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AheleneRN 3,515 Views

Joined May 20, '12 - from 'Loxahatchee, FL, US'. AheleneRN is a LPN. Posts: 143 (20% Liked) Likes: 30

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  • Sep 23 '15

    An open letter in response to #NursesUnite:

    It is amazing that you have finally found a cause to unite over (#nursesunite), however, I find it hard to jump on board this superficial bandwagon that actually serves the nursing profession no purpose whatsoever.

    I have pondered over the last week why it is that so many nurses take such offense to the few words of an ignorant television host, being that Ms. Behar has zero impact or influence on the healthcare profession or the role of nursing, yet they do nothing to end the many real issues plaguing the nursing profession.

    The only conclusion that I can come up with is that nurses feel that they can’t do much to change the real problems in nursing, so they unite and attack over something that really makes no difference at all to us as a whole.

    There are so many other REAL aspects of the nursing profession to unite over to influence change that will actually make a difference to nursing. There are many “dirty secrets” of nursing that go unspoken and ignored, many of which are cultivated by nurses themselves.

    Bullying, horizontal violence, inadequate training, nurses “eating their young”, 12+ hour shifts, no breaks, high acuities, too many patients per nurse, etc.
    I went into nursing because I like to help people. I am empathetic. I am a quick thinker. I am smart. But that isn’t actually what makes a nurse successful in this profession, as I have come to find out. As I have come to find out, nursing has less to do with how competent or compassionate you are, and more to do with how much you can, or are willing to, put up with. The nursing culture is full of “suck it ups” and “oh well, it is how it is.”

    What seems to make a nurse successful is the ability to withstand bullying, intimidation, being talked down to by supervisors, patients, family members, and doctors. The ability to get over inadequate training and support provided by management and your peers and to be okay with unsafe patio to nurse ratios. You’ll feel more confident in time, it’s just a part of nursing.

    To be successful in nursing, you have to be okay with having zero time to take a break (even a bathroom break) and most times, taking your lunch sometimes 8 hours past your start time, or sometimes not even getting a lunch. You have to be okay with being dehydrated while hanging patient’s IV bags and shaking from not being able to take a break and eat while you are checking diabetic’s blood sugars and teaching the importance of proper urinary hygiene to avoid UTIs while you’ve been holding your own urine for the past 5 hours. Nurses are expected to just be okay with it. It’s just a part of nursing, right?

    You have to be okay with coming in early to “get familiar” with your patient load and not getting paid for that time. You have to be okay with staying well past your shift to give report on a regular basis, taking your total time on the clock (and off) well into 14-15 hours, which means that you are so tired driving home that you hope you make it there without crashing because your brain is tired mush. But long shifts are just a part of nursing.

    You have to be okay with having to do more with less, even if it affects patient safety and outcomes. You have to be okay with doctors yelling at you and treating you like you’re an incompetent idiot rather than a professional colleague in health care. You know that if you call a doctor to clarify orders or to update on your mutual patient, you may be met with disdain and sarcasm. But that’s okay too, because it’s just a part of nursing.

    Nurses know this to be true. Nurses know these are the dirty secrets of nursing. Nurses know that bullying is rampant. Yet, the answer to this problem is “grow a thicker skin” or “you’ll just get used to it”.

    Nurses know that understaffing is a given and that high acuity and high patient loads per nurse is more common than not. Nurses know this isn’t safe, they know the care being given isn’t what it should or could be, but they do not unite together against it and demand change.

    Nurses know that there is often a lack of adequate training and preceptorship for new grads and new employees entering new specialty areas and that too many times nurses get thrown to the wolves and it’s a sink or swim mentality. But, this is just a part of nursing we accept.

    Nurses know this. They live it. They experience it. It is the culture of nursing. Yet, there is no call to end it. No hash tag. No selfies. No viral campaign on social media. No standing up to it. Just the continued mentality that these things are just a part of nursing that you have to accept or leave.

