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queserasera 13,264 Views

Joined Apr 4, '12 - from 'Mid-Atlantic'. queserasera is a Full-Time Student. Posts: 720 (33% Liked) Likes: 576

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  • Jun 5

    It's that time again, the prerequisite and nursing school boards will be filling with new fall students. The most common questions I see are usually people feeling worried about some of the "harder" classes associated with the prerequisite and nursing curriculums. I find that it was never a subject that had me stumped, but more so, how I approached a subject. I went years trying to figure out what worked for me. I found some things worked in certain courses and failed miserably in other. (i.e. What do you mean I can't use flashcards for everything?!) Reading other peoples study tips have always helped me figure out my own study flow, so I want to give you my tried and true take on how to do well in anything. Of course, your attitude is important, I've wrote about this before. So make sure you're positive, regardless of your studying approach. Okay, okay, on to the good stuff.

    1. Evaluate your study needs for the upcoming semester.

    Evaluate how you've done in similar courses in previous years. List your classes from most challenging to easiest based on how you've done in those subjects in the past. For me math is always at the top of that list. I know I need to dedicate more time to working math problems that I do writing a paper.

    2. The syllabus, it's a blueprint for success!

    When you get your syllabus make note of what is graded and the weight. Is attendance and participation 50% of your grade? Or is your grade made of tests only? You'll want to focus your attention to the highest weight, i.e. always speak up in class or study and ace the tests. Always know if supplemental instruction is offered for each course, what your instructors office hours are and where that office is. Office hours are there for a reason use them often. Even if it's to ask something you could find out from a class mate. Ask the instructor, besides, remember letters of recommendation are easier from professors to write if they know who you are!

    3. Have you been putting in the time?

    Evaluate how many hours a week you've studied in the past, did you ever get to a exam and groan that you should've studied more? Write down how much you studied and honestly evaluate if it was enough. A good rule of thumb for pre-reqs in 2 hours study time to 1 hour class time. 3 hours worth of lecture, study for 6 hours throughout the week. "Whoa, that's too much" read on, I've got tricks up my sleeve.

    4. Time suckers.

    Figure out your "Time Suckers", do you find yourself on facebook for hours or reading articles on Quora, measure this as if it were a study time so you can limit it in a later part

    5. Make a schedule based on your academic and personal needs.

    This is how I do it.. Take a schedule ( a sheet with 7 columns of days of the week and rows for every hour that your typically awake say 9am to 10pm) first write your classes and lab times down, these are #1. If you work record your schedule, if you commute record your travel time, record meal times if you have regular ones. Record any regularly scheduled personal commitments, dinner with mom on Sunday, date nights, taking the kids places. Lastly, add in your time suckers. If you know you'll get sucked into a 4 hour Netflix session on a saturday... write it down. We will leave NOTHING unaccounted for friends! Record any special things you want to do throughout the week, even if it's just coffee with a pal. 
Look over your schedule sheet, this is the time you now have available to study and take care of class assignments. 


On this handy little schedule you've just made yourself you've got paper gold. A schedule of your life, now to add in the studying.

    Preview


    Before each class schedule a preview of 5-30 minutes. (If you have 3 classes in a row (class a, class b, class c) study In order c,b,a) During the preview your goal is to check the syllabus to see what's going on in that class, review notes and textbook in accordance from the last class, and review your written assignments and problems. Make sure to proofread any assignments your turning in too as a last accuracy check (I can't tell you how many last minute mistakes I find in stuff!)


    Lecture


    Having done your "preview" you're now ready for your lecture. Listen, make notes, ask questions, recite and discuss. Always get involved in your lecture if you can. Even if no one else is talking. The biggest growth I've had as a student is not caring what other people thought of me. I don't care if I'm the "obnoxious girl that asks all the questions". Fact is, at the end of a lecture I'm walking away with the pieces of the puzzle that I was missing. The other great thing about the preview is if there is an impromptu quiz, you'll be ready


    Review


    I know, I know, reviewing too? But I just previewed! But this is a "sneaking in study" trick. After every class I review what I went over in lecture. It may seem silly to review the same day, but but going over the material again, despite how well you THINK you know it, I promise you more things will stick into your long term memory. I'm a visual learner so I summarize/ make a story out of the notes I just took in class. If you're auditory, I'd suggest listening to your lecture via a recorder, or going to a lab if you're tactile.

