Latest Likes For CherylRNBSN

Latest Likes For CherylRNBSN

CherylRNBSN 4,464 Views

Joined Mar 30, '12. Posts: 184 (56% Liked) Likes: 347

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  • Feb 17

    Um, this article seems a bit over the top to me. Medical professionals are predatory, smell blood, etc.? I've been a nurse for over twenty years. That is way over the top.

    As many other posters have said, the way you precept, and your attitude, your leadership style may be a great match for some orientees.

    But not for me.

    I don't think anyone needs to be "broken down" in order to reach their full potential.

    And it's kind of condescending to think all new nurses need to be petted and coddled, and it is your job to toughen them up and show them how the real world is.

    I, and many others, were well equipped with enough innate intelligence that we already possessed some pretty good critical thinking skills before we ever even started nursing school, and also realize we have an intrinsic responsibility for our own professional growth and development.

    I look at new grads and nursing students as colleagues. I do not try to intimidate them. I get to know them as a person on some level; i.e., ask them when they are graduating, their future career goals, etc. I respect them, and they respect me. I freely tell them everything I know. I assure them there are no stupid questions. That knowing what one does not know is a cornerstone of safe practice.

    Positive, healthy interactions with all coworkers go a long way in making tough shifts bearable, even enjoyable.

    Support, teamwork, respect, sharing of knowledge, modeling leadership, and yes, KINDNESS. Despite whatever else is going on in my personal or work life.

    So I don't worry about my orientees speaking about their experience with me as a preceptor with other staff.

  • Feb 17

    Um, this article seems a bit over the top to me. Medical professionals are predatory, smell blood, etc.? I've been a nurse for over twenty years. That is way over the top.

    As many other posters have said, the way you precept, and your attitude, your leadership style may be a great match for some orientees.

    But not for me.

    I don't think anyone needs to be "broken down" in order to reach their full potential.

    And it's kind of condescending to think all new nurses need to be petted and coddled, and it is your job to toughen them up and show them how the real world is.

    I, and many others, were well equipped with enough innate intelligence that we already possessed some pretty good critical thinking skills before we ever even started nursing school, and also realize we have an intrinsic responsibility for our own professional growth and development.

    I look at new grads and nursing students as colleagues. I do not try to intimidate them. I get to know them as a person on some level; i.e., ask them when they are graduating, their future career goals, etc. I respect them, and they respect me. I freely tell them everything I know. I assure them there are no stupid questions. That knowing what one does not know is a cornerstone of safe practice.

    Positive, healthy interactions with all coworkers go a long way in making tough shifts bearable, even enjoyable.

    Support, teamwork, respect, sharing of knowledge, modeling leadership, and yes, KINDNESS. Despite whatever else is going on in my personal or work life.

    So I don't worry about my orientees speaking about their experience with me as a preceptor with other staff.

  • Jan 20

    I was just hired at the ONE hospital I really wanted to work at. THey had a max of 5 positions to apply for. So I applied for five. As my status changed to "no longer under consideration", I simply applied for another.

  • Dec 2 '15

    Um, this article seems a bit over the top to me. Medical professionals are predatory, smell blood, etc.? I've been a nurse for over twenty years. That is way over the top.

    As many other posters have said, the way you precept, and your attitude, your leadership style may be a great match for some orientees.

    But not for me.

    I don't think anyone needs to be "broken down" in order to reach their full potential.

    And it's kind of condescending to think all new nurses need to be petted and coddled, and it is your job to toughen them up and show them how the real world is.

    I, and many others, were well equipped with enough innate intelligence that we already possessed some pretty good critical thinking skills before we ever even started nursing school, and also realize we have an intrinsic responsibility for our own professional growth and development.

    I look at new grads and nursing students as colleagues. I do not try to intimidate them. I get to know them as a person on some level; i.e., ask them when they are graduating, their future career goals, etc. I respect them, and they respect me. I freely tell them everything I know. I assure them there are no stupid questions. That knowing what one does not know is a cornerstone of safe practice.

    Positive, healthy interactions with all coworkers go a long way in making tough shifts bearable, even enjoyable.

    Support, teamwork, respect, sharing of knowledge, modeling leadership, and yes, KINDNESS. Despite whatever else is going on in my personal or work life.

    So I don't worry about my orientees speaking about their experience with me as a preceptor with other staff.

  • Oct 19 '15

    Quote from ChristineN
    My worst job interview was when the interviewer asked me if I was married or had kids as it is always more difficult to accommodate the schedule needs of nurses with families.
    Isn't that ILLEGAL?

    RUN for the door.

  • Oct 10 '15

    Please do not take what I am about to say as ANYTHING but constructive criticism.

    Your frustration is palpable, and I do not want to add to it.

    First, you need to SLOW DOWN. Think before you act! Think before you type! This site has clear recommendation of no text speak. It makes your post difficult to read. Take time to gather your thoughts. You will get better advice. Compose yourself, take a deep breath, and proceed w care and caution.

    Next, you have to follow the rules. I cannot imagine using a cell phone during a career make-or-break exam. If the issue was emergent, you should have gotten up and spoken w Proctor BEFORE taking the call.

    Were you just not thinking? Why did you do that? I am sure the Board is or has asked you that question.

    When you deal with the Board, you have got to appear pulled together.

    Good luck.



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