Content That Barnstormin' PMHNP Likes

Content That Barnstormin' PMHNP Likes

Barnstormin' PMHNP, NP 7,338 Views

Joined Mar 8, '12. Posts: 325 (65% Liked) Likes: 844

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  • Jun 29

    Quote from Lisa.fnp
    My Sister-in-law is a Psychologist and attained her master degree from an online program.
    The Dictionary defines Psychologist;
    Quote: A psychologist is a professional who evaluates and studies behavior and mental processes[1] (see also psychology). Typically, psychologists must have completed a university degree in psychology, which is a master's degree.
    End of Quote.

    A psychiatrist. Now that's another story. I stand by my statement.
    Most states don't allow individuals with a master's to be licenced as a psychologist. Thus, if your SIL refers to herself as a psychologist it's likely shorthand for something else. In the US a doctoral degree is considered the entry to practice degree.

    Also, truncating a quote because the last few words weaken its support for your position is fairly dishonest.

  • Jun 29

    I was a psych RN for years. In addition to passing a few meds I did group and individual therapy, crisis intervention, suicide assessment, and all manner of milieu and staff management. At many times I was the only RN on, and therefore responsible for the full department. Being a psych RN (which I did right out of my BSN program) will be critical to being a PMHNP. Quality nursing is not just about skills (those can be learned, forgotten, retaught) but organization, critical thinking, and constant assessment. These can be honed in any setting, and are applicable to any career.

  • Jun 29

    Quote from Lisa.fnp
    If you really want to go the easy route become a PA or a Psychologist.
    As an RN and the mother of a fourth year clinical psychology Ph.D student who has been working her tail off for 8 years post-high school and still has several years to go before she has completed all of her requirements, I can say without reservation that there is nothing "easy" about becoming a psychologist.

  • Jun 29

    Do you realize that psych patients also have medical problems which may still need to be addressed while in an inpatient unit? They may have diabetes, hypertension, a colostomy bag, or any other number of problems which the psych NURSE will be responsible for addressing. They may be taking psychiatric meds that have the potential to cause serious physical adverse reactions. If the NP has actual experience with and competence in patient assessment and delivery of nursing care, she will be a better NP than one who only has theory to revert to when addressing the patient's needs (that may go well beyond the psychiatric).

  • Jun 27

    I don't think there is any right or wrong as people seem to be viewing this.

    If you are miserable and you are changing to something else that sounds like a reasonable and healthy thing to do. Good luck in your future endeavors and please come back and let us know how it is going. I hope it is really good for you.

  • Jun 27

    Quote from lallajo
    Boy, talk about nursing "eating their young!" Why are you guys busting on the OP for writing about how she's feeling? Are all you "I never bring my work home with me, me and my husband have the perfect arrangement because I know I don't need to be with him 24 hours a day, I put on my happy face every single day for my patient's" really that perfect, or are you just unable to admit the truth like the OP did? After 11 years as a Paramedic, and 4 years as a nurse, I totally get where he or she is coming from. Not because I'm a terrible person, or because I have mental health problems, or whatever other reasons you people came up with for why they MUST be feeling that way; maybe it's just how they feel. Healthcare right now is in a terrible, terrible state, and it's only getting worse. It is emotionally, physically and mentally exhausting, and admin, in general, doesn't give a crap, becaue they aren't the ones in the trenches dealing with the bull****. After 15 years, I'm getting out too, and it's all because of the general attitude in health care right now, and some of you on here are a perfect example of that. I have more self-worth than to be spit on, swung at, swore at, or treated like a maid, etc, etc, the rest of my life, in the name of an "A+" survey score!! How about climb off your high horse, and have a little empathy for a fellow healthcare worker, instead of tearing them to shreds. Or how about this, if you don't like what they have to say, keep scrolling.....End rant!!

    Thank you for your support 😀.This is is the attitude of 80% of people I've worked with as a nurse. Rude, nasty and sarcastic. I'm glad these people work in environments where they have zero unrealistic demands placed on them. Maybe some of these negative posters should have taken a hint and left nursing awhile ago because this is the same negativity I don't want to become my personality and reality.

  • Jun 27

    Getting away from the bedside nursing is the best thing a nurse could do. I encourage every single nurse to go back to school and continue their education. To be a care provider as a NP. Well you just don't experience such problems.

  • Jun 27

    Boy, talk about nursing "eating their young!" Why are you guys busting on the OP for writing about how she's feeling? Are all you "I never bring my work home with me, me and my husband have the perfect arrangement because I know I don't need to be with him 24 hours a day, I put on my happy face every single day for my patient's" really that perfect, or are you just unable to admit the truth like the OP did? After 11 years as a Paramedic, and 4 years as a nurse, I totally get where he or she is coming from. Not because I'm a terrible person, or because I have mental health problems, or whatever other reasons you people came up with for why they MUST be feeling that way; maybe it's just how they feel. Healthcare right now is in a terrible, terrible state, and it's only getting worse. It is emotionally, physically and mentally exhausting, and admin, in general, doesn't give a crap, becaue they aren't the ones in the trenches dealing with the bull****. After 15 years, I'm getting out too, and it's all because of the general attitude in health care right now, and some of you on here are a perfect example of that. I have more self-worth than to be spit on, swung at, swore at, or treated like a maid, etc, etc, the rest of my life, in the name of an "A+" survey score!! How about climb off your high horse, and have a little empathy for a fellow healthcare worker, instead of tearing them to shreds. Or how about this, if you don't like what they have to say, keep scrolling.....End rant!!