    So, instead of uniting together against something or someone that has no impact on nursing, why not stand up and unite against the things that are killing the nursing profession and demand they change?

    Sincerely,
    A disillusioned nurse

  • Mar 13 '15

    Wow! That's fantastic! I did like Kaplan! A Lot of my friends found it to be extremely helpful. Everything works differently for people you know? First time around I did Kaplan and didn't pass. I think my issue was relaxing and thinking through the harder questions. The online review is great. I actually did both you get the same benefits! If you have problems there are online teachers willing to help out. I know I sound like a broken record. The LaCharity book for me was the game changer. I swear by that book it's amazing

  • Mar 13 '15

    OP... This forum is often a toxic cesspool of snark and eye rolling unless your topic is of interest to 'seasoned' nurses.

    See the thread titled FLAME ON for examples of 'forbidden' topics. NCLEX help and anything regarding spirituality and encouragement is definitively on the list. Oops I snarked. Must be contagious

    You must have a thick skin to post on AN.

  • Mar 13 '15

    comments and people like you are the reason I offered my opinion of not continuing to read posts. Look guys I'm just trying to help people stay positive. Because that's what I needed most during my journey...just keep your negarivity on your side. Thanks

  • Mar 13 '15

    Never lose the hope... I appreciate your sweet response but don't let comments like this or people anger you. This is what I was trying to say about this site, it doesn't only bring goodness. Don't even let your mind engage in this stuff!!

    thnk you again though!! Happy studying you can do this! You are a nurse and you will have that RN soon

  • Mar 13 '15

    Just chill dude. People on here need positivity. Keep it that way.

  • Mar 13 '15

    Quote from GinabinaRN
    My reason for posting this was to give inspiration and positive self worth. Not to bring anyone down. You read way too much into my comment, moving you to feel the need to post on it. You have been a nurse for 4 years as I can see... Being an a more experienced nurse you should only bring positive vibes and comments. Yes, YOU ARE VERY RIGHT, everyone knows you need to pass the NCLEX to be a RN. Being a nurse comes in many forms... I am not going to go back and forth with you. I hope your wishes are sincere. Thank you for your comment! Glad we could clear that up =)To all of you studying.. NURSEEEEEEEEEE ON... I strongly suggest actually never logging into this site again, as some comments may deter you and steer you off of your track of concentration. Keep going and STAY POSITIVE!
    Thanks Gina, and Congrats! Some how this site has some negative people. I will stay positive!

  • Mar 13 '15

    being a nurse takes many qualities other than a test.. Compassion, love, social skills I could go on and on but I refuse to facilitate a conversation with a antagonistic person like yourself. You're the type of nurse who's compassion should be questioned. So! If you wouldn't mind...Take your negativity and your LOL somewhere else. Thanks!

    NURSE GINA

  • Mar 13 '15

    My reason for posting this was to give inspiration and positive self worth. Not to bring anyone down. You read way too much into my comment, moving you to feel the need to post on it. You have been a nurse for 4 years as I can see... Being an a more experienced nurse you should only bring positive vibes and comments. Yes, YOU ARE VERY RIGHT, everyone knows you need to pass the NCLEX to be a RN. Being a nurse comes in many forms... I am not going to go back and forth with you.

    I hope your wishes are sincere. Thank you for your comment! Glad we could clear that up =)

    To all of you studying.. NURSEEEEEEEEEE ON... I strongly suggest actually never logging into this site again, as some comments may deter you and steer you off of your track of concentration. Keep going and STAY POSITIVE!

  • Dec 24 '14

    Quote from bluebonnetrn
    ...
    A lot of that is because they treat me like a primary care clinic...
    Your back has been hurting for the last month? Go see the nurse.
    You were in a minor fender bender 2 days ago? Go see the nurse.
    But I suppose that is a topic for another post.
    Ugh, I hate this! I, too, feel like the Urgent Care for everyone in the building, plus the parents. Some doozies:

    "Johnny fell and banged his head really hard on Saturday. He was dazed and lost his memory for a little while. Can you take a look at him to make sure he's OK?" Received a note like this on a Monday morning!!

