Latest Comments by maddmaddie

Latest Comments by maddmaddie

maddmaddie, ASN 1,175 Views

Joined May 4, '12. Posts: 7 (43% Liked) Likes: 8

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed. [IMG]http://allnurses.com/image/webp;base64,UklGRoICAABXRUJQVlA4THYCAAAvEUAEELcDt7 ZtVdW7+hR3J3KPoAFCBg1QiPZADdRACUTEbpG7u/N/FXBj23bV7H3w3nsXE1IJBZCReuiJCCSVoi7UhqDY1rasenF3d4 8ukegTYFFJJBsDM3A6nU4iuXt1d+f6FQikOIVZLsP3/x8QEQOUeSOxVSznRoGUMNLbXgxQ4QeLq+LpRhy0jPWf4nvEqRO dus8kNkiKz36JIyK+RmCZS3E1jPKrX/KgNflbJdSJGr+LNDM0VESSt2gUbSZUBKUrr+jOaFjMElp/2AINAONT2OPr/8TZjVggAs03AZxvmUKH1qYw8vIGA6BiUBI+cry/bh4AUCAixxQp0aHFNxKGuTkIwEZDrgQEIIi2jmEfbpkAACtRew vu6WC8shPQNcNrkAqvmjb3kLn0GZgBIXPgN03OQ3B3Ro+HqmBD eOJx4OGamjQtxHjNqBshAWA+BamrxCpmXl+7CCs4KAAkGJyTFV XtqIAHsAA3LQgiAAYAh0UEEGTbNh292LZt22rHdtqKnT/+G44hov+JziyB/BHkAha6IksLw/8D/A8LUjI6M3WRxXa3h912EdEx0ZGkf7c0O59b+Ow0Le96EgLJwGv 9hfIIqr9g9Q4kiJG7s9QwmD7ADIOa5T7H4PdSb9gpDdjpLdXlK 7+S2Gkei86xU/Jb6VuGJpgR8k+QNwI2CY192mUj/mqA4BiCBngNt9cexd+qkYDieAPjYgLamx8Fr7JcrW/WeXT/crUeu+0msLvH62OAjsSVVcnmLI2h5LSV1iUxAqKmb26tL1rmlo aIjjR1ZrW+GGfVNHQmiFzPH2v4eHGJCOiEw1PZXJnKASqZkEOl 4BA=[/IMG]

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

  • 0

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed.

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

  • 0

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."
    -Also, Michael Linares Youtube videos really helped.

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed.

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

  • 0

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed.

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

  • 0
  • 2
    Noctor_Durse and LPN-RN17 like this.

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    --Also, you can take the NCLEX 8 times a year in Alaska.

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."
    -Also, Michael Linares Youtube channel really helped as well.

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed.

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

  • 0

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."
    -Watching Michael Linares YouTube channel was really helpful too.

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed.

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

    I also landed a RN job right away working at a long term acute care hospital, I start August 8th.

  • 0

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."
    -Watching Michael Linares YouTube channel was really helpful too.

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed.

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

    I also landed a RN job right away working at a long term acute care hospital, I start August 8th.

  • 0

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."
    -Watching Michael Linares YouTube channel was really helpful too.

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed.

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

    I also landed a RN job right away working at a long term acute care hospital, I start August 8th.

  • 0

    I failed NCLEX-RN 5 times, PASSED on the 6th try!

    THERE IS HOPE!!!!!

    My rationale for failing so many times:
    1. I didn't have very good self-discipline to study on my own, I've always done better in a classroom setting where there is structure, deadlines, homework, and a teacher to help keep me accountable.
    2. I didn't know where to begin to study...my studying was very unorganized, sporadic, and I was completely lost. I wasted lots of money on books and online programs that I never completed.
    3. I struggled between study time, work time and play time. (I went through a break up and then I went on 2 vacations after graduation, Vegas and Hawaii.....premature celebration lol. I thought I would have passed by then. hmmmmm, nope!).

    What I did differently:
    1. After doing some research about others who have failed so many times, I learned that most everyone had to put in 4-6 hours of studying a day! Well, that's very difficult when you work 8 hours a day, that's pretty much working 14 hours a day everyday, talk about BURNOUT! Plus, no time for fun or a life. I couldn't imagine those who had a family too. Yikes!
    2. After this realization, I started planning, how can I fit in more hours of studying without burning out? How can I manage to work only part-time and pay my bills too? How can I manage all of this? I ended up calculating how much money I would need to save in order to take the summer off to study. I had 2 jobs, worked 60 hours a week for 5 months, and saved up over $7,000. I ended up quitting my full time job and kept my part-time LPN office job because they allowed me to study at work (PERFECT!). I worked 4 hours a day, and studied mostly while at work, and was still able to enjoy my summer.

    3. BOOKS:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."
    -Watching Michael Linares YouTube channel was really helpful too.

