Latest Likes For gigglestarsRN

Latest Likes For gigglestarsRN

gigglestarsRN 2,236 Views

Joined Oct 29, '12 - from 'Tucson, AZ'. gigglestarsRN is a Cardiac stepdown unit. She has '1' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Cardiothoracic'. Posts: 63 (35% Liked) Likes: 41

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  • Apr 29

    I have learned the wonders of peppermint oil. We can call our pharmacy and they will tube it up. I pour small amounts into medicine cups and place in room, outside door, in hallway- as out of sight as possible. It smells fresh and works especially well with c diff and high output ostomies bring emptied frequently.

  • Mar 27

    I have learned the wonders of peppermint oil. We can call our pharmacy and they will tube it up. I pour small amounts into medicine cups and place in room, outside door, in hallway- as out of sight as possible. It smells fresh and works especially well with c diff and high output ostomies bring emptied frequently.

  • Feb 6

    I have learned the wonders of peppermint oil. We can call our pharmacy and they will tube it up. I pour small amounts into medicine cups and place in room, outside door, in hallway- as out of sight as possible. It smells fresh and works especially well with c diff and high output ostomies bring emptied frequently.

  • Sep 15 '15

    I just finished my first year and the things that help me most is after loading my pockets with alcohol swabs, flushes, pill splitter and white board marker and getting report is to review the charts, make a brain sheet of meds by time and check boxes next to my "to-do's that also includes finger sticks by time with a space to write the sugar and how much insulin they get next to it, its a great reminder of my to-do;s and i add to it throughout the shift as new orders get written, and i admit is feels great to see things checked off throughout the shift. I use similar strategies on my patient's white boards so they see their plan written out and things checked off, or the list updated. It helps me feel organized, and the patient informed. Once I have my brain sheet, I grab meds and my stethoscope, listen to my patients and do a quick assessment before rounding with the rest of their meds. That gives me a good feel for their status, mental and physical, immediate needs and organize their white boards. Good luck!

  • Jun 21 '15

    Quote from noyesno
    I almost made one last night.

    The patient's wife was telling me I was such a great nurse. Ironic, because while she was doing this, I was about to hang an incorrect IVPB. Luckily, I always look at the label closely one last time before programming the pump and caught the error before I hit, "start."

    On a side note, it's funny how patients/their family members define a, "great nurse." Interpersonal skills/customer service skills are all they seem to consider when making this determination. I had gotten her pillows, blankets, fresh ice water, etc. right before I almost hung the wrong IVPB. Even after the incident, they sung my praises. Probably, because they were too distracted by my excellent customer service skills (gag me) to notice my nursing skills were actually sub-par.
    Don't be so hard on yourself, you did catch your error before it actually was one, kudos to you and double and triple checks!! I thought I made an error the other day when I gave insulin based on a verbal sugar. After I had it checked and gave it I logged on to our computer charting to get their sugar trends and my heart sank when I saw a different value. I panicked. I then noticed the time, it was the morning sugar in there and the afternoon had just been taken and the glucometer not yet docked to download results, hence taking a verbal. It turned out to be correct but served as a good reminder why we should not take verbals, lest you be given the wrong value. Good reminder without having an actual error bc that feeling stunk!!



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