Latest Comments by AheleneRN

Latest Comments by AheleneRN

AheleneRN 2,985 Views

Joined May 20, '12 - from 'Loxahatchee, FL, US'. AheleneRN is a LPN. Posts: 143 (20% Liked) Likes: 30

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    I definitely would go for the night shift. My first job was at a ALF for the 1st shift and I was so overwhelmed and didn't have time to learn anything. When I accepted another position in a SNF working nights, the stress level went way down and there was plenty of time for me to learn and pick the brains of the seasoned nurses. I say go for the night shift :-)

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    I also passed with 85 questions my first time.

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    Have you tried doing the Pearson Vue trick? I don't think I could manage waiting 4 long weeks to find out if I passed or not. No way, I would die. Why not do the pvt so that you can just know now and get it over with? No need going thru unnecessary stress. You're in my prayers. God Bless!

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    Quote from SuperMeghan91
    Well if you look at the dictionary definition Overachiever - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary "one who achieves success over and above the standard or expected level" I would say that people who consistently get A's in classes as difficult as nursing classes are overachievers, or a person who achieves success over and above the standard or expected level. They are not only achieving (passing their classes) but they are overachieving by consistently succeeding above the standard. I'm curious as to what you would call people who get A's.
    I wasn't asking the definition because I know what the dictionary says. I was asking you why because it just came across as if it was a bad thing that there were students who always got A's.

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    gummi bear likes this.

    Quote from SuperMeghan91
    Our grade scale is 92-100 A, 85-91 B, 77-84 C, anything less than 77 is failing. A B is a normal grade, but we have a lot of overachievers who get A's.
    I'm just curious as to why you call the people who got A's overachievers?

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    Congratulations!!! Job well done and keep up the good work. Forget the haters!!! You're always going to have haters wherever you go, especially when you're successful at what you're doing. Ignore them because what good does it do to acknowledge them? Nothing, zero, zilch, nada! Do you and let them continue hating on you ;-)

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    Beautiful story!! I'm a brand new nurse and have only been working as one for a little under a month now. I'm going to save this story for times I know will come where I will start to forget the reason why I became a nurse in the first place. I don't ever want to lose my compassion for those that depend on me to take care of. Thank you for this story. It's a must have for new and seasoned nurses alike.

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    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Has none of you considered your carbon footprint and the environmental impact of all of these miles you are driving? I find that irresponsible. I live 1.5 miles from my office, bike to work most days, walk some and only drive in the very severe weather conditions or under exigent circumstances. I have probably driven my car or motorcycle to work on fewer than 20 days in the past 2 years. I would never consider driving 50 miles if I had any other options. It isn't all about you, you know. It is called being a good steward to the earth and the community.
    That's your opinion. The OP posted here to get Everybody's opinion, not just one person's. No need to be so harsh simply because everybody doesn't think or feel the way you do. Lighten up...

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    Quote from NicuGal
    Do you have the option of moving closer? I commute 33miles a day, 3 days a week and sometimes in bad weather I wish I lived closer. But if you absolutely hate your current job and think this is a good move then do it.
    Please disregard. I didn't mean to reply to you.

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    Fiona59 likes this.

    Quote from seks
    So are you all saying my past clinical instructors are incompetent and don't know what they were thinking?So who is right or wrong or too anal or giving unecessary steps in this situation? My current preceptor or my past clinical instructors/buddy nurses?That is my MAIN question.It really is frustrating when you get different opinions on a technique and I don't know who to believe or abide by. Guess that is part of the so-called "reality shock"
    For goodness sake, do it the way your preceptor says. Your clinical instructors are not the ones signing off on your orientation. Your preceptor is in charge not your clinical instructors. When you were in school, you learned according to how your clinical instructors taught you. BUT you are no longer in school so why would you go against the person that could make a difference between staying employed after your orientation or back to looking in the classifieds?! Do it his/her way and then develop your own way once you're done and have your own patients. Just my two cents. Good luck to you...

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    Just search on this site Study Guide. It will pop up.

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    Why do you need to say anything at all? It's nobody's business!!!! I'm sorry I just can't get into explaining to people things that they don't need to know. Just keep going along like you've been. Best of luck to you and God Bless!

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    Quote from Patti_RN
    I received a resume that had ALL identifying information blacked out! Name, phone number, address, the names of schools attended, as well as the names of previous employers. The cover letter indicated that privacy concerns and fears of identity theft prevented her from sharing this information with a 'total stranger'. She signed her letter with her first name and included an email address that she apparantly created to hide her name and also communicate her professionalism, FoxyRedHeadPartier@____ .com
    You've got to be kidding me?!!!! ROTF LMBO!!!


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