Latest Comments by jajajody

Latest Comments by jajajody

jajajody 1,425 Views

Joined Jun 7, '12. Posts: 6 (17% Liked) Likes: 1

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  • 1
    dbr913 likes this.

    Our CT and MRI techs can start IVs (nurses do most though which allows techs to do more scans) and they give all IV contrast. As nurses, we prep patients for procedures, calculate GFRs, hydrate patients if needed prior to contrast administration. We also are aware of contrast allergy pts, check to ensure that pre-meds were taken and monitor these patients during and after contrast administration. In addition, nurses administer benzodiazepines to claustrophobic patients, monitor patients during conscious sedation in interventional radiology and interventional ultrasound, as well as monitor ICU patients during MRI. At my facility, we have 24 hour nursing coverage in all radiology modalities. I think we are the exception rather than the rule though. My facility is a tertiary and Level 1 Trauma Center so our needs are larger for these reasons. We rotate assignments daily. I may work in IR Monday, MRI Tuesday, radiology prep/recovery Wednesday, etc. I am an old ER nurse (25 years) and accepted a job in radiology one year ago. Not only was I surprised by how much nurses do in radiology, I found that it was an easy transition for me. I really enjoy my job and can see myself becoming a certified radiology nurse and staying in this field for the remainder of my career.

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    I am looking for feedback from other rad nurses that work in MRI and INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY. I would like to know how you deal with ICU pts and critical ER trauma pts . Do your ICU or ER nurses stay with these types of pts? If not, have there been issues?

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    I would like to hear how other institutions are handling low GFR's. At my institution, we recently started calculating GFR's for both CT. If GFR is below 60 for CT, we hydrate patients prior to the CT with contrast. The hydration process is 200cc/hr x 2 hours prior to contrast administration and 200cc/hr x 2 hours after contrast. The bad thing is that patients are coming to the hospital for what they think is a 30-60 minute visit winds up being 4 1/2 to 5 hours. We previously were just taking creatinines into consideration, but now that GRF calculations are used, many people with normal creatinines are havubg ti receuve hydration.

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    Where I work, a nurse must have either ER or ICU experience. We have many critically ill pts coming to radiology. You could likely work in CT since the ICU nurses stay with their pt in CT but otherwise these pts are left in your care. You could work in an out-pt setting where pts aren't critically, but if you are wanting a hospital setting, you need some critical care experience.

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    Quote from falally
    I'd like to get some feedback from any IR or cath lab nurses who are managed by a radiology tech. What is the normal hierarchy for these departments? Do you have a nurse to answer to? Also, are you a secondary part of the department (like an afterthought) or are you an equal with the rad techs? I am trying to affect some change in my department and I'd like to know if I'm just going to spin my wheels since these departments (or possibly just mine) are so tech oriented.
    I work at a teaching facility where the lead IR technologist is the board runner/leader of the department. Nurses are not treated as afterthoughts. Some nurses have had a problem with a rad tech directing them. My thought is we are all an essential part of the team and each has their role--the lead tech's role is to ensure that needed equip is available, staff is assigned to cases and the flow remains constant. He never tells a nurse how to nurse just like I don't tell him how to do his job. We do have a patient care coordinator (charge nurse) who supervises nurses in IR, MRI, CT, Nuc med, ultrasound.

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    Quote from Candyn
    What states are you guys in? I am not working in ICU and only started working recently but according to what I see my hospital is busy. But it maybe slow but I just do not know. I agree with you guys tho, 3 months on the floor and I only see one elective surgery.
    I am an old ER nurse who transferred to interventional radiology/angio 6 months ago. I am not so surprised to hear that SICU census is down considering all the embolizations of traumatic organ injuries that we perform on trauma patients. Not only does this cut down on the need for surgery but is shortens length of stay in SICU.



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