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mercurysmom, RN 5,878 Views

Joined Jul 25, '11 - from 'New England'. mercurysmom is a Disabilities Advocate; Consultant. She has '27' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Early Intervention, Nsg. Education'. Posts: 159 (71% Liked) Likes: 536

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  • Mar 22

    In my experience, it's been poorly crushed meds that gum up the tube rather than formula. All the meds given thru a 60ml syringe, then water to clear the syringe but not enough to clear the tube as well. I've been a J-tuber myself for 6 years. Clogged tubes at home? Once. Clogged tubes inpatient? Can't count!
    mm

  • Feb 13

    I'm self-employed, and while my disabilities provide me with a unique perspective in many ways, I generally don't advertise the fact that I'm disabled when I'm setting up a workshop or other services with a new client.

    Since I'm hired as a private contractor, I often need to bid on jobs. I'm Deaf and fluent in ASL. Interpreters are expensive! If I disclose any accommodation requirements during the bidding process, there's no way I'll get the job. Instead, I've hired 2 individuals and paid for them to learn C-Print captioning. I bought the software and hardware myself, and pay my captionists privately. Right before the workshop, I confirm that the space is wheelchair accessible and that I can access the site's Wifi in order to use the C-Print program in addition to whatever AV needs I have for my presentation.

    I hate to say it, but unfortunately it's true: in certain situations, there's definitely an advantage to having a disability, especially if it's a "visible" disability with cheap or no-cost accommodations. So, if I go into a conference as a guest speaker with a wheelchair, service dog, and provide my own accommodations for my deafness? Home run! Check all those boxes without changing the bottom line! However, I still do run into biases from time to time, which is why I am very careful not to disclose any more personal info than absolutely necessary, and I make sure that my C.V. reads "Advocate" more than "person with disabilities."

    Most of my work comes via word-of-mouth, repeat clients, and existing contracts via my state Voc Rehab and local colleges (I teach at a local CC.) I'm pretty sure that there have been a few jobs that I've been hired for specifically because of my disabilities, which can get a bit uncomfortable if I let the discussion drift too close to the "So, what's wrong with you?" boundary line. I do answer questions in a very general way, and I am comfortable discussing my DME needs if it's relevant to the topic I've been hired to discuss.

    The only question I absolutely will NOT answer is "If you're disabled, why are you working?" [emoji19] :::sigh:::

  • Jan 22

    Years ago I had a sweet LOL in LTC who had IBS-D. Every morning around 0600 she rang to ask for her "linoleum" (Imodium.)

  • Jan 14

    Quote from Asystole RN
    I know a nurse who was licensed at 18, as in she graduated BEFORE she turned 18.
    This was me. I entered a hospital-based LPN program at 16 and proceeded to have the stuffing knocked out of me. I grew up...FAST. I graduated at 17 and sat for my boards the day after my 18th birthday. If my birthday had been even a day later, I would've been forced to wait the 4 or 6 months until state boards were held again. Yes, this was in the 80's, which makes me a COB.

    My first job was on a Med-Surg floor of the hospital that offered the LPN program. I wanted to work 3rd shift as a GPN, but couldn't, as I needed a work permit. Yes, I was embarrassed.

    I went right into an ADN program immediately after I finished the LPN program in July. My birthday is at the end of September, which means I was 17 for the first few weeks of the ADN program. I vaguely remember discussing it with my first CI, and I think I was able to start clinicals because I had already graduated from the PN program. If I hadn't passed my boards on the first try, however, I think I would've been jettisoned from the ADN program pretty quickly.

    If I had the opportunity to start over, I probably would have taken more courses at a community college, perhaps studied abroad for a semester, or any one of the exciting things that I could have done in those "pre-mortgage/relationship/marriage/kids/life/etc" years. I don't regret going into Nursing, but I do wish that I hadn't been so gosh darned impatient.

    My son is in a similar situation, as he participated in a dual enrollment program at the community college where I currently teach. Starting in his sophomore year in HS, he took college level courses and received both HS and college credits. He graduated from HS in June 2016, and had enough college credits to transfer to an Engineering program...if he wanted. Instead, we've encouraged him to take courses that "sounded neat" as well as pursuing anything that he had ever thought to himself, "I wonder what it would be like to..." He took an introductory piano class...and quickly learned that he's better suited as a music aficionado rather than a musician. He took an ASL class and earned himself a "therapeutic F" by ignoring the syllabus, and replaced the F with an A by repeating the course (paid 100% out of his own pocket, too.) This semester, he's taking a heavy math and science course load, as well as a fencing class. I'm doing my best to encourage him, but inwardly cringing as well. All of these experiences are helping him develop skills and insight that are setting him up to be a much more successful, well-rounded Engineering student.

    I understand your daughter's desire to forge ahead and finish college as quickly as possible. I felt the same way. However, she has opportunities available to her that are quite unique, given her age. My suggestion would be to choose some situations she had never imagined experiencing...and experience them. She has the time to take classes for the sake of satisfying her curiosity, trying something entirely new, without worrying about completing a degree on a strict timeline. (I agree, however, that she needs to be aware of any financial aid limits, and consider taking courses through a community college or utilizing private scholarships.)

