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Sensibility, BSN, RN 2,484 Views

Joined Sep 9, '11 - from 'South, Florida'. Sensibility is a Staff RN. Posts: 99 (36% Liked) Likes: 62

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  • Mar 13

    I concur. We think following the old ways of treating our fellow nurses is acceptable. We don't see these things from the perspective of these younger nurses. Hospitals are tired of recruiting newbies only to have them leave because they feel that people are unwilling to help them when they're new. Seniors put them through a rigorous initiation that few people can endure. When you do things over and over, they become second nature and routine. It is much easier to work when you know so much. A new nurse has to constantly think through every step. You would think that this senior nurse's superiority is appreciated. It's not. What's appreciated is people who help and work as a team and recognize that all that they know is probably the result of those who were their seniors once upon a time, investing in them. I doubt this nurse has a clue because "we've always done it that way." No more. It is a huge expense to train someone only to have them leave. If you are the type who is unwilling to change, you might want to consider quitting while you're ahead. I am also 60 yo.

  • Dec 29 '16

    Some people, Ruby, are not as good at others at blowing people's reactions off. They don't teach that in school and when we do act that way, we become the very people we dislike so much. It hard to stay above it. My husband, God bless him, has listened to me on more than a few occasions share some of my frustrations. He prays for me. I don't know what I would do without a husband that prays for me night after night. God has woken him up on some of my worst nights to pray. That is the truth. The thing that works for me is forgiving my offenders and giving it to God to handle. And trust me, He has handled things for me in ways that I could not have. It doesn't help me though when there is so much pressure, anger, abusive talking from patients and the overwhelming responsibility. One thing I am grateful for is that my hospital has zero tolerance for negative behaviors. If an employee wants to get in trouble, just start giving people a hard time of it and that includes the physicians. Nevertheless, when one situations is resolved, another seems to arise. The better we are at patient care and knowing what we are doing, the better we are in other areas. In other words, experience helps. I am a nice person. I don't like nursing either when people aren't nice. I don't like to be yelled at or for people to take their frustrations out on me. These are things that people should know when they sign up for nursing. It is not easy to live day to day in the pressure cooker.

  • Dec 19 '16

    The saddest part of these stories is that we can offer love and support to the children but we are not the "ones" who the child wants to be giving it. At the end of the day, strangers do not satisfy that need for a real mom or dad. I have witnessed that in life. I have seen some children receive so much love and concern and grow into bitter teenagers only to throw it back in the face of those offering it because it isn't mom. The question keeps churning around in their brain, "Why did my mom leave me? Why didn't she love me more than ______?" My own children are stable because they did receive love from me and continue to receive it.

    People today are self centered and selfish. Being a parent means laying down your life. It requires loss of sleep, sacrifices where you deny your own creature comforts for theirs, patience galore, and an understanding heart. God's grace gave me the strength and ability. How many parents today look to Jesus, prayer or grace? Me thinks not very many. This very comment is going to offend a whole lot of people. I rest my case.

  • Dec 13 '16

    All you need to do in those cases is chart that the O2 saturation etc was reported to the nurse and physician (with their names). No orders received. You can't go over their heads. As it turned out, you were correct. But you might have been incorrect. Calling 9-1-1 is their responsibility. Meds typically have an hour window. Hope that helps.

  • Dec 12 '16

    I am going to take a bit of a different approach because Emergent, RN said later that they did what everyone is pretty much agreeing is the right course of action and I am assuming that something happened.

    This is is a drug abuser with poor coping skills. These types of individuals are prone to lying. That is one classic of their "poor coping." What are we talking about though? Pot? Cocaine? PCP? Meth? Crack? So we're first of all assuming the patient did in fact run out of Lasix. Is that true? What goes through the mind of a drug addict can be totally out of touch with reality. I am not an ER nurse but I would like to know if and what he/she's using and a BMP result to ensure he/she's telling the truth.

  • Aug 20 '16

    I was thinking later about cocaine and the effects on the lungs and circulation especially if there is already an underlying condition. I am not that knowledgable on this topic but I am wondering what the effect would be if the patient had something involving drug abuse going on and was lying about home Lasix med because they wanted a quick fix to the side effects of what they were doing. I think a complete metabolic panel would be better than just a basic metabolic panel to see if something is happening in the liver. A lot of those drugs are laced with fillers that can harm again especially if there is an underlying condition. Then add a whopping dose of Lasix and what would that be? Could that throw such an individual in a state of ODing because the fluids in the body are needed to process the drugs? With cocaine too, I have a family member that used to be an addict. When these folks are on a high, it is not like, for example, being drunk. They seem like they are normal as rain when they're not. They have those same characteristics of any drug abuser though such as irresponsibility and lying. Pot causes the bloodshot eyes. I am totally ignorant on other types of drug abuse and what it looks like. Pot is something one would have to smoke and again, some of it has fillers. Could this effect the lungs in an already compromised patient? Another thought I had was whether the pitting edema was due to malnutrition versus the CHF? Cocaine addicts will go a long time without eating.