    Study


    Lastly, study! I study the night before each class. So if I have 2 lectures on a Monday I study for about an hour and a half just those two subjects. I use a study-reading method technique called SQ3R (The SQ3R Reading Method) that is awesome for reading through textbooks. I write down questions and personal reactions to the text for discussion in the next lecture. The neat thing about doing it this way is, say you have a bio lecture 3x a week and a bio lab. By previewing, reviewing and studying you're learning biology 16 times a week (4 previews, 4 lectures, 4 reviews, 4 study times) Instead of the traditional 8 times (4 lectures, 4 study periods). Cramming before a major test is replaced by quick previews and reviews. I also like to add in a weekly review of everything I learned the previous week on Friday nights, school is my job and I am taking it seriously enough to miss out on Friday happy hour with the buddies.

    Extra Credit: 
Persist in managing your study time!

    If you add/drop a class, change work hours, or develop a new hobby revise your schedule. Don't get discouraged if you don't make every preview/review, it's inevitable that other commitments may get in the way, but monitor if they're always getting In the way, they may be one of those time suckers I talked about. Whenever your grades go down, or you fall behind in your class assignments also re evaluate what you're spending your time on. I hope you all have an incredibly successful semester and continue to give your all to this crazy path we're taking together!

  • May 28

    It's that time again, the prerequisite and nursing school boards will be filling with new fall students. The most common questions I see are usually people feeling worried about some of the "harder" classes associated with the prerequisite and nursing curriculums. I find that it was never a subject that had me stumped, but more so, how I approached a subject. I went years trying to figure out what worked for me. I found some things worked in certain courses and failed miserably in other. (i.e. What do you mean I can't use flashcards for everything?!) Reading other peoples study tips have always helped me figure out my own study flow, so I want to give you my tried and true take on how to do well in anything. Of course, your attitude is important, I've wrote about this before. So make sure you're positive, regardless of your studying approach. Okay, okay, on to the good stuff.

    1. Evaluate your study needs for the upcoming semester.

    Evaluate how you've done in similar courses in previous years. List your classes from most challenging to easiest based on how you've done in those subjects in the past. For me math is always at the top of that list. I know I need to dedicate more time to working math problems that I do writing a paper.

    2. The syllabus, it's a blueprint for success!

    When you get your syllabus make note of what is graded and the weight. Is attendance and participation 50% of your grade? Or is your grade made of tests only? You'll want to focus your attention to the highest weight, i.e. always speak up in class or study and ace the tests. Always know if supplemental instruction is offered for each course, what your instructors office hours are and where that office is. Office hours are there for a reason use them often. Even if it's to ask something you could find out from a class mate. Ask the instructor, besides, remember letters of recommendation are easier from professors to write if they know who you are!

    3. Have you been putting in the time?

    Evaluate how many hours a week you've studied in the past, did you ever get to a exam and groan that you should've studied more? Write down how much you studied and honestly evaluate if it was enough. A good rule of thumb for pre-reqs in 2 hours study time to 1 hour class time. 3 hours worth of lecture, study for 6 hours throughout the week. "Whoa, that's too much" read on, I've got tricks up my sleeve.

    4. Time suckers.

    Figure out your "Time Suckers", do you find yourself on facebook for hours or reading articles on Quora, measure this as if it were a study time so you can limit it in a later part

    5. Make a schedule based on your academic and personal needs.

    This is how I do it.. Take a schedule ( a sheet with 7 columns of days of the week and rows for every hour that your typically awake say 9am to 10pm) first write your classes and lab times down, these are #1. If you work record your schedule, if you commute record your travel time, record meal times if you have regular ones. Record any regularly scheduled personal commitments, dinner with mom on Sunday, date nights, taking the kids places. Lastly, add in your time suckers. If you know you'll get sucked into a 4 hour Netflix session on a saturday... write it down. We will leave NOTHING unaccounted for friends! Record any special things you want to do throughout the week, even if it's just coffee with a pal. 
Look over your schedule sheet, this is the time you now have available to study and take care of class assignments. 


On this handy little schedule you've just made yourself you've got paper gold. A schedule of your life, now to add in the studying.

    Preview


    Before each class schedule a preview of 5-30 minutes. (If you have 3 classes in a row (class a, class b, class c) study In order c,b,a) During the preview your goal is to check the syllabus to see what's going on in that class, review notes and textbook in accordance from the last class, and review your written assignments and problems. Make sure to proofread any assignments your turning in too as a last accuracy check (I can't tell you how many last minute mistakes I find in stuff!)


