Content That sueall Likes

sueall 5,197 Views

Joined Aug 12, '12. Posts: 154 (43% Liked) Likes: 142

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  • Nov 16

    Quote from sueall
    Sorry, but I just have to ask -- is this kid having any peer group or social interaction problems that would lead him to seek out positive attention at school? I know, I know, but humor the little voices in my head!
    This type of behavior when no medical problem exists always has a psych component. It is not normal for 3rd graders to express this type of anxiety. A psych consult would be in order. This type of Axis II behavior is learned from somewhere. I once had a 10 year old patient who could have a very convincing heart attack right down to the clammy sweat and color changes. Turns out the family had just moved in a grandmother with early dementia and it was causing a lot of stress for the whole family. The question is what kind of secondary gain does the student achieve through this behavior. Maybe because I am in psych I see this a bit differently. I would try to find out if there is a learning disability, bullying, problem at home before I would just dismiss the behavior.

    Hppy

  • Nov 3

    I've been a CNA for 2 years and have cared for countless hospice residents. Basically, they will have their good days and they will have their bad days. The good days are where they are alert and oriented and can communicate, help roll side to side/with transfers, and be able to express their pain and discomfort. Their bad days are where they are verbally unresponsive, can't assist at all with with turns and transfers, etc. As for if this work is back breaking, yes it very well can be. When someone is close to passing and can't help at all, always make sure they have a draw sheet underneath them to help you roll them, and have someone help you (you will especially need someone else if they are a larger). In my experience, when they are in the active process of death, they stay in bed. When they are in this state and are moaning or groaning when caring for them, just rub and hold their hand and let them know it is okay. We use swabs and dip them in water to help them drink and to keep their mouths moist. It is hard work both physically and emotionally but it is so rewarding!

  • Nov 3

    1. Do the 2 year program.
    2. Stop being the unofficial class president and focus on your studies.
    3. During your year off, work as a CNA.
    4. Figure out why you failed and work to change so it doesn't happen again.

    Not necessarily in that order.

  • Oct 11

    Lets see....being screamed at in front of a patient by an "instructor". Being told I was incompetent and not performing anywhere near to the level of my other class mates.
    Long story short...I quit , instructor was fired, and the school had in-the-toilet nclex pass rates.
    guess it wasnt ALL me!

  • Sep 16

    I just had a situation with a kid deliberately failing his hearing screening. He claiming not to hear at 80 decibels. I asked him to stay back while his peers went back to class, explained to him the rules again (he said he thought I told him only to raise his hand when he heard the first beep), and tried again.

    I would rescreen and gently, but pointedly, say "It's surprising that you cannot read the top line since you didn't have any problem seeing the clear tape on the ground. Why don't you go rinse your eyes in the bathroom and then we'll give it one more shot" This isn't directly calling him out but (if he is faking) then he will know that you are suspicious. Having him go rinse his eyes gives him a moment to cover any embarrassment and have a built in excuse if his vision is miraculously better.

  • Sep 15

    Could it possibly be that... different people take different routes, both routes can lead to success, and there are many successful NPs who took both routes?

    Because that's what I'm seeing.

  • Sep 15

    We have always sent out a letter to the entire grade when a student has been found with lice. We don't name the student but parents are made aware.

  • Sep 15

    Texas: We Care About Our Cooties

  • Sep 11

    Quote from brillohead
    Left to right, top to bottom.
    Crap, I've been doing it wrong this whole time.

  • Sep 11

    Quote from Kaydalion
    Duhh they are human beings.
    Eh. I was going to post a thoughtful response but your attitude is seriously ridiculous.

  • Aug 21

    "I've failed NCLEX 47 times, what can I do? Nursing is my dreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeam!"

  • Aug 21

    Trigger Warning: This is a general venting thread. Toes may be stepped upon. Snowflakes may face warm temperatures. No one person is the target.

    Please, fellow AN participants, make the following stop:

    1) Referring to your particular work environment as 'busy'. They are ALL busy. We get it.
    2) Using the word 'devastated' in regards to something that does not involve death, loss of limb, or major natural disaster.
    3) Talking about the PVT- I think I speak for 99% of the million or so AN members when I say this - "Patience is a virtue"
    4) Doing people's homework for them when they have made no effort beyond copy and pasting to do the work themselves.
    5) Asking a complex question and, upon getting a thoughtful answer from an expert who took time and energy to compose said answer, failing to thank the stranger who took time to help you.
    6) Mistaking the straight truth for bullying.
    7) Mistaking an answer that differs from what you want to hear for bullying.
    8) Telling experienced nurses you'd NEVER want to be like them when you have no CLUE of how their experience influenced their answer.

  • Aug 18

    What a person older than 61 can do or not do is not the question when that person can not get hired to do or not do anything. That was the point that some people addressed.

  • Aug 17

    Quote from meanmaryjean
    But here's the thing- you had AMPLE opportunity to get all of the other questions right, and didn't. I see this so often, students focus on 'that one question'. No one fails an exam because of one question. One question can be the tipping point for sure- but all of the other questions you got wrong indicate a basic failure to master the exam content.
    Agree. Consider that it is ALL the missed questions that provide inadequate care to a patient. When does that inadequate care actually cause harm?

  • Aug 17

    But here's the thing- you had AMPLE opportunity to get all of the other questions right, and didn't. I see this so often, students focus on 'that one question'. No one fails an exam because of one question. One question can be the tipping point for sure- but all of the other questions you got wrong indicate a basic failure to master the exam content.


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