  • Aug 20 '16

    I am going to take a bit of a different approach because Emergent, RN said later that they did what everyone is pretty much agreeing is the right course of action and I am assuming that something happened.

    This is is a drug abuser with poor coping skills. These types of individuals are prone to lying. That is one classic of their "poor coping." What are we talking about though? Pot? Cocaine? PCP? Meth? Crack? So we're first of all assuming the patient did in fact run out of Lasix. Is that true? What goes through the mind of a drug addict can be totally out of touch with reality. I am not an ER nurse but I would like to know if and what he/she's using and a BMP result to ensure he/she's telling the truth.

  • Aug 15 '16

    What is really sad is that these young nurses are exalted in the eyes of the leadership. The leadership goes so overboard to try and get these people to stay. I am not asking for people to be treated disrespectfully. I am asking for those same people to notice what's going on and do something about it. Oh, and did I mention that these girls get nurse of the year for doing absolutely nothing over and above the call of duty? People such as myself who are no longer cute or young but do many extras get not even a thank you note. LOL. The system is definitely flawed. All those kudos do not change the fact that many of the young people that get into nursing are not inclined to bedside nursing. They are prima donnas who thought that taking care of poop and vomit would be glamorous and lucrative. It is hard to have to make up the difference to give the best nursing care in that environment. You would not believe the standard that I am held to.

  • Aug 15 '16

    Quote from Mom To 4
    Keep work at work and your life outside of that.
    That is true. But that isn't the point. Most lateral violence that is typically cited is concerning senior nurses to the newer nurses. That has happened to me even though I was older age wise at the time. I think the frustration for me personally is embracing bedside nursing. If everyone is aspiring to get away from it and only a few senior nurses are at bedside for 30 plus years, then the other spots are constantly being filled and rotated by new nurses who can't wait to leave. So they leave and another person who is new comes to take their place. The senior nurses give a great deal of themselves into those nurses to make them successful but rarely get any recognition for their efforts. I actually like teaching. In fact, as a night shift nurse, I have come to expect the outcome that the person is aspiring to eventually move on. I pour myself into these people knowing they will leave at some point. My only contention is that some of them (not all) are not there to work or are not there because they care. I could care less what they do in their off time. I barely have time for my own family. I have no desire to do anything with anyone outside of work. I love this statement from the original post. " as if those great women who pioneered nursing to care for the sick, indigent and wounded would be so saddened by the "General Hospital", "Grays Anatomy"; "high school acting" nurses of today."

  • Aug 15 '16

    What is really sad is that these young nurses are exalted in the eyes of the leadership. The leadership goes so overboard to try and get these people to stay. I am not asking for people to be treated disrespectfully. I am asking for those same people to notice what's going on and do something about it. Oh, and did I mention that these girls get nurse of the year for doing absolutely nothing over and above the call of duty? People such as myself who are no longer cute or young but do many extras get not even a thank you note. LOL. The system is definitely flawed. All those kudos do not change the fact that many of the young people that get into nursing are not inclined to bedside nursing. They are prima donnas who thought that taking care of poop and vomit would be glamorous and lucrative. It is hard to have to make up the difference to give the best nursing care in that environment. You would not believe the standard that I am held to.

  • Aug 15 '16

    Excellent post. I could not have said it better. What the writer identified is so common place that it is scary. I have only met a handful of young nurses who come to night shift for their first position in nursing that really embrace the whole concept of what it is to be a nurse. They immediately enroll in a college for their MSN degree. We had several openings for day shift. I was not asked by upper management if I wanted this. But these nurses who have been there for a year or two were. I do believe they gossip and bad mouth the very people that invested their lives into them to make them successful. I won't say all but many of them do. They want to get out of bedside nursing as quickly as they possibly can. Most of the ones I have met are not as ruthless as the one mentioned above. The scenario of doing something personal while others work is also commonplace. It is one thing if there is some downtime for everyone. No problem. It is another thing if they could so easily take some of the burden off of others but instead without conscience sit there while others are working their b-hinds off.

  • Aug 13 '16

    So true. Workplace bullying amongst nurses has become a real art. I almost prefer the in your face approach vs. the passive aggression. Hospitals invest so much money into every employee and so they are reticent to fire these people. Wish you the best. There are no easy answers to your question.



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