    Lecture


    Having done your "preview" you're now ready for your lecture. Listen, make notes, ask questions, recite and discuss. Always get involved in your lecture if you can. Even if no one else is talking. The biggest growth I've had as a student is not caring what other people thought of me. I don't care if I'm the "obnoxious girl that asks all the questions". Fact is, at the end of a lecture I'm walking away with the pieces of the puzzle that I was missing. The other great thing about the preview is if there is an impromptu quiz, you'll be ready


    Review


    I know, I know, reviewing too? But I just previewed! But this is a "sneaking in study" trick. After every class I review what I went over in lecture. It may seem silly to review the same day, but but going over the material again, despite how well you THINK you know it, I promise you more things will stick into your long term memory. I'm a visual learner so I summarize/ make a story out of the notes I just took in class. If you're auditory, I'd suggest listening to your lecture via a recorder, or going to a lab if you're tactile.

    Study


    Lastly, study! I study the night before each class. So if I have 2 lectures on a Monday I study for about an hour and a half just those two subjects. I use a study-reading method technique called SQ3R (The SQ3R Reading Method) that is awesome for reading through textbooks. I write down questions and personal reactions to the text for discussion in the next lecture. The neat thing about doing it this way is, say you have a bio lecture 3x a week and a bio lab. By previewing, reviewing and studying you're learning biology 16 times a week (4 previews, 4 lectures, 4 reviews, 4 study times) Instead of the traditional 8 times (4 lectures, 4 study periods). Cramming before a major test is replaced by quick previews and reviews. I also like to add in a weekly review of everything I learned the previous week on Friday nights, school is my job and I am taking it seriously enough to miss out on Friday happy hour with the buddies.

    Extra Credit: 
Persist in managing your study time!

    If you add/drop a class, change work hours, or develop a new hobby revise your schedule. Don't get discouraged if you don't make every preview/review, it's inevitable that other commitments may get in the way, but monitor if they're always getting In the way, they may be one of those time suckers I talked about. Whenever your grades go down, or you fall behind in your class assignments also re evaluate what you're spending your time on. I hope you all have an incredibly successful semester and continue to give your all to this crazy path we're taking together!

  • May 26

    It's that time again, the prerequisite and nursing school boards will be filling with new fall students. The most common questions I see are usually people feeling worried about some of the "harder" classes associated with the prerequisite and nursing curriculums. I find that it was never a subject that had me stumped, but more so, how I approached a subject. I went years trying to figure out what worked for me. I found some things worked in certain courses and failed miserably in other. (i.e. What do you mean I can't use flashcards for everything?!) Reading other peoples study tips have always helped me figure out my own study flow, so I want to give you my tried and true take on how to do well in anything. Of course, your attitude is important, I've wrote about this before. So make sure you're positive, regardless of your studying approach. Okay, okay, on to the good stuff.

    1. Evaluate your study needs for the upcoming semester.

    Evaluate how you've done in similar courses in previous years. List your classes from most challenging to easiest based on how you've done in those subjects in the past. For me math is always at the top of that list. I know I need to dedicate more time to working math problems that I do writing a paper.

    2. The syllabus, it's a blueprint for success!

    When you get your syllabus make note of what is graded and the weight. Is attendance and participation 50% of your grade? Or is your grade made of tests only? You'll want to focus your attention to the highest weight, i.e. always speak up in class or study and ace the tests. Always know if supplemental instruction is offered for each course, what your instructors office hours are and where that office is. Office hours are there for a reason use them often. Even if it's to ask something you could find out from a class mate. Ask the instructor, besides, remember letters of recommendation are easier from professors to write if they know who you are!

    3. Have you been putting in the time?

    Evaluate how many hours a week you've studied in the past, did you ever get to a exam and groan that you should've studied more? Write down how much you studied and honestly evaluate if it was enough. A good rule of thumb for pre-reqs in 2 hours study time to 1 hour class time. 3 hours worth of lecture, study for 6 hours throughout the week. "Whoa, that's too much" read on, I've got tricks up my sleeve.

    4. Time suckers.

    Figure out your "Time Suckers", do you find yourself on facebook for hours or reading articles on Quora, measure this as if it were a study time so you can limit it in a later part

    5. Make a schedule based on your academic and personal needs.

    This is how I do it.. Take a schedule ( a sheet with 7 columns of days of the week and rows for every hour that your typically awake say 9am to 10pm) first write your classes and lab times down, these are #1. If you work record your schedule, if you commute record your travel time, record meal times if you have regular ones. Record any regularly scheduled personal commitments, dinner with mom on Sunday, date nights, taking the kids places. Lastly, add in your time suckers. If you know you'll get sucked into a 4 hour Netflix session on a saturday... write it down. We will leave NOTHING unaccounted for friends! Record any special things you want to do throughout the week, even if it's just coffee with a pal. 
Look over your schedule sheet, this is the time you now have available to study and take care of class assignments. 


