Content That jt43 Likes

Content That jt43 Likes

jt43 3,266 Views

Joined Jan 9, '12 - from 'Suffolk, VA, US'. Posts: 158 (27% Liked) Likes: 162

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  • Nov 10 '12

    I'm not trying to kick a hornets nest, just an observation.

    When someone does something beyond our comprehension, we (I'm guilty too) call them "mentally ill."

    I believe there are just some really thoroughbred evil people in this world, and they can fit into society to a huge interwoven extent. They can be scout leaders, NURSES, priests, and even Elementary School Teachers.

    To me, anyone who can do that and commit atrocious acts against elders and children, or even mental defectives, and then host a scout meet that evening- ARE Evil in a real pure form.

    There are Wolves in Sheep's clothing-and they prey on the weak and defenseless.

  • Nov 1 '12

    When I asked a pt if she wanted anything to drink, she replied,

    " I DON"T WANT NONE OF YOUR KOOL-AID, JIM JONES..."

  • Nov 1 '12

    Quote from bubblejet50
    Ok I will give you the advice that changed my whole iv experience. I got this during my er rotation from an er nurse of 20years. My school was all about "you have to see the vein and go at a 45 degree angle." I missed everytime. The er nurse told me to feel for the vein, hold one finger above the site you want to use one below to hold the vein still (not too hard tho), and position the needle like you are landing a plane with very little angle. (i wish I could show you!) Never missed an iv on first try since. Had prob on only one blood draw but it was a very dehydrated elderly lady and I still got half a tube when no one else could. I hope it makes sense to you
    I never thought or was told to hold the vein in place that I wanted to stick. They want us to feel the vein and not just go by what we see. I know this is going to sound harsh but I think another problem I have is I am too gentle when going to insert the needle. One instructor told me that you have to kind of be force full when attempting to stick the vein because if you don't the vein will move to the other side. I know I have to learn this skill but I just have a hard time being that force full or moving the needle that quick in someone's skin because I know it hurts them. Thanks for the tip and thanks everyone else for the help.

  • Nov 1 '12

    Ok I will give you the advice that changed my whole iv experience. I got this during my er rotation from an er nurse of 20years. My school was all about "you have to see the vein and go at a 45 degree angle." I missed everytime. The er nurse told me to feel for the vein, hold one finger above the site you want to use one below to hold the vein still (not too hard tho), and position the needle like you are landing a plane with very little angle. (i wish I could show you!) Never missed an iv on first try since. Had prob on only one blood draw but it was a very dehydrated elderly lady and I still got half a tube when no one else could. I hope it makes sense to you

  • Oct 31 '12

    Quote from jt43
    I'm a student and was wondering if it's normal to hear a split S2 sound on newborns? Sometimes when I'm auscultating and counting, it seems to me like there is an occasional 3rd sound. I asked a floor nurse about it and she thought that possibly I was getting confused hearing the couplets (lub-dub) because the heart rate was so fast. My perception was that there was definitely a third sound.
    Good ear a split S2 is normal in the newborn due to the galloping cadence (rhythm) of their heart. It is the absence of it that is concern.
    Newborn Cardiopulmonary Exam

  • Oct 31 '12

    My pediatrician told me the trick is to count by fours, tapping a finger on each group as if you were tapping your toes to music as you listen ... "ONE (two three four), TWO (two three four), THREE (two three four), FOUR (two three four), FIVE (two three four), SIX (two three four), SEVEN (two three four)..." then multiply by four (For example, that was 28 beats.) Even if it's very fast you can keep track that way.

  • Oct 28 '12

    Eh, I'd say Micro and A&P. Math is important but it's not any particularly high level of math. I learned to do ratios in high school. Chemistry could e useful but they should teach you what you need to know (which isn't much.) You'll be expected to have an A&P knowledge base and you won't be retaught most of it.
    I took my last A&P, math, and chem classes 7 years ago and with the rusty knowledge base A&P is causing me the most annoyance. I'm a little slower on the draw than my classmates with some of that stuff.

  • Oct 22 '12

    Quote from almostmadeit
    My mom is 50, I don't think she can really handle a med surg job. I just think she needs a slower paced job in a not too busy part of the hospital.
    Why don't you let your mother worry about what sort of a job she can handle. I'm older than your mom, and I'd be pretty insulted if you were writing this sort of thing about ME.