    4. Over a course of 3 months, I read the comprehensive review front to back, did questions from the Prioritization Delegation book, and completed each question with the Kaplan suggestions. ALSO - study some questions with a fellow medical friend, talk the question out, explain each others rationale, and see who got it right. My friends helped TREMENDOUSLY because it was good to get different perspectives and also to see what I was doing wrong.

    5. What I was doing wrong....I tested WAY TO FAST!!!!! I would skip over very important words such as "most, never, always, all, do not include, etc." Once my friends pointed this out and I was conscious of it, I made myself slow down and I noticed significant improvement. Also, having a very good understanding of prioritization, which patient to see first, discussing these questions with friends was very helpful to see different perspectives and understand the rationales better.
    (Also, I plastered lab values and facts all over my bathroom. Seeing the info every day helped me remember the numbers).

    6. Tests I failed....I would always get 200+ questions and take 5+ hours. Which was torture! Plus, I would receive a email the same day by 445pm saying I failed.

    7. The test I passed....I watched the timer, and made myself take at least 3-5 minutes on each question, I would apply the Kaplan questions to my answer to see if it made sense, I would ask myself, "in this scenario, who could DIE?" "which is acute? Which is chronic? What is actual? What is potential?" ....after 2.5 hours, the computer shut off at 75 questions. Because this was a break in pattern, I had a feeling I finally did it. I never received a email saying I failed. I kept searching my name in the license search engine until it finally popped up the next day at 5pm showing my RN license! :-D

    After 1.5 years, and 5 attempts, I FINALLY DID IT on the 6th try! FML! HOW FLIPPIN' EMBARRASSING that it took me this long. But ya know, I was competing against myself, and I had come too far NOT to get my RN license. I can FINALLY move on to bigger better things. Its all about determination. Expect the worst, but hope for the best, and keep trying, even if it takes 10+ times, keep studying, change strategies until you find something that works and makes sense to you. I had to change my entire environment so it was study friendly. Do what needs to be done because it will pay off in the end.

    I also landed a RN job right away working at a long term acute care hospital, I start August 8th.

  • 0

    I failed the NCLEX 5 times and passed on the 6th try. There is HOPE!

    Books I used before passing:
    -Comprehensive Review for NCLEX-RN by Maryann Hogan
    -Prioritization Delegation & Management of Care for the NCLEX-RN exam by Davis Plus.
    + Google image, "Kaplan -Decision Tree, Who do you see first?, Common NCLEX Traps, Therapeutic Communication Tips."

  • 0

    Quote from jballa34
    I'm currently one semester away from completing my LVN/LPN program here in California. I would like to move back up to Alaska as soon as possible and hopefully take the UAA offered LPN to AAS RN program. My current school offers a similar program, but like I said, I would rather be in Alaska.

    So my question is, how does the distance learning portion of the program operate? Do they have a specific number of students that they allow in regardless of the site, or do they allocate a certain number for their distance learning sites? Are a certain amount of hours required at the UAA campus or is it possible to complete the entire program stationed out of Ketchikan for example.

    Thanks for any insight possible!
    I'm in the LPN to RN bridge program at UAA, I will graduate May of 2014. As far as the distance learning portion, I'm not sure how it works exactly. I suggest making an appointment with one of the UAA School of Nursing counselors over the phone and ask them (make a list of questions to ask!). I believe, where ever there is a local college (a branch of UAA), you can complete the bridge program at that location.

    Here is the UAA school of nursing website...it says Ketchikan is on the list of schools!
    http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/schoolofnu...each/index.cfm

  • 0

    Haven't been on this website in awhile!!

    Well, I ended getting my LPN license and I've been accepted into the UAA LPN to RN bridge program immediately after I graduated LPN school. After fall and spring semesters, I'll graduate as a RN in May of 2014! Yay! I didn't have to move out of state.

    Thanks for your input. I'm really glad I went for my LPN first, it really sped up the process and I didn't have to be put on a waiting list.

    Maddie

  • 0

    The most important thing to get into the AAS at UAA is the PAX test, students are accepted based on points system. And that test can give you up to 10 points which is alot!

    I took test and I can say it SUCKS! It has NOTHING to do with nursing or the medical field which doesn't make sense why they would use that test. I applied to the ADN program in Kenai and wasn't accepted (they take 12 students and over 40 applied). I ended up completing the LPN program through AVTEC and got accepted into the LPN to RN bridge program immediately, no waiting! (UAA accepts up to 12 LPN students and only 5 applied this year, so we all got in because there was no competition). Once I complete this fall and spring semesters I will graduate as a RN May of 2014. :-)

  • 0

    Alaska LPN (new grad).

    $18 an hr at Flu Clinic. $18 an hr at Urgent Care Clinic. $28 an hr at employee health clinic (all PRN jobs).....it all depends where you work. I know state jobs pay ALOT more for LPNs, around $26 starting wage for LPNs if you work at a jail or state nursing home.

    But I'm not too worried about the wage, I just want the experience to make my resume' look good for when I graduate as a RN in May 2014.


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