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OnlybyHisgraceRN 13,105 Views

Joined Mar 29, '12. Posts: 755 (52% Liked) Likes: 1,440

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  • Jun 22 '13

    I would go straight to the uniform shop and buy some new Greys Anatomy, a new stethoscope, pay for my certification exam, all compliments of such a joyful place to work......hey, at least I'm keeping it work-related

  • Jun 22 '13

    A co-worker was brought to the NM's office one morning, and she was told that payroll had been overpaying her throughout the year, and they would be deducting (in installments) $5,000 from her future paychecks. She was busy preparing for her wedding in the next few months, and she was CRUSHED. She told me that she never looked at her paycheck stubs; she simply trusted that it was correct.

    Poor girl worked crazy overtime to make up the difference since she needed money for her wedding. I learned a valuable lesson:look at your pay stubs!

  • Feb 12 '13

    We do it all the time in my ED cause we get pulled away in the middle of things for emergencies.

  • Jan 11 '13
  • Jan 11 '13

    Maybe we can brainstorm and discuss some possilble solutions to this issue here.

  • Jan 11 '13

    AN is not suggesting anything We are simply sharing this petition and letting people know it exist, no endorsement was intended. I'll edit the original post to indicate that we are not endorsing it.

  • Jan 11 '13

    Last night was my first night of on-the-floor orientation for my first RN job, obviously a long term care facility since I'm posting here. I'm thankful to have had this board to scour before starting, so I had some idea of what I'll be facing. I'm fortunate that my facility appears to be wonderful by comparison with so many. The turnover among nurses appears to be very low, and many were CNAs before becoming nurses. I'll have four WEEKs of orientation before I'm on my own. After nursing school clinicals, it was weird to just pull and give meds on my own. (Not on my own in a scary way, my preceptor had watched me pull them and was around if I needed anything- just felt very independent) I was reminded that I still stink at lung sounds, and I know I've got a big learning curve ahead of me, but I think this will work out. When it was time to chart, I had to look at it again after I signed my name and then, RN.

    So thanks for all the advice and support, even if you didn't know you provided it, and I wish you all the very best.

  • Jan 10 '13

    Quote from Sassy5d
    Every day is different. You never know what's going to happen. Thankfully even the hardest pt is usually only in your care for a few hours
    Haha that's actually one of the things I was looking forward to was getting rid of those crazies after a few hours. The ones I have to take care of for 12 hours straight, 3 days in a row sometimes, for weeks on end! Now, I know you still see a lot of them in the ER, even frequent fliers, but it's different than having the same physically/verbally abusive patient all shift. At least you get a break from him AND at least we have security in our ED at all times!

  • Jan 9 '13

    I have been attending Walden for my BSN and love it. I'll be finished in the Spring and debating doing the MSN for NP. It's not too overwhelming online since I can work on assignments whenI have a day off. I work full time and have 3 kids at home. Haven't had any issues with Walden though.

  • Jan 9 '13

    What you are experiencing is typical of the "competent" phase of nursing expertise development. You might want to review the "Novice to Expert" model by Patricia Benner.

    You have mastered the basic tasks of your role and feel that you can handle the job with no special problems. That's a good thing. Recognize it for what it is and take a breather for a little bit. Then decide how you want your career to progress from here. You have several options. Take a little time and think about them carefully before jumping into something new that might be a disaster.

    1. You could choose to become an expert in adult med/surg nursing. Go to some conferences, learn more about that specialty in depth. Get certified in the clinical care of adult med/surg patients. That would be a good idea if you hope to stay in adult med/surg nursing. Are there certain aspects of patient care that interest you more than others -- or types of patients? Maybe that is a clue as to what expertise you might want to develop -- or an advanced role you might want to explore.

    2. Branch out and explore other roles related to your current job -- such as preceptor or charge nurse. Are there unit committees that you could join? Hospital-wide committees? Are there projects that could use your help? Participation in those types of activities are good ways to help you learn the bigger picture of health care -- while building upon the knowledge you already and adding skills that may help you later. Such activities also give you a chance to see what types of other nursing activities you might enjoy. For example, if you really enjoy precepting new orientees and/or students, you might enjoy an educational role. If you like being in charge and/or working on some sort of change project, you might enjoy a management role some day. Finally, working on these types of things expands your goups of colleagues. You get to know people better who might be able to help you find/secure your next job. Find out about their jobs (e.g. patient educators, staff development educators, program coordinators, performance improvement specialists, case managers, etc.) The more people you know -- and the more roles you become familiar with -- the better able you will be to find the right fit for you.