On this handy little schedule you've just made yourself you've got paper gold. A schedule of your life, now to add in the studying.

    Preview


    Before each class schedule a preview of 5-30 minutes. (If you have 3 classes in a row (class a, class b, class c) study In order c,b,a) During the preview your goal is to check the syllabus to see what's going on in that class, review notes and textbook in accordance from the last class, and review your written assignments and problems. Make sure to proofread any assignments your turning in too as a last accuracy check (I can't tell you how many last minute mistakes I find in stuff!)


    Lecture


    Having done your "preview" you're now ready for your lecture. Listen, make notes, ask questions, recite and discuss. Always get involved in your lecture if you can. Even if no one else is talking. The biggest growth I've had as a student is not caring what other people thought of me. I don't care if I'm the "obnoxious girl that asks all the questions". Fact is, at the end of a lecture I'm walking away with the pieces of the puzzle that I was missing. The other great thing about the preview is if there is an impromptu quiz, you'll be ready


    Review


    I know, I know, reviewing too? But I just previewed! But this is a "sneaking in study" trick. After every class I review what I went over in lecture. It may seem silly to review the same day, but but going over the material again, despite how well you THINK you know it, I promise you more things will stick into your long term memory. I'm a visual learner so I summarize/ make a story out of the notes I just took in class. If you're auditory, I'd suggest listening to your lecture via a recorder, or going to a lab if you're tactile.

    Study


    Lastly, study! I study the night before each class. So if I have 2 lectures on a Monday I study for about an hour and a half just those two subjects. I use a study-reading method technique called SQ3R (The SQ3R Reading Method) that is awesome for reading through textbooks. I write down questions and personal reactions to the text for discussion in the next lecture. The neat thing about doing it this way is, say you have a bio lecture 3x a week and a bio lab. By previewing, reviewing and studying you're learning biology 16 times a week (4 previews, 4 lectures, 4 reviews, 4 study times) Instead of the traditional 8 times (4 lectures, 4 study periods). Cramming before a major test is replaced by quick previews and reviews. I also like to add in a weekly review of everything I learned the previous week on Friday nights, school is my job and I am taking it seriously enough to miss out on Friday happy hour with the buddies.

    Extra Credit: 
Persist in managing your study time!

    If you add/drop a class, change work hours, or develop a new hobby revise your schedule. Don't get discouraged if you don't make every preview/review, it's inevitable that other commitments may get in the way, but monitor if they're always getting In the way, they may be one of those time suckers I talked about. Whenever your grades go down, or you fall behind in your class assignments also re evaluate what you're spending your time on. I hope you all have an incredibly successful semester and continue to give your all to this crazy path we're taking together!

  • May 12

    It's that time again, the prerequisite and nursing school boards will be filling with new fall students. The most common questions I see are usually people feeling worried about some of the "harder" classes associated with the prerequisite and nursing curriculums. I find that it was never a subject that had me stumped, but more so, how I approached a subject. I went years trying to figure out what worked for me. I found some things worked in certain courses and failed miserably in other. (i.e. What do you mean I can't use flashcards for everything?!) Reading other peoples study tips have always helped me figure out my own study flow, so I want to give you my tried and true take on how to do well in anything. Of course, your attitude is important, I've wrote about this before. So make sure you're positive, regardless of your studying approach. Okay, okay, on to the good stuff.

    1. Evaluate your study needs for the upcoming semester.

    Evaluate how you've done in similar courses in previous years. List your classes from most challenging to easiest based on how you've done in those subjects in the past. For me math is always at the top of that list. I know I need to dedicate more time to working math problems that I do writing a paper.

    2. The syllabus, it's a blueprint for success!

    When you get your syllabus make note of what is graded and the weight. Is attendance and participation 50% of your grade? Or is your grade made of tests only? You'll want to focus your attention to the highest weight, i.e. always speak up in class or study and ace the tests. Always know if supplemental instruction is offered for each course, what your instructors office hours are and where that office is. Office hours are there for a reason use them often. Even if it's to ask something you could find out from a class mate. Ask the instructor, besides, remember letters of recommendation are easier from professors to write if they know who you are!

    3. Have you been putting in the time?

    Evaluate how many hours a week you've studied in the past, did you ever get to a exam and groan that you should've studied more? Write down how much you studied and honestly evaluate if it was enough. A good rule of thumb for pre-reqs in 2 hours study time to 1 hour class time. 3 hours worth of lecture, study for 6 hours throughout the week. "Whoa, that's too much" read on, I've got tricks up my sleeve.

