Latest Comments by SDR2015

Latest Comments by SDR2015

SDR2015, MSN, RN 2,150 Views

Joined Jun 22, '12. Posts: 63 (44% Liked) Likes: 67

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 1
    Esme12 likes this.

    Advice, the patient's abdominal cavity is exposed and a portion of the "small" colon is removed during surgery. After the cavity is sutured, think about the complications of the surgical wound and your patient's body in response to the surgery. Good luck!

  • 1
    karlazz83 likes this.

    Look over Clinical Guidelines for Practice and pick the one that is most needed for all lifespans. Perhaps a topic on stress management. For children, there is stress with school or friends. For adults, the stress of working or raising a family. For the elderly, the stress of aging and chronic illnesses.

    By recognizing the symptoms of chronic stress (insomnia, anxiety, prolong feelings of sadness or hopelessness, headaches, rapid weight loss, ETOH abuse), there are ways of dealing with it (therapy, acupuncture, antidepressants, support groups or discovering hobbies)

    Hope it helps. Good luck!

  • 0

    Hey everyone,

    Just wanted to vent about nurses' attitude when one of their own becomes a NP student. I get it....there are situations when you are truly happy for your fellow colleagues or bestie. As for the frenemies, it is pure elementary. I don't discuss (brag about) my school schedule, projects or my fatigue from cram sessions. if i do, it is because you initiated the conversation. I leave my assignments and textbooks at home. Until I graduate and pass my boards, I am the same nurse with a new role. Plain and simple.

    It's just awful how nurses take out their inner frustrations on those who are advancing as Nurse Practitioners. Be inspired, instead of envious. Worked for me!

  • 1
    ethiopia likes this.

    Nursing bro,

    Congratulations on becoming a nurse! It is very overwhelming when you go through your first year as a novice. Ignore the self-righteous comments from your peers. Unfortunately, the culture of nurses eating their young is not a myth. Keep your head up and use any experience as an opportunity for professional growth. Good luck!

  • 0

    Wow! I say go after the bigger fish and report the physician to the State Boards. He is allowing the nurse to practice beyond her scope of practice. She has no business doing that unless she is an APRN. They are both a threat to the community.

  • 2
    nrsang97 and jadelpn like this.

    She is a threat to patient safety in all levels. She needs to be reported and you need to fail a complaint with Wal-mart. She picked up a prescription in your name. Whose to say that she is diverting drugs that way too (narcotic or not). It's still wrong. This is your challenge to do the right thing as a professional. Remember the code of nursing that you recited at graduation. Stick to it.!

  • 2
    wooh and SDALPN like this.

    Personally, I wouldn't because our professional identity to our society is struggling as it is. How can we be taken seriously as healthcare professionals when we add to the stereotype every Halloween. How often do you see sexy male doctors coming to the party. Tell the sexy teachers, nuns, housekeepers and secretaries hello for me.

  • 0

    If you fall for something, then you'll fall for anything. The beauty of your position is your autonomy to practice. Continue being a patient advocate and stand up for your beliefs. It shouldn't be an ethical dilemma because your APRN position allows you to have a choice. Let the physician know how you feel. Perhaps, he'll compromise with you or maybe he'll change his view. Patient education on nutrition and exercise is key instead of diet drugs for someone with undiagnosed cardiac issues. If patients are insistent, then they will get it somewhere else. Unless you continue to enable them. Depending on the situations, drugs for weight loss is not always the solution. i agree with you on that one. Good luck!

  • 1
    NewOR-RN likes this.

    There is a Class I medical device recall for the Neptune suction from the FDA. I'm surprise that your unit is still using it.

  • 0

    If you are exhibiting signs of depression, low self-esteem, and panic attacks within three months of employment. You will not get better "fighting back." without removing yourself from the hostile environment. Trust me. I know. This is unacceptable for a new graduate to go through. Their expectations should apply to a season nurse. It takes 4-6 months to precept a new grad. Do yourself a favor and go to HR for a transfer. They don't deserve you. Read your policy on workplace harrassment and present your proof. Those actions will make you a stronger nurse...that's fighting back.

  • 2
    netglow and IloveNursing2214 like this.

    It wouldn't surprise me that you are actually doing quite well and you are considered a threat to the unit. The culture of season nurses eating their young is still an issue. I suggest going to your HR rep. and request a transfer. Keep your progress notes as proof of the hostile environment. You are not crazy. You are being bullied.

  • 0

    My advice is to give her the realities of what is best for her to become a perioperative nurse. To suggest that getting an ADN is 'good enough' is injustice. Apparently, it wasn't good enough for you! I refuse to give minimal advice to those that ask. It's important to give the educational and political aspect of what is going on in nursing and how to advance yourself for future changes that will occur.

  • 0

    Here we go....Throughout the history of perioperative nursing, we have obtain our license to practice in the OR through dipolma (hospital), associates and undergraduate programs. Yes, I get it.....you don't have to obtain a BSN to practice in the OR "right now." However, did you notice that Magnet hospitals are hiring BSN nurses and requiring current employees to get their degree within 10 years? Many organizations, such as the AACN and ANA, endorses the intitative of making BSN the minimial preparation for professional practice. In the meantime, while you are being grandfathered, do you want to resist or adapt to change? Whether you're offended by my statement or not, I am speaking for those that are planning on becoming OR nurses.

    While time allows, yes get yor ADN and then transition to BSN route. Make BSN your academic goal for job security and marketability. My statement of needing your BSN to work in the OR will happen.

  • 0

    To be an OR nurse, you need your BSN.

  • 2
    Hollista and elprup like this.

    Don't be Tachy about 2012....Be Shocked that 2013 is Here!


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