Latest Comments by DesertSky

Latest Comments by DesertSky

DesertSky, BSN, RN 1,637 Views

Joined Feb 21, '12. DesertSky is a Critical Care RN. Posts: 32 (34% Liked) Likes: 14

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  • 0

    Thank you to everyone for their great replies and words of wisdom. I really appreciate your help. I definitely have some things to consider before making the move

  • 0

    Quote from Bobjohnny
    Not being phenomenal at starting IVs doesn't matter, you'll get plenty of practice. If you're really concerned about, depending on facility policy, see if you can IV ultrasound trained and/or IO trained. When somebody comes in from the field and its a basic crew, nothing beats an IO for insertion speed.

    Typically ICU & ICU stepdown nurses can make the clinical transition pretty well. They usually have the critical care knowledge and don't need to be taught a lot of stuff (vents, art lines, etc.). I have seen a couple struggle with remembering every patient isn't swirling the toilet when they first transfer. This typically gets rectified fairly quickly.

    I've also seen somebody struggle with the organized chaos and lack of routine in ED. Since ICU already responds to all of the traumas you probably have some idea of this. But, I just mention it because I have seen people struggle with the lack of having a routine.
    Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply. Glad to hear my so-so IV skills will get lots of practice in the ER. No better way to learn than practice and watching expert ER nurses in action.

    I did consider the chaos the ER and know that it will be a change from the ICU. Of course I am used to being busy with critical patients circling the drain and coding, but I know the ER is a different kind of busy with multiple new admits and the unknown of not knowing what will roll through the door next. Any advice for how to flip my time management to the ER?

    Thanks

  • 0

    I am an ICU RN with just under 2 years experience. I am considering transferring from ICU to ER. I have my ACLS, PALS, and TNCC. As an ICU RN in my hospital, we respond to all incoming traumas, so I have experiencing with triage there. My IV skills are decent, but considering I work with mostly central lines in the ICU my concern would be that I could use some work there...

    I was just curious how you would think the transition would be? Any advice or helpful hints about the possible move?


    Thanks

  • 1
    BedsideBenevolence likes this.

    I've been accepted to Nursing@Simmons FNP program for the November 2016 cohort. The program sounds great, however the two things that concern me are the cost and the required live classes. My admission rep told me classes are offered from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. ET depending on the class, but I'm just concerned about fitting them in with my work schedule....

    I'm hoping to continue working full-time for the first year until clinicals begin and then I may consider cutting back to part-time at work. How are you all financing the tuition? From my research, the max amount your can borrow in federal direct loans is $20,500/year. That leaves a big gap in Simmons tuition....

  • 1
    Psych RN-BC likes this.

    I was wondering if anyone has attended SNHU's online MSN program? It sounds great and offers classes in advanced health assessment, patho, and pharmacology. I would like to complete a good general MSN now with the option to return to obtain my post-MSN certificate NP later.

    Any students of SNHU care to share your experience?

    Thanks

  • 0

    There is a case management position open at the hospital I work at. I have always been interested in case management, but I was wondering if any case mangers who are employed in a hospital setting can tell me about a typical day? For example, how many patients do you see? What do you assist with (discharge resources, setting up home health, durable medical equipment, etc....)?

    I have my BSN and two years of ICU experience.

    Thank you so much for your help!

  • 0

    Quote from Rparkzes
    Yes, it's a wonderful school and staff are caring and really want you to do well. I also didn't take Chemistry only A&P and Micro so bridge might or might not be an option. Keeping my fingers crossed. If you don't mind can you share your GPA and things u had that made them accept you. My fear is I don't have much experience but I love the fact they look at you as a whole.
    2 years of critical care experience and TNCC, ACLS, and PALS certifications
    4.0 GPA for my BSN

    It took a couple of days to receive my admission decision.

  • 1
    staceym likes this.

    I was recently accepted for the November 2016 cohort. I will be attending PT and plan on working FT as long as I can. I know I may have to go PT at work once clinicals start. One thing I really like about the program is the online format and that Simmons helps students with clinical placements, however I'm a little nervous about the cost of the program...

  • 1
    ICUman likes this.

    Are you comfortable and familiar with critical drips? Many times ICU transport pt's have multiple drips, so it would be helpful to understand titration and pharmacology of pressers, sedation, etc....

  • 0

    Quote from ndnursepract
    It will ABSOLUTELY be helpful. I too was a critical care nurse before starting NP school. Had never really spent any time in a clinic. Like someone above said, they are VASTLY different. You will still use your CCU knowledge some but the clinic experience will be invaluable.
    Good to know. I currently work in critical care and was accepted to a FNP program. I would like some clinic experience, but it will be better to keep my current job working 3 12's a week since clinical hours will likely be M-F.

  • 0

    Hi all! I was recently accepted to the Simmons College FNP online program. I have read some of the older threads from students who have attended the program, but I would love to hear from recent grads and current students about their experiences. Pros/cons/good/bad - would love to hear your thoughts!

    I plan on doing the part-time program while working full-time as long as I can...

    Thank you in advance!

    Chelle

  • 1
    CiaMia likes this.

    Thank you all for your wonderful responses. It sounds like my focus should be on finding the best NP program without regard to where it's located! Great information and advice

  • 0

    As a NP student, is it detrimental to attend school in a state that limits NP automony/prescriptive power? I know some states, such as Washington and Arizona, allow NP's to practice independently with complete autonomy and prescriptive powers.

    My goal would be to practice in a state with more progressive laws such as Washington and Arizona. However I am considering attending NP school in a state that limits the autonomy of NP's. Will this affect my long term practice? Would it be better to move to a more autonomous state to attend NP school or does it not matter as a NP student?

    Thank you in advance!

  • 0

    I was hoping to get the opinion of some of my fellow nurses on the job outlook in Atlanta, GA vs. Jacksonville, FL. I am considering moving within the next 4-6 months and was trying to determine where there would be better opportunities. I am family and friends in both areas.

    I am an RN with my BSN and will have just shy of 2 years of ICU experience when I move. I have my ACLS, PALS, TNCC, and NIH Stroke Scale certification.

    Which metro area would offer greater opportunities?

    Thank you in advance

  • 0

    Quote from ED Nurse, BSN RN
    I don't know the salary in Atlanta, but you can do a google search and come up with a range; however, don't expect too much more than a new nurse out of school, bc two years in the grand scheme of things is still, relatively, a new nurse- and hospitals see it that way too.
    I'm surprised to hear that. I would think a nurse with 2 years of experience, a proven track record, and who has all required certifications would definitely earn more than a new grad. Instead of having to invest time, resources, and training in the hopes the new nurse is successful, a potential employer would have a nurse that could hit the ground running.


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