    4. Time suckers.

    Figure out your "Time Suckers", do you find yourself on facebook for hours or reading articles on Quora, measure this as if it were a study time so you can limit it in a later part

    5. Make a schedule based on your academic and personal needs.

    This is how I do it.. Take a schedule ( a sheet with 7 columns of days of the week and rows for every hour that your typically awake say 9am to 10pm) first write your classes and lab times down, these are #1. If you work record your schedule, if you commute record your travel time, record meal times if you have regular ones. Record any regularly scheduled personal commitments, dinner with mom on Sunday, date nights, taking the kids places. Lastly, add in your time suckers. If you know you'll get sucked into a 4 hour Netflix session on a saturday... write it down. We will leave NOTHING unaccounted for friends! Record any special things you want to do throughout the week, even if it's just coffee with a pal. 
Look over your schedule sheet, this is the time you now have available to study and take care of class assignments. 


On this handy little schedule you've just made yourself you've got paper gold. A schedule of your life, now to add in the studying.

    Preview


    Before each class schedule a preview of 5-30 minutes. (If you have 3 classes in a row (class a, class b, class c) study In order c,b,a) During the preview your goal is to check the syllabus to see what's going on in that class, review notes and textbook in accordance from the last class, and review your written assignments and problems. Make sure to proofread any assignments your turning in too as a last accuracy check (I can't tell you how many last minute mistakes I find in stuff!)


    Lecture


    Having done your "preview" you're now ready for your lecture. Listen, make notes, ask questions, recite and discuss. Always get involved in your lecture if you can. Even if no one else is talking. The biggest growth I've had as a student is not caring what other people thought of me. I don't care if I'm the "obnoxious girl that asks all the questions". Fact is, at the end of a lecture I'm walking away with the pieces of the puzzle that I was missing. The other great thing about the preview is if there is an impromptu quiz, you'll be ready


    Review


    I know, I know, reviewing too? But I just previewed! But this is a "sneaking in study" trick. After every class I review what I went over in lecture. It may seem silly to review the same day, but but going over the material again, despite how well you THINK you know it, I promise you more things will stick into your long term memory. I'm a visual learner so I summarize/ make a story out of the notes I just took in class. If you're auditory, I'd suggest listening to your lecture via a recorder, or going to a lab if you're tactile.

    Study


    Lastly, study! I study the night before each class. So if I have 2 lectures on a Monday I study for about an hour and a half just those two subjects. I use a study-reading method technique called SQ3R (The SQ3R Reading Method) that is awesome for reading through textbooks. I write down questions and personal reactions to the text for discussion in the next lecture. The neat thing about doing it this way is, say you have a bio lecture 3x a week and a bio lab. By previewing, reviewing and studying you're learning biology 16 times a week (4 previews, 4 lectures, 4 reviews, 4 study times) Instead of the traditional 8 times (4 lectures, 4 study periods). Cramming before a major test is replaced by quick previews and reviews. I also like to add in a weekly review of everything I learned the previous week on Friday nights, school is my job and I am taking it seriously enough to miss out on Friday happy hour with the buddies.

    Extra Credit: 
Persist in managing your study time!

    If you add/drop a class, change work hours, or develop a new hobby revise your schedule. Don't get discouraged if you don't make every preview/review, it's inevitable that other commitments may get in the way, but monitor if they're always getting In the way, they may be one of those time suckers I talked about. Whenever your grades go down, or you fall behind in your class assignments also re evaluate what you're spending your time on. I hope you all have an incredibly successful semester and continue to give your all to this crazy path we're taking together!

  • Apr 12

    It's that time again, the prerequisite and nursing school boards will be filling with new fall students. The most common questions I see are usually people feeling worried about some of the "harder" classes associated with the prerequisite and nursing curriculums. I find that it was never a subject that had me stumped, but more so, how I approached a subject. I went years trying to figure out what worked for me. I found some things worked in certain courses and failed miserably in other. (i.e. What do you mean I can't use flashcards for everything?!) Reading other peoples study tips have always helped me figure out my own study flow, so I want to give you my tried and true take on how to do well in anything. Of course, your attitude is important, I've wrote about this before. So make sure you're positive, regardless of your studying approach. Okay, okay, on to the good stuff.

    1. Evaluate your study needs for the upcoming semester.

    Evaluate how you've done in similar courses in previous years. List your classes from most challenging to easiest based on how you've done in those subjects in the past. For me math is always at the top of that list. I know I need to dedicate more time to working math problems that I do writing a paper.

