Content That kablammo Likes

Content That kablammo Likes

kablammo 1,458 Views

Joined May 14, '12. Posts: 3 (33% Liked) Likes: 2

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  • May 22

    I've seen this happen a couple of times in 30-plus years as a psych nurse. I've found that the nurse usually has at least as much pathology as the ex-patient they're dating. And it's not always the patient that's the vulnerable one. Some of these guys are cons and know how to weave their way into some idiotic nurse's heart. Either way, this is definitely a bad situation and somebody needs to have a talk with Nurse Hot Pants.

  • May 20

    Quote from Irish_Mist
    Straight from the Department of Justice: "Sexual assault is any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient. Falling under the definition of sexual assault are sexual activities as forced sexual intercourse, forcible sodomy, child molestation, incest, fondling, and attempted rape."

    There is no mention of shaving pubic hair without consent. You could argue that it is battery since this was done without her consent but the sexual assault argument does not hold weight at all.
    "The term "sexual fondling" means the touching of the private body parts of another person (including the genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks) for the purpose of sexual gratification."

    Since when is it ok to handle patients' genitals when it is not required for medical care?

    If that were me, I would feel utterly violated. I would raise heck. If that were my patient, I would raise heck. I would document and file an incident report and report to however many managers I needed for an intervention to take place. How do you define what is uncceptable to do to an unconscious patient outside medical necessity, if you think touching and shaving a vulva is ok?

    On the note of hair in general, 99% of the time it is NOT a hygiene issue. If it wraps around a Foley (which was recently discussed), get permission to trim it. If it's literally caking with feces, maybe get permission to trim it. As someone pointed out, shaving is likely to compromise skin integrity in an area that - esp with bowel incontinence - is saturated with unfriendly bacteria. In four years, I have never once had a patient that needed their pubic hair removed for the sake of hygiene.

  • May 7

    I have a whole different take on this issue. This young man clearly has behavior/psych issues. Could be anything from borderline personality disorder to High Functioning Autism. The biggest key that there is a sensory issue is his refusal to make eye contact. so you telling him to stop what he is doing and make eye contact could be very threatening to him. I work in an acute psych environment and YOUR behavior could very likely end with your getting hurt. Every person who overdoses should be considered a suicide attempt until proven otherwise. Person's in the middle of a mental health crises can present as angry, rude, obscene, calm, happy, labile. As nurses we should not be passing judgement on these patients or their families who have likely been dealing with these maladaptive behaviors for years. Also where psych is concerned I have found that the mental health apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

    The fact that he started screaming and punching himself in the head could be clear signs of psychosis and not necessarily bad behavior.

    I honestly believe every nurse should work at least a year in a psych setting. These patients are not all locked away in psych wards anymore - they pop up on every unit.

    Hppy

  • Apr 27

    Quote from Ndy-RN
    Lorazepam (Advan) is an anti-anxiety medication and could also be used to treat seizures. Many people (mire than you know) do take that...in some cases including nurses. No one will penalize you for taking Lorazepam! It is not their business to go into your confidential medical history to see if you have a prescription or not. You are worried for nothing! Stay Calm and get ready to start tour BScN program. [emoji4]
    I'm baffled as to how you can claim to be a nurse yet get such egregiously false "advice"!

  • Apr 17

    Quote from RNINIA5
    "patient sitting in chair eating a piece of candy, does not like what is on TV and says the hospital food is gross ".
    Well, if the Patient is unable to transfer themself, is diabetic, has no TV in their room, and liked the Hospital food, I'd say you had a Psychosis NOS axis I, DM axis III, and the charting would be relevant.

    Otherwise, it's superfluous.

  • Apr 8

    Did you dominate the inserts, and were they adorable?

  • Apr 6

    Quote from Anna Flaxis
    A person who is determined to harm his or herself can change their plans according to the circumstances. Pills, weapons, or sharp objects can be hidden in clothing.

    The goal of the initial encounter in the ED is not to persuade the patient not to self-harm. It is to make the patient and the staff safe, and bring in a professional assessment to determine if the patient is safe to discharge or needs to be admitted to an inpatient setting for further treatment.

    Patient and staff safety is achieved by removing clothing and personal items that can be used for self harm or as weapons, placing the patient in a room with no cords, tubes, heavy objects, or other items that can be used for self harm or as weapons, and frequent observation at regular intervals.

    Active suicidal ideation is a medical emergency. Just as we undress the victim of a car crash, for example, who is at risk for death or disability and must be rapidly and thoroughly assessed for injury, the suicidal patient is also at risk, and we are obligated to take steps to ensure the person's safety.

