Latest Likes For sarolaRN

sarolaRN, ASN, RN 4,799 Views

Joined Jan 24, '12 - from 'New York, NY, US'. Posts: 271 (42% Liked) Likes: 351

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  • Oct 18

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Oct 15

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Oct 11

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Oct 6

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 24

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 23

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 23

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 23

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 22

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 22

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 22

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Aug 31

    I'm a new grad from an ADN program in the Northeast- where all the hospitals are magnet and BSN is standard. ADN is akin to a diploma program (which are nearly extinct, I think). It's harder to find work up here and finding a position in a hospital will pretty much only happen if you're already working there or know someone very well who can hook you up. In the Southeast, it's a bit different. I considered relocating to FL to find work and was actually offered 4 interviews when I only applied to 6 jobs. Up here I applied to about 160 jobs and had 2 interviews.
    You're in a program already. Finish your program and jump into an RN to BSN after. You will likely find work in a hospital and maybe even on a specialized unit where you are. Many hospitals ask that you obtain your BSN within x years of hire, and if it's 5 years, then you work for a year and see if your hospital offers tuition assistance.
    Stay in your program, do well, and go about your career path. An ADN will not hinder your opportunity to later become an NP. Don't let the BSN folk turn their nose up at you, they just take a few more liberal arts classes and nursing theory classes. If it were that different, we wouldn't be sitting for the same NCLEX. Also, you might not be able to transfer your nursing credits if you decide to leave your program so just stick it out and do a bridge later.

  • Aug 31

    I'm a new grad from an ADN program in the Northeast- where all the hospitals are magnet and BSN is standard. ADN is akin to a diploma program (which are nearly extinct, I think). It's harder to find work up here and finding a position in a hospital will pretty much only happen if you're already working there or know someone very well who can hook you up. In the Southeast, it's a bit different. I considered relocating to FL to find work and was actually offered 4 interviews when I only applied to 6 jobs. Up here I applied to about 160 jobs and had 2 interviews.
    You're in a program already. Finish your program and jump into an RN to BSN after. You will likely find work in a hospital and maybe even on a specialized unit where you are. Many hospitals ask that you obtain your BSN within x years of hire, and if it's 5 years, then you work for a year and see if your hospital offers tuition assistance.
    Stay in your program, do well, and go about your career path. An ADN will not hinder your opportunity to later become an NP. Don't let the BSN folk turn their nose up at you, they just take a few more liberal arts classes and nursing theory classes. If it were that different, we wouldn't be sitting for the same NCLEX. Also, you might not be able to transfer your nursing credits if you decide to leave your program so just stick it out and do a bridge later.

  • Aug 28

    Didn't realize that you're working in tech any not nursing. Expand your horizons and apply elsewhere. If nursing is what you want and you're determined to work at this facility then you need to commit to your practice and earn your position there, which starts with gaining experience that your dream hospital will want to see on your resume. Good luck.

  • Aug 28

    It sounds like your current situation is a bit unsustainable, so in the mean time maybe take your current situation and make it something that you can learn from and live with. You can still continue to apply for positions with your dream employer, but don't let it detract from the valuable experience that you've been gaining and will continue to gain. Use it to beef up your resume and cover letters, and keep applying, and maybe consider expanding your horizons into positions and facilities that can lead you to where you want to end up. Show up and network with HR if you have to. Do you know anyone on the unit that you aspire to be on? Are there hiring events? Eventually, something will give. Over the past 5 years I applied for over 100 positions with my dream employer, about 60 of which were in the past few months since I got my RN license (not to mention the other 150 positions I applied for elsewhere) and finally snagged a job at a facility with my dream employer. It's doable, but you have to make good use of the time in between.


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