    2. The syllabus, it's a blueprint for success!

    When you get your syllabus make note of what is graded and the weight. Is attendance and participation 50% of your grade? Or is your grade made of tests only? You'll want to focus your attention to the highest weight, i.e. always speak up in class or study and ace the tests. Always know if supplemental instruction is offered for each course, what your instructors office hours are and where that office is. Office hours are there for a reason use them often. Even if it's to ask something you could find out from a class mate. Ask the instructor, besides, remember letters of recommendation are easier from professors to write if they know who you are!

    3. Have you been putting in the time?

    Evaluate how many hours a week you've studied in the past, did you ever get to a exam and groan that you should've studied more? Write down how much you studied and honestly evaluate if it was enough. A good rule of thumb for pre-reqs in 2 hours study time to 1 hour class time. 3 hours worth of lecture, study for 6 hours throughout the week. "Whoa, that's too much" read on, I've got tricks up my sleeve.

    4. Time suckers.

    Figure out your "Time Suckers", do you find yourself on facebook for hours or reading articles on Quora, measure this as if it were a study time so you can limit it in a later part

    5. Make a schedule based on your academic and personal needs.

    This is how I do it.. Take a schedule ( a sheet with 7 columns of days of the week and rows for every hour that your typically awake say 9am to 10pm) first write your classes and lab times down, these are #1. If you work record your schedule, if you commute record your travel time, record meal times if you have regular ones. Record any regularly scheduled personal commitments, dinner with mom on Sunday, date nights, taking the kids places. Lastly, add in your time suckers. If you know you'll get sucked into a 4 hour Netflix session on a saturday... write it down. We will leave NOTHING unaccounted for friends! Record any special things you want to do throughout the week, even if it's just coffee with a pal. 
Look over your schedule sheet, this is the time you now have available to study and take care of class assignments. 


On this handy little schedule you've just made yourself you've got paper gold. A schedule of your life, now to add in the studying.

    Preview


    Before each class schedule a preview of 5-30 minutes. (If you have 3 classes in a row (class a, class b, class c) study In order c,b,a) During the preview your goal is to check the syllabus to see what's going on in that class, review notes and textbook in accordance from the last class, and review your written assignments and problems. Make sure to proofread any assignments your turning in too as a last accuracy check (I can't tell you how many last minute mistakes I find in stuff!)


    Lecture


    Having done your "preview" you're now ready for your lecture. Listen, make notes, ask questions, recite and discuss. Always get involved in your lecture if you can. Even if no one else is talking. The biggest growth I've had as a student is not caring what other people thought of me. I don't care if I'm the "obnoxious girl that asks all the questions". Fact is, at the end of a lecture I'm walking away with the pieces of the puzzle that I was missing. The other great thing about the preview is if there is an impromptu quiz, you'll be ready


    Review


    I know, I know, reviewing too? But I just previewed! But this is a "sneaking in study" trick. After every class I review what I went over in lecture. It may seem silly to review the same day, but but going over the material again, despite how well you THINK you know it, I promise you more things will stick into your long term memory. I'm a visual learner so I summarize/ make a story out of the notes I just took in class. If you're auditory, I'd suggest listening to your lecture via a recorder, or going to a lab if you're tactile.

    Study


    Lastly, study! I study the night before each class. So if I have 2 lectures on a Monday I study for about an hour and a half just those two subjects. I use a study-reading method technique called SQ3R (The SQ3R Reading Method) that is awesome for reading through textbooks. I write down questions and personal reactions to the text for discussion in the next lecture. The neat thing about doing it this way is, say you have a bio lecture 3x a week and a bio lab. By previewing, reviewing and studying you're learning biology 16 times a week (4 previews, 4 lectures, 4 reviews, 4 study times) Instead of the traditional 8 times (4 lectures, 4 study periods). Cramming before a major test is replaced by quick previews and reviews. I also like to add in a weekly review of everything I learned the previous week on Friday nights, school is my job and I am taking it seriously enough to miss out on Friday happy hour with the buddies.

    Extra Credit: 
Persist in managing your study time!

    If you add/drop a class, change work hours, or develop a new hobby revise your schedule. Don't get discouraged if you don't make every preview/review, it's inevitable that other commitments may get in the way, but monitor if they're always getting In the way, they may be one of those time suckers I talked about. Whenever your grades go down, or you fall behind in your class assignments also re evaluate what you're spending your time on. I hope you all have an incredibly successful semester and continue to give your all to this crazy path we're taking together!

  • Dec 17 '15

    I'd say the pre-reqs. Your dedication to succeeding in the pre-reqs. That's a good indicator.

