Latest Comments by DesertSky

Latest Comments by DesertSky

DesertSky, BSN, RN 1,810 Views

Joined Feb 21, '12. DesertSky is a Critical Care RN. Posts: 42 (38% Liked) Likes: 21

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    Just shy of 2 years...

  • 0

    You do have to make healthy choices and make a conscious effort to make your health a priority. I have been on nights for about 2 years and have never adjusted. Thankfully I am going to days in a few weeks, but here are some tips I have learned:

    1) Meal prep your food for the nights you work. I almost always work 3 nights in a row, so the night before I prepare all my food for the work week. This way I don't have to think about what to eat, I can sleep in longer, and I save money! I bring things like almonds, greek yogurt, apples, chicken and vegetables, soups, etc...

    2) Make exercise a priority. I always work out on my days off and try to do at least 30 minutes of exercise on nights I work. I do a workout video at home or go for a walk.

    3) Don't fall victim to sweets/treats at work. At my job, someone is almost always bringing in cakes, sweets, or family members bring food to thank us for taking care of family members. If you indulge overtime there are treats at work, you will gain weight in no time! Instead follow the 80/20 rule - eat healthy 80% of the time and cut yourself some slack the other 20% and allow for indulgences in moderation.

    Some people naturally adjust to nights better than others. Unfortunately despite my healthy eating and exercise routine, I never felt good on nights. I gained about 8 pounds (from 5'8 and 122 pounds to about 130 pounds) while on nightshift, but I was also diagnosed with hypothyroidism at that time so it's hard to determine if nights was the only cause. I am on thyroid medication now and am back down to 125 pounds.

    Sometimes I find it's easy to overeat if you are stressed or anxious, but I remind myself how crappy I feel after an overindulgence! My energy levels are much better when I am eating healthy. Good luck

  • 1
    tnbutterfly likes this.

    As someone who started as a new grad with a BSN in Kansas, it is true the pay is very low. After securing a job in another state before learning my husband's job was relocating him to Kansas, it was like a punch in the stomach when I compared new grad pay in Kansas to my other job offer.

    The one thing I will mention is that due to the low pay, cold winters, and general lack of people flocking to move to Kansas, there are plenty of opportunities for new grads especially in speciality areas. It may be harder to land a job as a new grad in larger cities such as Kansas City or Wichita, but if you are willing to move to more rural areas of Kansas there are an abundance of opportunities. If you work for 2 years and take advantage of your employer paying for all of your certifications (TNCC, ACLS, PALS, etc...) you will be very marketable and will have an abundance of job offers wherever you would like to move...

  • 2

    Quote from calivianya
    Very important question here. Not all states have income tax, but I'm not familiar enough off the top of my head to know if any of the bottom states are free of income tax. If those are before tax numbers, those could be very skewed if a nurse is trying to figure out in what states the actual compensation is the worst.
    Kansas is one of the lowest paying across numerous lists and has a relatively high rate of state income tax.

  • 2

    I can tell you the low pay represented for Kansas is before taxes. Shockingly enough, Kansas also has some of the highest tax rates in the country.

  • 0

    Quote from soyoureanurse
    Hello! I am planning to go back to school to get my nurse practitioner. However, I am having a hard time deciding which track to choose. Some background--I've been an RN for a short period of time (8 months) and do not currently work in critical care. I work in Med Surg. However, when we have a rapid response I am one of the first people in that room and I'm right at the head of the bed with respiratory where all the action's happening getting O2 set up, bagging, giving boluses, etc. I love it. I love the adrenaline rush. That's the kind of stuff I want to do. Recently I accepted a position on a step-down ICU floor and I'm like a little kid on Christmas morning--I'm so pumped. These patients will be higher acuity and so I'm hoping that will help me determine if I truly want to do acute care NP. Now, my question(s)--I've read on other forums people suggest going for FNP as it has more options on where to work, is that true? What places could I work as an FNP? I, personally, am not interested in working in a doctor's office or clinic. Now as an acute care NP I could join the hospitalist team, but do I need to have the acute care NP track for that? I read some people were recommending the FNP program so that when you decide to slow down you don't have to stay in the hospital. Can FNP's join the hospitalist team? Can acute care NP's work in other areas? Thank you for your advice, sorry, that's a lot of questions!
    Sounds like your interest is geared more towards ACNP. Just a heads up - most programs I have seen require at least one year of ICU experience for acceptance to the ACNP track.