  • Oct 18 '12

    Not to defend the RN who struck your son, but I would like to relay my expearences. I am a nurse and an EMT. I have answered over 600 emergency calls. Both times I have been involved in accidents, I have not been able to perfectly relay my location. Accidents are very disorientating, and even Uninjured parties can be in shock. I was in the ambulance when a vehicle crossed the double yellow and struck us. I have very little memory of what happened after the accident. I know I was wondering around the scene, Uninjured but confused. I didn't even have a head Injury, I was simpily in shock. I have listened to the tapes of me on the radio giving incorrect location and requesting a single bls ambulance. Thank God for the fire captan who was following us to the call, she was relaying correct information and asked for the four ambulances that were required. I know you blame the nurse for not acting, but I urge you to consider that even trained individuals may not proform to the level you expect, and leagally mandating nurses to proform skills they are not trained in, or due to circumstances cannot proform may cause more harm then good. I'm deeply sorry for your loss, and I cannot tell you what to do with your feelings against this woman. I can only relay my expearence and hope it gives some perspective.

  • Oct 17 '12

    Quote from psu_213
    however, I was stunned by the level of ignorance by these nurses. There are reasons to not get the shot, but saying "the shot makes me sick" is not one of them.
    I'm stunned by the ignorance of people that don't realize that some people do have pretty severe flu-like symptoms after vaccination.

  • Oct 9 '12

    We are required to do our own morning lab draws (regardless if the patient has a PICC) on my unit. I call down to the lab and phlebotomists all the time with questions because I know they are the experts in that field of medicine and I am grateful for their help. Teamwork people, teamwork.

  • Oct 9 '12

    I don't know squat about that sort of thing, so I would never presume to tell the phlebotomist how to do his/her job. Were I the phlebotomist, I'd tell the nurse to step off and stick to his or her job and leave me to mine.

  • Oct 6 '12

    Sounds like you need a second opinion. The OB says RIGHT NOW for a hysterectomy? Or what? You'll catch fire? Get a second opinion, please!

  • Sep 27 '12

    Can I just be frank? You are not the failure, your instructor is. I am a nursing instructor, and would never in a million years treat a student in this way. It would be one thing if you were a student who was well advanced in the program and still didn't understand where to place the foley bag. However, this was your first day. I can't understand how this is teaching you anything. Yes, you should have been corrected, in a private manner, with compassion.

    The only time I would ever become this angry is if a student isn't trying (ex- reading a book instead of working, etc). You were trying. Everyone has bad days, and if this experience had been treated properly (as a learning experience) it still could have taught you what not to do without completely undermining your confidence. It is possible to have extremely tough standards without resorting to humiliation and unkindness to enforce them.

    You are on track as much as one would expect at this point. I would ask experienced staff about developing a routine, and as you mentioned, begin to find a plan that works for you in organizing your day. It will get easier. That said, even the best laid plans go awry, and we all have horrible, terrible days from time to time. Brush yourself off, and realize that the problem is primarily the manner in which your instructor handled things. I will say one thing: the best thing I see coming from this so far is that you easily admit mistakes. There is nothing more dangerous than a nurse who either does not admit or does not realize more mistakes (in other words, a "know it all"). Clearly you are not this type of student. This is a good thing.

  • Sep 26 '12

    I don't mean this in any rude way at all, but is it possible you have mild Asperger's? That would make it very difficult for you to relate to others, and people often misjudge people with Asperger's because they tend to be a bit no-nonsense and straightforward. I find chit chat very difficult, and I have to work at small talk. I agree with a lot that has been said here. You don't have to come in like the old Steve Martin Wild and Crazy Guy, but make an effort to compliment a new hairstyle, ask about someone's kid, compliment a nursing skill. Work is supposed to be about work, and I don't advocate a shift-long gab fest at the expense of patient care, but it makes people uncomfortable sometimes to be around a coworker who is absolutely all work and no play. I have worked with nurses who keep to themselves or who don't participate in social talk, and rather than just assuming they are shy or private, people automatically jump to "stuck up" or "snobby" or "rude."
    As for the bluntness, I, too, can be very blunt, and I have to watch it. While I might not mean to imply that someone is stupid, apparently I can give off that vibe. I expect a lot out of myself, and I also expect a lot out of other nurses, too. Before making a statement that might be construed as rude or condescending, think of a way to rephrase it in a non-threatening way. "You did that wrong." sounds so much worse than "Hmm, I never thought of doing it that way, I always thought that you did it this way because then (fill in the rationale)." Precepting nursing students beat a lot of the blunt out of me. I would think I was giving needed information, and they thought I was being mean and critical. Sometimes it is all in the presentation!


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