  • Jun 27

    Quote from jrwest
    I dont see how CM is going to not deal with families. They want nursing care in their home for the pt, or to pick and choose which facility they go to, or home care agency, or what services they will get , bla bla bla.
    I recently entered case management after a decade of inglorious direct patient care. It makes a refreshing difference when you deal with families for only a few minutes at a time rather than all shift long.

  • Jun 27

    Quote from Deebuzz
    Yes I would but on a different level, I won't be providing direct patient care. I don't mind going the the motions of dealing with people. I hate the direct contact I have with nasty patients who don't give a crap about their health and family members in my face at the bedside asking a million questions as if I have time to sit and talk and counsel them. CM is a different perspective so I'm hoping I'll like it.
    I have worked with some dedicated Case Mgrs, some who fiercely advocated for their patients and I respected them for that. To be a good and effective Case Mgr trusted by fearful anxious self destructive patients, often with some form of mental illness (the healthy good self cares with abundant resources aren't usually the ones who need a case Mgr) you have to care about the well-being of often difficult people and youwill need persuasive soft skills to get things accomplished working with burned out staff.

  • Jun 27

    I hate nursing, never thought I would say that but after 1.5yrs of working as a floor RN I know this crap is not for me. This job will suck the living life out of you. Your emotional, physical and mental health will suffer along with your family life. I have finally decided to leave the bedside and I've never felt so happy. At only 25 I felt like I was going to be stuck in this state for the rest of my working life but I found the courage to finally make the decision that saved my health and my marriage. I went into nursing with the intention of helping people and being the one to make a difference to those who may feel hopeless. All my intentions were quickly shut down when I started working on the floor. We deal with some unappreciative, sarcastic, rude, egotistical, ******* (patients, family members,physicians,coworkers and managers). There is no care in nursing just bottom line concerns. My first nursing job was ok, I worked in ND at the time, I moved to FL and that gave me the green light to officially leave floor nursing. I hate the anxious feeling before every shift, the nagging family members, pts who are rude self entitled, coworkers who throw eachother under the bus, physicians who disregard concerns, and a whole lot of other things I can elaborate about that is just downright aweful. I'm glad to say my degree didn't completly go to waste as I am now a RN case manager. I believe being away from the bedside will renew my interest. I refuse to live a day dreading having to go to work, nursing has literally changed how I respond to people, before I use to smile at everyone now I walk pass people with my face looking like a pit bull ready to bite. Whenever someone would tell me to smile I though, "wow I have changed for the worst" I refuse to be a martyr for this profession. Taking care of myself is more important than risking it for people who **** on theirs.

  • Jun 22

    I was top of my class in nursing school and had lots of people that wanted to be "study buddies," aka, wanted free tutoring. I quickly learned the phrase "I study best on my own. In a quiet place." Don't give an inch to people who want a mile.

  • Jun 22

    And, yep, I experienced precisely all that, being seen as free-for-all-who -cares educational support. I usually said that it is ok but I charge $25/hour for private tutoring, cash only. After that, the talk either stopped, or I'd got some $$ for my efforts. Being free from any possibility of repeating that type of experience was one of the reasons I picked up online program for my grad studies.

  • Jun 22

    Quote from madricka
    Some people on this forum actually have BPD and are well-aware of what people think of them. It's extremely difficult to get effective treatment and even harder to find compassionate people to provide it. Hence, many people with BPD do not even bother seeking treatment and never get better. Which is sad since there ARE effective treatments available.
    They are not behaving this way to annoy you. Their pain and anxiety is so bad they would rather be dead and have NO way to cope with what is going on inside of them. It's like walking around with no skin. Many have endured horrific events in their lives & have serious comorbidities (like complex ptsd). They are coming to you for help, they NEED you. Let them trust you because right now they don't and honestly, I don't blame them.
    As I have said ad nauseam, I understand that they have a disease! I am not blaming them - dealing with them frustrates me.

    Here's an example - if you've ever had to potty train a child...well, it's very frustrating. You want to give up. You still love the child, you don't BLAME the child, but there is nothing wrong with being frustrated about it and venting to other parents. Of course the child can't help his or her situation, and need you for help. And you can provide it. But just as mothers aren't saints and martyrs, neither should be nurses.

    And you have no idea if these individuals trust me. You don't know if I have family members and friends with BPD. You no nothing of my history with mental health, nor an inkling of my nursing or therapeutic skills.

  • Jun 22

    Sweet Jesus. Historically, a general practitioner was someone without a specialty and used to be synonymous with family practice. Your PCP used to be called your GP. Since family practice became a specialty in the 1970s the term GP has fallen out of favor, but generally speaking if someone refers to "general practice" they most often mean family practice or internal medicine (that is, treating a wide array of diseases across multiple organ systems, both acute and chronic). It's not a preferred term, but I doubt the PP meant it pejoratively.


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