    It has nothing to do with power, control, dominance, humiliation, or any of the, quite frankly, disturbing attributes with which the OP is painting her experience. I'm really kind of speechless, actually. It has everything to do with keeping the patient and the staff safe, and nothing more.
    Not all suicidal persons have the same level of risk to self harm. Unless the person is in severe psychosis, there is always ambivalence at play. Especially with someone who recognize their own feelings, determine that they need help and set about to seek that help. And that assessment ( of the risks to self harm) is done by simply talking with the person.

    This cookie cutter approach used here implies that every person who thinks about suicide is a time-ticking bomb waiting to explode. Not so. A majority of depressed people are in fact non violent.

    To insist on striping someone of his or her dignity, under the guise of safety, might precipitate a peaceful situation into possible violent acts. All this when said person only wanted to explore their own feelings with a professional therapist.

    I will say it again, safety is not the end all be all. Comon sense must be applied.

    Dany

  • Apr 6

    Quote from OCNRN63
    And buy enough for all three shifts. This is a side comment. It used to bug me to no end when a family would bring a treat in "for everyone" and there would be nothing left for 3-11/11-7. I had someone tell me that day's deserved to eat more because they did most of the work.

    This has been a public service announcement. We now return you to you scheduled program.
    I'm not sure what you are complaining about. I mean, I bet you got to clean up the mess when you got to work, and the smell of pizza lingered even though only a couple half masticated crusts remained.

    Oh, and of course all our patients slept all night - we (night shift) had it SO easy. *gag*

  • Apr 6

    Quote from Farawyn
    Nope, not allowed.
    Why doesn't Dad write a great letter about the workers to the DON (or whomever) and buy the floor some pizza?
    And buy enough for all three shifts. This is a side comment. It used to bug me to no end when a family would bring a treat in "for everyone" and there would be nothing left for 3-11/11-7. I had someone tell me that day's deserved to eat more because they did most of the work.

    This has been a public service announcement. We now return you to you scheduled program.

  • Apr 4

    Nonesense and outdated - making nursing diagnoses!

  • Mar 6

    we're worried about scents when we have pts who can literally stink up a whole floor( to where other pts are gagging) ?

    Also, we have to wipe everything down with bleach and whatever that dispatch stuff is. And housekeeping has added vinegar ( which helps) to their cleaning materials

    So if the place doesnt smell like poop, it smells like a pool, or a salad.

    I dont think anyone notices my deoderant.

  • Mar 6

    Quote from RNdynamic
    What do you think of going to work with parabens on you?

    Do you generally avoid parabens when you get ready to go to work in the morning, or do you apply them liberally? Do you think parabens factor into creating a "safe" environment? Some people are strongly against parabens. Where do you fall on the matter of bringing in parabens to work or spraying parabens around at work.
    I spray parabens in the bathroom after I sit there for a while when my unit is crazy busy or there is a code happening. I find that it makes the unit more therapeutic for me.

  • Mar 5

    You answer your home phone by saying the name of the facility you work at followed by your name.
    You hit "9" on your home phone before dialing.

  • Feb 27

    Quote from MidLifeRN2012
    Psych is pretty non- stressful once you get used to the types of patients you get. My unit doesn't take medically compromised patients outside of having DM2 or HTN. No wounds, IVs, catheters. No bed bounds. All ambulatory and self toileting. Most invasive thing is an IM injection of psych meds when pt acts out. Pills and charting mostly. An occasional Code Grey with restraints but it is not as common as you may think.
    You must work on a nice unit. Many psych units are dumping grounds for patients no one else wants to deal with. For instance if they have medical and psych issues, psych "wins" and the patient is yours. It's also a dumping ground for nurses who don't want to nurse, so you may end up with less than stellar co-workers.

    I worked psych for many years and wouldn't nominate it for the Stress-Free Award.

  • Feb 27

    Quote from MidLifeRN2012
    Psych is pretty non- stressful once you get used to the types of patients you get. My unit doesn't take medically compromised patients outside of having DM2 or HTN. No wounds, IVs, catheters. No bed bounds. All ambulatory and self toileting. Most invasive thing is an IM injection of psych meds when pt acts out. Pills and charting mostly. An occasional Code Grey with restraints but it is not as common as you may think.
    On my unit, I am frequently the only nurse for 14 patients. We tend to put patients in seclusion / restraints often. Staff are attacked. I would not say that psych is easy or "non-stressful".


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