  • Dec 1 '15

    If I were you I'd buy Fundamentals Reviews and Rationales by Mary Hogan and if your school uses ATI for benchmark exams, I'd get a copy of the Fundamentals book for that as well. NCLEX questions would be good if you read through all the rationales, but most of the content wouldn't make sense yet to you anyways without the info from lecture.

  • Nov 13 '15

    It's that time again, the prerequisite and nursing school boards will be filling with new fall students. The most common questions I see are usually people feeling worried about some of the "harder" classes associated with the prerequisite and nursing curriculums. I find that it was never a subject that had me stumped, but more so, how I approached a subject. I went years trying to figure out what worked for me. I found some things worked in certain courses and failed miserably in other. (i.e. What do you mean I can't use flashcards for everything?!) Reading other peoples study tips have always helped me figure out my own study flow, so I want to give you my tried and true take on how to do well in anything. Of course, your attitude is important, I've wrote about this before. So make sure you're positive, regardless of your studying approach. Okay, okay, on to the good stuff.

    1. Evaluate your study needs for the upcoming semester.

    Evaluate how you've done in similar courses in previous years. List your classes from most challenging to easiest based on how you've done in those subjects in the past. For me math is always at the top of that list. I know I need to dedicate more time to working math problems that I do writing a paper.

    2. The syllabus, it's a blueprint for success!

    When you get your syllabus make note of what is graded and the weight. Is attendance and participation 50% of your grade? Or is your grade made of tests only? You'll want to focus your attention to the highest weight, i.e. always speak up in class or study and ace the tests. Always know if supplemental instruction is offered for each course, what your instructors office hours are and where that office is. Office hours are there for a reason use them often. Even if it's to ask something you could find out from a class mate. Ask the instructor, besides, remember letters of recommendation are easier from professors to write if they know who you are!

    3. Have you been putting in the time?

    Evaluate how many hours a week you've studied in the past, did you ever get to a exam and groan that you should've studied more? Write down how much you studied and honestly evaluate if it was enough. A good rule of thumb for pre-reqs in 2 hours study time to 1 hour class time. 3 hours worth of lecture, study for 6 hours throughout the week. "Whoa, that's too much" read on, I've got tricks up my sleeve.

    4. Time suckers.

    Figure out your "Time Suckers", do you find yourself on facebook for hours or reading articles on Quora, measure this as if it were a study time so you can limit it in a later part

    5. Make a schedule based on your academic and personal needs.

    This is how I do it.. Take a schedule ( a sheet with 7 columns of days of the week and rows for every hour that your typically awake say 9am to 10pm) first write your classes and lab times down, these are #1. If you work record your schedule, if you commute record your travel time, record meal times if you have regular ones. Record any regularly scheduled personal commitments, dinner with mom on Sunday, date nights, taking the kids places. Lastly, add in your time suckers. If you know you'll get sucked into a 4 hour Netflix session on a saturday... write it down. We will leave NOTHING unaccounted for friends! Record any special things you want to do throughout the week, even if it's just coffee with a pal. 
Look over your schedule sheet, this is the time you now have available to study and take care of class assignments. 


On this handy little schedule you've just made yourself you've got paper gold. A schedule of your life, now to add in the studying.

    Preview


    Before each class schedule a preview of 5-30 minutes. (If you have 3 classes in a row (class a, class b, class c) study In order c,b,a) During the preview your goal is to check the syllabus to see what's going on in that class, review notes and textbook in accordance from the last class, and review your written assignments and problems. Make sure to proofread any assignments your turning in too as a last accuracy check (I can't tell you how many last minute mistakes I find in stuff!)


    Lecture


    Having done your "preview" you're now ready for your lecture. Listen, make notes, ask questions, recite and discuss. Always get involved in your lecture if you can. Even if no one else is talking. The biggest growth I've had as a student is not caring what other people thought of me. I don't care if I'm the "obnoxious girl that asks all the questions". Fact is, at the end of a lecture I'm walking away with the pieces of the puzzle that I was missing. The other great thing about the preview is if there is an impromptu quiz, you'll be ready


    Review


    I know, I know, reviewing too? But I just previewed! But this is a "sneaking in study" trick. After every class I review what I went over in lecture. It may seem silly to review the same day, but but going over the material again, despite how well you THINK you know it, I promise you more things will stick into your long term memory. I'm a visual learner so I summarize/ make a story out of the notes I just took in class. If you're auditory, I'd suggest listening to your lecture via a recorder, or going to a lab if you're tactile.