  • 1
    Farawyn likes this.

    OlivetheRN and kidsmom002:

    Thanks for the replies. It sounds like my best bet is clarifying my employer's policy on the matter and going from there. Thanks for the heads up

  • 0

    Quote from springchick1
    We've had people do it. At my hospital, you clock in under a different department department code for each job so it isn't overtime.
    Really? Oh that would be great. Perhaps I could ask HR and see if that would be possible.

  • 0

    Quote from klone
    Probably not, because it would mean you'd go into overtime for one or the other.
    Ah yes, I didn't even think about that. So it sounds like if I want a PRN position with guaranteed shifts, I need to look at another hospital?

  • 1
    RunnerKate likes this.

    I have a question. I work FT in the ICU, however there is a PRN PACU position that opened up at my current employer. The PRN job requires 4 shifts per month and pays double what my hourly rate is in the ICU since it is PRN. I am interested in picking up the PRN position in addition to my FT ICU job. Do you think my hospital would be ok with me working both?

    Please let me know if you have had a similar situation arise and how it worked out.

    Thanks in advance!

    DesertSky

  • 0

    Thank you to everyone for their great replies and words of wisdom. I really appreciate your help. I definitely have some things to consider before making the move

  • 0

    Quote from Bobjohnny
    Not being phenomenal at starting IVs doesn't matter, you'll get plenty of practice. If you're really concerned about, depending on facility policy, see if you can IV ultrasound trained and/or IO trained. When somebody comes in from the field and its a basic crew, nothing beats an IO for insertion speed.

    Typically ICU & ICU stepdown nurses can make the clinical transition pretty well. They usually have the critical care knowledge and don't need to be taught a lot of stuff (vents, art lines, etc.). I have seen a couple struggle with remembering every patient isn't swirling the toilet when they first transfer. This typically gets rectified fairly quickly.

    I've also seen somebody struggle with the organized chaos and lack of routine in ED. Since ICU already responds to all of the traumas you probably have some idea of this. But, I just mention it because I have seen people struggle with the lack of having a routine.
    Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply. Glad to hear my so-so IV skills will get lots of practice in the ER. No better way to learn than practice and watching expert ER nurses in action.

    I did consider the chaos the ER and know that it will be a change from the ICU. Of course I am used to being busy with critical patients circling the drain and coding, but I know the ER is a different kind of busy with multiple new admits and the unknown of not knowing what will roll through the door next. Any advice for how to flip my time management to the ER?

    Thanks

  • 0

    I am an ICU RN with just under 2 years experience. I am considering transferring from ICU to ER. I have my ACLS, PALS, and TNCC. As an ICU RN in my hospital, we respond to all incoming traumas, so I have experiencing with triage there. My IV skills are decent, but considering I work with mostly central lines in the ICU my concern would be that I could use some work there...

    I was just curious how you would think the transition would be? Any advice or helpful hints about the possible move?


    Thanks

  • 1
    BedsideBenevolence likes this.

    I've been accepted to Nursing@Simmons FNP program for the November 2016 cohort. The program sounds great, however the two things that concern me are the cost and the required live classes. My admission rep told me classes are offered from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. ET depending on the class, but I'm just concerned about fitting them in with my work schedule....

    I'm hoping to continue working full-time for the first year until clinicals begin and then I may consider cutting back to part-time at work. How are you all financing the tuition? From my research, the max amount your can borrow in federal direct loans is $20,500/year. That leaves a big gap in Simmons tuition....

  • 1
    Psych RN-BC likes this.

    I was wondering if anyone has attended SNHU's online MSN program? It sounds great and offers classes in advanced health assessment, patho, and pharmacology. I would like to complete a good general MSN now with the option to return to obtain my post-MSN certificate NP later.

    Any students of SNHU care to share your experience?

    Thanks


close
close