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IndiCRNA 5,908 Views

Joined: Nov 22, '12; Posts: 120 (63% Liked) ; Likes: 274
CRNA; from US
Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience in ICU, transport, CRNA

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  • Apr 30

    Quote from mayahp22
    Yea that's what I've heard. Thanks for the advice. Do you suggest any classes to take to make your application competitive like biochem or any other grad level coursework?
    I really struggled with physics and wished I had taken an entry level class before attempting aneshthesia school. I wouldn't have taken it for credit but just to get some background. As for grad classes I would just pick one that sounds difficult from the program you wish to attend so that is counts twords your degree and lightens your load while in the program. Getting accepted is no big deal. In fact I have never known anyone who applied and didn't get accepted, though I have known a few who had to apply twice.

  • Mar 26

    Quote from BigcatchRN
    Thanks for your response Indi! I do have about 1 year of experience in intense Level 1 Trauma SICU but that was from a few years ago; I have since moved and now work a variety of ICU's through float pool but it is more community hospital level. I know that's not going to cut it to make my experience very competitive, but I plan to use the 1.5 years I probably have at a minimum before starting CRNA school to build more experience at a "sicker" SICU. The only thing holding me back now is the prospect of giving up my float pay
    : (
    Hey man forget your float pay. I intentionaly went to work in a very low paying hospital specificaly cause I know that nurses from that unit get accepted to CRNA school at very high rates. I make about $60K less working at that hospital than I could have in a different hospital 3 hours away. However that unit got me into CRNA school and I have WAY WAY more than made up the difference. You wouldn't even believe me if I told you how much I make now.
    I am 1/3 owner of an all CRNA practice. The 3 of us have the exclusive contract to provide anesthesia services of a smaller hospital. That means we get 100% of the bill rate for services. Our schedual is PERFECT. It goes like this. For two weeks I work mon-fri 6-8 hours a day doing schedualed cases. No call, no nights, no weekends. Then for two weeks I go on call 24/7 but have no schedualed cases. On average I work 15 hours a week during those 2 weeks but I am on call all the time. Usually I am called in for night OB cases and for trauma in the ER, and emergency cases. Fun stuff. We also provide on call intensivist coverage for the small ICU. That means I take calls at night to deal with issues with the ICU patients. We also run all the vents after hours. It sounds like a lot but it's not really and it's the only thing I have to do for those 2 weeks. I take call from home. I own a farm that I am setting up for hunting and I get a lot of work done and get in a lot of fishing during those two weeks. Then for two weeks I am OFF! So I get 2 weeks off out of every 6 weeks. Our schedual rotates like that in 6 week blocks.
    All the income figures for CRNAs you see are for employees. I am the junior partner of our 3 CRNA group and I will make more than $300K in my first year. The senior partner makes over half a million. I expect to make over half a million within 5 years. We are NOT supervised by physicians in any way. We ARE the anesthesia department. We write orders on our patients and follow them so long as they are in the ICU or PACU. We are in negotiations right now to take over the pain managment service. That will add minimal work but a lot of income. We recently hired a CRNA to cover baby leave by one of the partners and we are paying him $120K for 12 weeks work.
    Your float pay is nothing in compairison. Get it done!

  • Feb 20

    Quote from PMFB-RN
    FWIW I pwersonaly know several RNs from our ICU who completed their BSN at WGU and had no trouble getting accepted to CRNA school.
    I graduated from CRNA school August of 2011. I got my BSN from WGU (in a year) and was accepted to two of the three programs I applied to.

  • Dec 17 '17

    Quote from PMFB-RN
    FWIW I pwersonaly know several RNs from our ICU who completed their BSN at WGU and had no trouble getting accepted to CRNA school.
    I graduated from CRNA school August of 2011. I got my BSN from WGU (in a year) and was accepted to two of the three programs I applied to.

  • Oct 6 '17

    Just wanted to add. The CRNAs in our group make more money than more than half of the physicians in the medical group. We make more than nearly all the family practice, internal med, and peds docs. Since their pay is published in a yearly internal report and ours is not most of them have no idea. If they did I think they would be highly ****** off.

  • Jul 12 '17

    So there are lots and lots of people out there who are not up on their EBP and believe that new grads must work their way up to ICU. It's not true. Evidence has shown that new grads can excel in ICU, if they are properly trained and supported. Most of the better hospital hire new grads into ICU as a matter of routine.
    It very much depends on the investment the hospital is willing to make in training and supporting you. If they don't offer the kind of training and support required to turn new nurses into ICU nurses then you are better off to work your way up.
    Ask if the unit has a history of training new grads into ICU and understands what is required.
    My hospital offers a 9 month critical care residency for new grads going into ICU. We are actually too small to support the training so grads are trained at the much larger flag ship hospital in the system then go to work in our smaller hospital.



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