    Study


    Lastly, study! I study the night before each class. So if I have 2 lectures on a Monday I study for about an hour and a half just those two subjects. I use a study-reading method technique called SQ3R (The SQ3R Reading Method) that is awesome for reading through textbooks. I write down questions and personal reactions to the text for discussion in the next lecture. The neat thing about doing it this way is, say you have a bio lecture 3x a week and a bio lab. By previewing, reviewing and studying you're learning biology 16 times a week (4 previews, 4 lectures, 4 reviews, 4 study times) Instead of the traditional 8 times (4 lectures, 4 study periods). Cramming before a major test is replaced by quick previews and reviews. I also like to add in a weekly review of everything I learned the previous week on Friday nights, school is my job and I am taking it seriously enough to miss out on Friday happy hour with the buddies.

    Extra Credit: 
Persist in managing your study time!

    If you add/drop a class, change work hours, or develop a new hobby revise your schedule. Don't get discouraged if you don't make every preview/review, it's inevitable that other commitments may get in the way, but monitor if they're always getting In the way, they may be one of those time suckers I talked about. Whenever your grades go down, or you fall behind in your class assignments also re evaluate what you're spending your time on. I hope you all have an incredibly successful semester and continue to give your all to this crazy path we're taking together!

  • Aug 14 '15

    From a very real place a 2.7 gpa doesn't show that you had a strong handle on the material in your pre reqs. If you just barely scraped by on the easiest part of your education, it make hurt you. But hopefully you get in.

  • Jul 28 '15

    I see that everyone has already dragged you, but I just have to say this is the stupidest thing I have ever read. "I was doing grunt work." Pssh, did you think you'd be handing out lollipops?!

  • Jul 28 '15

    I see that everyone has already dragged you, but I just have to say this is the stupidest thing I have ever read. "I was doing grunt work." Pssh, did you think you'd be handing out lollipops?!

  • Jul 21 '15

    Pep talk time! I want to touch on 2 things in this post for you. Both the A&P fail and the undecided major thing.

    My parents wanted me to be a lawyer. I don't want to be a lawyer, and while the job prospects are good in my area, I know being a lawyer wouldn't make me happy. So while parents suggest things sometimes because of a 'good job prospect' if your hearts not in it, your mind won't be either.

    It seems like you identified that you failed because you were busy worrying about other majors. I've done this in the past, this semester I got a B instead of straight A's because every time I went to that class I worried about next semester. Best advice I can give you, don't live in the future, live in the now. Panicking and thinking about all the different majors you could take won't help you in any major if you fail a class.

    If you still want it, you can definitely get into nursing school. You just have to retake the class. I truly thing if you passed organic chem you can pass A&P. However, don't go into nursing half heartedly or comparing yourself to other people. You're not other people and other people have a different story that you, a different educational background. Do YOUR best, chase YOUR dream.

    I can't answer your question for you, if you should switch majors. You will succeed in the major your happy in. You'll do great in what moves you and what you love, not what anyone says you should do. I'd do a little self questioning over the break and ask what you want? If it's a paycheck, nursing may not be for you. If it's to change peoples lives and advocate for whats in the best interest of your patient, then I'd just retake A&P and buck up little camper!

    Good luck in whatever decision you make

  • Jul 16 '15

    In my clinical group of 8 we were split in half (4/4) to take a 30 minute lunch and would have to leave our patients with one of the other student nurses. In that 30 min we could do whatever for lunch, eat a lunch we brought or go purchase one from cafe or outside hospital.

    My instructor rarely came with us to lunch, but when they did it was a great opportunity to ask questions, discuss what has gone wrong/right in the day, and get good feedback.

    I will note that though I was always "guaranteed" a lunch break, I would often choose to work through it if that was allowed. With my luck I know something exciting will happen if I go to lunch and I didn't want to miss any opportunities to learn something different.

  • Jul 16 '15

    In my clinical group of 8 we were split in half (4/4) to take a 30 minute lunch and would have to leave our patients with one of the other student nurses. In that 30 min we could do whatever for lunch, eat a lunch we brought or go purchase one from cafe or outside hospital.

    My instructor rarely came with us to lunch, but when they did it was a great opportunity to ask questions, discuss what has gone wrong/right in the day, and get good feedback.

    I will note that though I was always "guaranteed" a lunch break, I would often choose to work through it if that was allowed. With my luck I know something exciting will happen if I go to lunch and I didn't want to miss any opportunities to learn something different.

  • Jul 15 '15

    I see that everyone has already dragged you, but I just have to say this is the stupidest thing I have ever read. "I was doing grunt work." Pssh, did you think you'd be handing out lollipops?!


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