize that I can control how I present to other people.

    I am tired of being "that person." I need some tips on how to better my reputation and gain friends at work. I also need some words of encouragement. There is a girl at work who I know has spoke poorly about me to various people and I feel like as a result, these people now have a very negative opinion of me. I can tell by the knowing looks, sideways glances, and hushed whispers in the hall. I realize that I cannot control what other adults do, but these things have really put a beating on my self esteem. Any advice on how to not **** other nurses off, how not to look stupid, and how to overcome a bad reputation? Thanks!
    The first year after graduation is the hardest. School in NO WAY prepares you to be a nurse ....but I think you have already solved your own problem.
    problems with coworkers seem to follow me wherever I go. I have never had an easy time making friends at work and have always gotten the reputation for being stupid, lazy, etc...
    You need to take a really good, hard, honest look at your self. What are you doing to cause people to think that your are "lazy, stupid etc" If this was only here then I'd say bad co-workers....but you have recognized that this has happened before....so you need to look to you. What behaviors do you have that promote this image.

    You need to go to your manager/educator and tell them...you want to change. That you need a chance and guidance to become a better you and a better nurse for them. Set up an action plan....engege them in honest dialogue that you want to be better but need help. But do your part too!!! When you receive criticism or correction....you accept it with grace and poise and take the input gratefully and learn form it.

    Maybe look into counseling.....go to your facilities EAP (employee assistance program) and ask to speak to someone. Change you. Take a good hard honest look at yourself....and move forward. Think before you act and ask questions.

    One thing that may help you is to acknowledge that you don't know it all.......that you need help. Maybe you need some help with organization. I have several brain sheet that I share for AN members to use.......these may help. I wish you the best.

    mtpmedsurg.doc 1 patient float.doc‎
    5 pt. shift.doc‎
    finalgraduateshiftreport.doc‎
    horshiftsheet.doc‎
    report sheet.doc‎
    day sheet 2 doc.doc

    critical thinking flow sheet for nursing students
    student clinical report sheet for one patient

  • Jan 4 '13

    OMG you are not stupid, you've only been on the job for 3 weeks. If everyone could be perfect 100% their fist day we would have a utopia society.

    I say work EXTRA hard, like push off breaks and ALWAYS look busy. Never stand around and if there's nothing to do... clean or talk to/serve the patients. Probably though, there is ALWAYS going to be something to do. I heard that the best work is work which is not noticed, meaning, you do it without being asked once you've learned how to do it under supervision. If you see it needing to be done and you've already learned how to do it, do it, without the co-workers supervision. Keep doing this until you are nearly 100% on your own. Your boss will LOVE not having to watch you and you'll change your rep from being "new" to "hard worker and best of all, GOOD worker."

    I say work way up to down in terms of getting along with co-workers. The boss/ your preceptor director is the PRIORITY. Win their love first and you will win the other's loves too. In a conversation take their side... but try not to alienate the co-worker either. It's about balance and being friendly, but usually, "the boss is always right" . Co-workers like, actually, the co-workers which get along great with the boss because they want to get on their good side too. good luck! (and ignore the people who say it is your problem, psych ect., this doesn't really help at all guys... being the perfect worker and figuring out everything takes time )

    Hope this helps!!!!

    Quote from nikkole318
    I am a new nurse who just got off orientation a few weeks ago. I have worked at the hospital where I am for more than a year and was hired from a tech position to a nurse once I passed my boards. I thought everything would go smoothly once I got off orientation, but I've been wrong so far. During orientation, I managed to make a lot of really stupid mistakes that I should have known better than to make, had numerous personality clashes with a couple of my preceptors, and got on my nurse educator's bad side. I know that people at work talk about me. I have heard it first hand and get the sense that people do not like me. Although some of it is unwarranted bullying, I realize that some of it is my fault as well. I take the blame because my problems with coworkers seem to follow me wherever I go. I have never had an easy time making friends at work and have always gotten the reputation for being stupid, lazy, etc... I guess what I am asking for is help. I realize that I can control how I present to other people. I am tired of being "that person." I need some tips on how to better my reputation and gain friends at work. I also need some words of encouragement. There is a girl at work who I know has spoke poorly about me to various people and I feel like as a result, these people now have a very negative opinion of me. I can tell by the knowing looks, sideways glances, and hushed whispers in the hall. I realize that I cannot control what other adults do, but these things have really put a beating on my self esteem. Any advice on how to not **** other nurses off, how not to look stupid, and how to overcome a bad reputation? Thanks!

  • Jan 4 '13

    Stop making stupid mistakes (a COUPLE of times?? How do they know you'll never make that mistake again? You did it more than once already!), stop ******* people off, and think a lot less about your self-esteem than how damn dangerous they think you are, apparently with good reason.



    Whoa. Stop right there, GrnTea.

    Your first comment: very helpful. Informative, insightful, etc.

    The vitriol of your second comment, however, completely undoes the good you did with the first. This new RN has come here, hat in hand, very honest and vulnerable, bravely asking for help and advice. What you offered is basically verbal and emotional abuse.

    You know what? What you say MATTERS. The energy you put forth in the world with your intent and your words has an impact.

    Seriously, you never made ANY mistakes? From your comments, I am guessing that you have, and that you were even harder on yourself about them than this new RN.

    This is more a conduct issue for me than the use of the word *** in an earlier post that offended someone.

    Just sayin'.

  • Jan 4 '13

    IMO you are being too critical of yourself & you are allowing others to control you. You can't care if others choose to listen to other people, rather than using their own eyes & ears. It doesn't matter where you work or what profession you are in, these negative people are everywhere. Did you have any medical office experience outside of nursing school? I'm asking cause when I started out as a MA, I made a lot of silly mistakes as I was new to the profession. I even wrote my name as the patients name on an MRI requisition. LOL....I was young, NEW & I was busy, so I was preoccupied. Don't be so hard on yourself & learn as much as you can. IMO just being here & being honest, shows your dedication to being a good nurse & I think you will do great!! As far as the PP asking about having a psych eval? Seriously? Maybe she's just nervous? Don't jump so quickly to the negative.

  • Jan 4 '13

    I know he is a nurse because he wears the same scrubs that I see when I go to that hospital (I'm an EMT). Like you said, you've had some obvious yuckkies on you and sometimes are unaware of stains left behind, so how would I know if the ones he was wearing were clean? He could have just gotten off work and gone straight to the gym in those. I do not mind seeing a hospital worker going to the grocery market or whatever after their shift was over, but going to the gym and lying down on the same bench where I would be lying is a different story.

  • Jan 4 '13

    Im not sure if hospitals have standing orders or not but most LTC's in my area have SHO for O2

  • Jan 4 '13

    This is my first time on this website. I will be starting Nursing 2 on January 22. I am finding this very helpful and hope to see more questions and answers like this to help me along my journey.

  • Jan 4 '13

    I am presuming that this is a NCLEX test question... your priority nursing intervention is 2-3 L/M O2 via NC.

    One of the above posters is correct that O2 is a drug, which requires a physicians order to administer. However (in the realm of the NCLEX) if you selected notify the physician (to obtain an order), you would get this question wrong as you are delaying care.

    Additionally, you must auscultate the patient to ensure that adequate ventilation is present.

    COPD pt's will tend to run on the HTN side of the house due to chronic arteriolar vasoconstriction, along with concurrent pulmonary HTN.



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