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mercurysmom, RN 5,900 Views

Joined Jul 25, '11 - from 'New England'. mercurysmom is a Disabilities Advocate; Consultant. She has '27' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Early Intervention, Nsg. Education'. Posts: 159 (71% Liked) Likes: 536

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  • Feb 16

    Quote from Amethya
    I think the same way, but stupid grandmother was like "Insurance this, insurance that." And would keep calling some random person and talking bad about me in front of me and I'm like, really? What I say, goes. So I'm thinking that I'm going to say this to the next safety committee meeting that I don't care what family says, if the child is having an emergency, I will call 911 then call parents.
    If they want to go down the $ road, a funeral costs WAY more than an ER deductible.

  • Feb 16

    Heck, if I have a diagnosed asthma student with respiratory distress to the point where they cannot speak AND has had no response from their inhaler AND neb? AND mom is 30+ minutes away? Oh, I'm calling 911. Actually I would be calling 911 first, then I'm calling Mom to tell her to meet the ambulance at the hospital instead.

  • Feb 16

    If a child is not yet diagnosed with asthma or I have no Drs orders/inhaler, I'm calling 911 right away and then calling the parents. I'd much rather deal with an upset parent who wasn't called first than any of the other circumstances that could come from waiting too long to call. For a child that can't speak full sentences without being out of breath (which is what it sounds like from your story) they need help ASAP, and no matter where Mom or Dad is I'm sure an ambulance can get there sooner. I will not apologize for ensuring one of my students is breathing.

  • Feb 16

    Four minutes, that's what you have once a person goes into respiratory arrest. Ventilations and intubation are marginally effective for asthmatics in full bronchospasm, they can die in the ER. That being said, parents are going to be far more forgiving of a death in the ER than an unavoidable death outside the hospital. Inability to talk is 911 immediately.

  • Feb 16

    One of the best things about working in a small school is that I get to know these students pretty well. I also have a ton of frequent flyers. So one of my usual ones came in this morning with the same old complaint of her belly hurting. Took her temp, gave water, set up the heating pad. Asked the typical questions, what did you eat for breakfast, when did you last poop, etc. But I could tell this was more nerves. So I asked her what was going on today in class and how it is Valentine's Day which means you can't get sick because of all the fun that will happen in class. She broke down and said that she left her Valentine cards in her dad's car and the secretary wouldn't let her call home. I get that, the secretary doesn't want to have the students use the phone if they forgot something. She's tough. But my mommy heart broke so I whipped out construction paper that I have in my office and we decorated 16 little cut up pieces of paper with stickers and she signed her name in less than 10 minutes. The teacher was so thankful because apparently she was so upset that she couldn't focus in class. Glad that I was able to make her day a little better.

  • Jan 17

    A face mask and vicks vapor rub under your nose...it works wonders. If the patient asks why you have a mask say you have a bit of a runny nose.

  • Jan 17

    I would speak to an admissions advisor at BCC to find out what your evening class schedule would be and then talk to your manager to see if there is a workable solution. Do NOT sink $20K + into a for-profit LPN program with a low pass rate. Do you really want to go in to debt (since your job won't pay for it) for something that you might not even be able to pass NCLEX? Not worth the risk.

    Get a quality education. Sounds like BCC is quality with a 100% pass rate. There's usually a way to work around things. I would definitely arm yourself with all the info you need and then schedule a meeting with your manager.

    Good luck

  • Jan 15

    On more than one occasion in elementary school they told my mother that the reason they did not advance me to the next grade ahead of my peers was because I would reach a point around adolescence where I would pay the price for being out of touch with the others, so I was out of touch anyway. Believe me, sitting around bored in class does not make for a challenging or pleasant time at school. I finagled my own catch up plan by engineering my early high school graduation. I still was not socially up to par and still paid the price in college. No matter what the situation was, I have always felt that no one ever took a good look at my emotional needs nor did they effect changes that were beneficial to me. Think long and hard about what is truly in the best interests of your daughter and don't go pushing like a freight train just because it seems like the thing to do. Problems in childhood and adolescence have a funny way of lingering on into adulthood. Just saying, from experience.

  • Jan 13
  • Jan 13

    Nurses eat their young because young nurses continue to post items about nurses eating their young. You see, it drives us to it.

  • Jan 13

    No specialty is immune. All nurses eventually develop a taste for young flesh. The toxic environment results from the subsequent passing of gas as those old nurses digest their young meals.

  • Jan 12

    I think some of the newer nurses are astounded (or don't really believe) that most of us who came down the pike more than a few years ago had clinical instructors that took full responsibility for teaching their students.

    I was NEVER supposed to rely on the staff nurse to teach me. I had to report things I'd done or let her know about changes in her patient's status. I know she went over the MARs behind me (her responsibility to her patient didn't go away just because I was there) to make sure everything got done. Occasionally she'd offer me pearls of wisdom if we happened to cross paths. But she was NOT responsible for teaching me. Why would she be? That would be incredibly crass of my university to try to use staff nurses as FREE labor, all the while charging ME tuition for...INSTRUCTION.

    My CIs were on site every minute. They were there to teach us nursing. They NEVER threw us onto the floor nurses and disappeared. It's only recently I guess that schools are pulling this on hospitals. How great is it for them that they can take on too many students, charge them out the wazoo for tuition, inflict the students on the staff nurses, then try to make the nurses feel GUILTY for not wanting to provide free services for them, all the while giving the students the impression that that staff nurses (who have absolutely zero affiliation with the school) have some kind of noble obligation to take on students with no compensation or reduction of patient load? You know, because those nurses were students once, too. Not only that, the student nurses go into the situation believing that they are somehow lessening the work load of the staff nurse, not adding to it. And apparently they graduate still believing that!

    It boggles the mind that this is apparently becoming SOP now.

  • Jan 12

    Quote from roser13
    And please - again: the floor nurse is not your instructor. Teaching nursing students is not remotely his/her responsibility. I cannot emphasize that strongly enough. You have an instructor who should be on the floor, assisting/tutoring the students. Don't say it can't be done: My CI did it with one hand tied behind her back.
    ^^ This, a hundred times.

    In none of my clinical experiences or, later, as a clinical instructor, were the staff nurses ever expected to take any responsibility or put any time or effort into teaching the nursing students. This phenomenon of dumping nursing students on the staff and expecting them to do the clinical instructor's job is fairly recent and, guess what? Lots of staff nurses don't like it.

  • Jan 12

    At the end of the day . . .

  • Jan 12

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