    3. Become active in a nursing organization. You might get a lot of the same benefits as you can get from #2 above.

    But don't just quit your job and jump to another specialty unless you are really unhappy with the specialty (or job) that you are now in. In a totally new specialty, you will be a beginner again and have a lot to learn. That might be interesting for a while, but soon, you will become competent there and face the same issues you are facing now. People who jump from job to job like that don't move up or forward in their career, they just get frustrated as they face the same problems repeatedly in a variet of different places. Take the time to explore and then choose a career direction before you "quit your day job" if possible. Explore possibilities first by trying a few things out (as you seem to be doing with this post) -- and then make a well-informed choice about the next phase of your career.

  • Jan 9 '13

    I was an LPN prior to RN. I've worked in various settings, many high pressure/stress in their own right, of course not ER. I don't work in a trauma center. Just a small community hospital, 23 beds or so with a fast track. I've been at this job just over 3 months. I'm sure I've said/done/reacted oddly to situations.

    Being the 'newbie' is very frustrating. We are well aware that it's a bother to be precepted and oriented. It's very uncomfortable most times.

    With that being said, and I know this isn't the point of this thread.. Try to cut some newbies a little slack.

    This was an issue at my job this week. With flu issue on top of the regular high volume of non-emergent visits.. It can be frustrating to even the most seasoned nurse.

    I found myself wearing down yesterday, no pee, no snacks, no break or food for 12 hours. Verbal abuse and demanding non-ill patients and family members, I was worn out. I made a snide remark at work and I was looked at like I just shot someone's kitten.. The response was like "you're new, what the hell do you know about anything and you're not gonna survive here if that's how you feel" like I'm too new to be frustrated.

  • Jan 9 '13

    Every day is different. You never know what's going to happen. Thankfully even the hardest pt is usually only in your care for a few hours

  • Jan 9 '13

    Quote from Sassy5d
    If you like new and unusual.. That's the ER. It's def more of a thinking on your feet vs brain sheets and organized tasks. You can't write down to do lists. You just kinda roll with it. Many ER visits are not true emergencies but you still do as much as you can as quickly as you can because things change in an instant.. Start getting behind and then a full arrest comes rolling in.

    I would request a shadow experience before you accept the position. 3 days at least at different times so you can get a feel for the flow. Explain you'd like to see for yourself before you commit, save everyone time.
    Thanks for the advice. I do have a job shadow set up for tomorrow. It's only 4 hours. The NM suggested 2 hours, but I asked for more. Then, once I start, I have 30 days to trial the position and if I'm not happy I can take back my old position, which is nice. I'm just trying to get any info I can on it now, so that I don't waste anyone's time, like you said. Thanks again.

  • Jan 9 '13

    Quote from N1colina
    Hi everyone. I just had an interview in the ED at the hospital I currently work at. The job is mine if I decide to pursue it (it was a bid). Now I'm not quite sure if I want it! Fact is I don't know what I want to do my career right now. I'm at a standstill I feel like. I've been a nurse for 6 1/2 years and I have tried LTC/Rehab, Family practice, and now my current position is in the hospital on a med/surg, ortho/neuro floor. It's all been great experience and I don't regret a thing, but I wish I could just find my niche! It's not that I've been completely miserable at all of these places (just the LTC) it's just I'm always seeking change or something better I suppose. I don't know what exactly I'm asking for here.... Maybe just some support or to hear from others that came across the same problem a few years into nursing. Thanks!
    Sorry- I kind of rambled on here and got off track. My point was I don't know if the ER is for me because the only reason I bid on it was because I want to learn more. I am always looking for a challenge, and always like to keep busy while at work. That's why I chose the 5p-5a shift in the ED! I know it will be great experience but I'm just worried I won't like the whole structure of it! I tend to be very anal and organized and the ED just seems so unorganized because it has to be! I don't know if I can deal with that...

  • Jan 9 '13

    This is my brain sheet:


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