    From a staff member: "I don't feel good. Can you listen to my lungs and see if I need an antibiotic? I don't want to waste a copayment." GRR!

    A dad at Open House: "You know, my knee has been hurting for a week or so. What do you think it could be?"

    GO TO THE DOCTOR!!!!!!!

  • Dec 24 '14

    I like working holidays. I'm still a new nurse (with 1 year as a PCA) so this is only my second holiday season... but I just think about it not being me on the other side of the bed pan. Who wants to spend their holiday season as a patient - maybe a select few but not many. So go in there today and tomorrow and brighten someones day And eat all the cookies

  • Dec 10 '14

    Document -- PSN or incident report or whatever. Also talk to your manager about this. If he's well known for doing this sort of nonsense, you'd like to do that.

    I once took a verbal order from a physician who later denied having given the order. (This was a LONG time ago, when verbal orders were common.) Another physician had witnessed the interaction, so I had back-up. My manager popped out of her office with a Polaroid camera, for those who remember what that is, and snapped his picture. She then put it up on the bulletion board in the break room on a huge, bright red poster board with letters one foot high saying "Do NOT Take Verbal Orders From This Yahoo!" Within hours, he was in her office begging to be told what he could do to get his picture taken down! No one EVER had problems with him again. (Except the one time the cardiac surgeon punched him, but that's a whole 'nother story.)

  • Dec 10 '14

    Quote from flexiseal
    When I was a newer nurse I worked in a unit with a lot of new grads/new nurses on night shift. Days were always staffed with more experienced RNs. But we definitely had about 5 nurses with experience who would be in charge. It was kinda fun in that we would all work together as a team. If we had a really sick patient or something going on we would bounce ideas off of one another. I would always ask fellow nurses what do you think? It was a great learning environment.

    We had residents though and an intensivist on at night, so of course they were a big resource should a patient crash.
    My first job was like that. That job had more beginner and novice nurses than my current one, but I actually thought it was safer. Expert nurses are useless to the unit if they keep their heads down and refuse to help others. Cliques and isolationism are bigger problems than overall unit experience levels, IMO, especially in critical care where a nurse may not even be able to do basic care like turns alone. At my current job everyone keeps to themselves... it is very scary. I have tried to engage coworkers in conversations about the patients on the unit but they just shut me down. It is very much an every man for himself mentality. Give me a unit full of newbies who like teamwork any day over this. I feel like if you get ten new grads talking, at least one will remember something helpful from nursing school, and that's better than one beginner nurse in a room alone with five nearby experienced coworkers wrapped up in the novels they are reading at the desk...

  • Nov 21 '14

    Business casual, period. In no way should anything you're wearing be described as cute or trendy. Nothing tight-fitting. Nothing that reads in ANY way except clean, well-presented, well-groomed, and professional.

    At no point are jeans ever part of 'business casual'. They are not professional, no matter the cut or style. They are still jeans. If you're wearing jeans, that's plain old 'casual', and not the impression you want to give.

    Keep jewelry to a minimum and in 'quiet' taste. Nothing that blares "bling", please.

    With the access to the internet and therefore access to definitions of things such as 'business casual', I'm frequently surprised by what people show up wearing---when SPECIFICALLY told to wear BC.

    For warm weather, no flip flops, no shorts, no short skirts, no spaghetti-strapped tops, nothing low cut or tight, no t-shirts with graphics.

    For cold weather....also none of the above!

  • Oct 22 '14

    I remember, 12 years later, the nurse who held my hand, for 10 seconds, the day before my mom died. She looked in my eyes, said nothing, squeezed my hand, got up and walked away. I have no idea what her name was, would never be able to pick her out on the street. She is the main reason that I made the decision to become a nurse. i can't explain it, I don't want to try. Some of you just get it. Thank you.


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