    Good luck to her!

    Mercury's Mom

  • Jan 12

    Quote from Asystole RN
    I know a nurse who was licensed at 18, as in she graduated BEFORE she turned 18.
    This was me. I entered a hospital-based LPN program at 16 and proceeded to have the stuffing knocked out of me. I grew up...FAST. I graduated at 17 and sat for my boards the day after my 18th birthday. If my birthday had been even a day later, I would've been forced to wait the 4 or 6 months until state boards were held again. Yes, this was in the 80's, which makes me a COB.

    My first job was on a Med-Surg floor of the hospital that offered the LPN program. I wanted to work 3rd shift as a GPN, but couldn't, as I needed a work permit. Yes, I was embarrassed.

    I went right into an ADN program immediately after I finished the LPN program in July. My birthday is at the end of September, which means I was 17 for the first few weeks of the ADN program. I vaguely remember discussing it with my first CI, and I think I was able to start clinicals because I had already graduated from the PN program. If I hadn't passed my boards on the first try, however, I think I would've been jettisoned from the ADN program pretty quickly.

    If I had the opportunity to start over, I probably would have taken more courses at a community college, perhaps studied abroad for a semester, or any one of the exciting things that I could have done in those "pre-mortgage/relationship/marriage/kids/life/etc" years. I don't regret going into Nursing, but I do wish that I hadn't been so gosh darned impatient.

    My son is in a similar situation, as he participated in a dual enrollment program at the community college where I currently teach. Starting in his sophomore year in HS, he took college level courses and received both HS and college credits. He graduated from HS in June 2016, and had enough college credits to transfer to an Engineering program...if he wanted. Instead, we've encouraged him to take courses that "sounded neat" as well as pursuing anything that he had ever thought to himself, "I wonder what it would be like to..." He took an introductory piano class...and quickly learned that he's better suited as a music aficionado rather than a musician. He took an ASL class and earned himself a "therapeutic F" by ignoring the syllabus, and replaced the F with an A by repeating the course (paid 100% out of his own pocket, too.) This semester, he's taking a heavy math and science course load, as well as a fencing class. I'm doing my best to encourage him, but inwardly cringing as well. All of these experiences are helping him develop skills and insight that are setting him up to be a much more successful, well-rounded Engineering student.

    I understand your daughter's desire to forge ahead and finish college as quickly as possible. I felt the same way. However, she has opportunities available to her that are quite unique, given her age. My suggestion would be to choose some situations she had never imagined experiencing...and experience them. She has the time to take classes for the sake of satisfying her curiosity, trying something entirely new, without worrying about completing a degree on a strict timeline. (I agree, however, that she needs to be aware of any financial aid limits, and consider taking courses through a community college or utilizing private scholarships.)

    Good luck to her!

    Mercury's Mom

  • Jan 12

    Quote from Asystole RN
    I know a nurse who was licensed at 18, as in she graduated BEFORE she turned 18.
    This was me. I entered a hospital-based LPN program at 16 and proceeded to have the stuffing knocked out of me. I grew up...FAST. I graduated at 17 and sat for my boards the day after my 18th birthday. If my birthday had been even a day later, I would've been forced to wait the 4 or 6 months until state boards were held again. Yes, this was in the 80's, which makes me a COB.

    My first job was on a Med-Surg floor of the hospital that offered the LPN program. I wanted to work 3rd shift as a GPN, but couldn't, as I needed a work permit. Yes, I was embarrassed.

    I went right into an ADN program immediately after I finished the LPN program in July. My birthday is at the end of September, which means I was 17 for the first few weeks of the ADN program. I vaguely remember discussing it with my first CI, and I think I was able to start clinicals because I had already graduated from the PN program. If I hadn't passed my boards on the first try, however, I think I would've been jettisoned from the ADN program pretty quickly.

    If I had the opportunity to start over, I probably would have taken more courses at a community college, perhaps studied abroad for a semester, or any one of the exciting things that I could have done in those "pre-mortgage/relationship/marriage/kids/life/etc" years. I don't regret going into Nursing, but I do wish that I hadn't been so gosh darned impatient.

    My son is in a similar situation, as he participated in a dual enrollment program at the community college where I currently teach. Starting in his sophomore year in HS, he took college level courses and received both HS and college credits. He graduated from HS in June 2016, and had enough college credits to transfer to an Engineering program...if he wanted. Instead, we've encouraged him to take courses that "sounded neat" as well as pursuing anything that he had ever thought to himself, "I wonder what it would be like to..." He took an introductory piano class...and quickly learned that he's better suited as a music aficionado rather than a musician. He took an ASL class and earned himself a "therapeutic F" by ignoring the syllabus, and replaced the F with an A by repeating the course (paid 100% out of his own pocket, too.) This semester, he's taking a heavy math and science course load, as well as a fencing class. I'm doing my best to encourage him, but inwardly cringing as well. All of these experiences are helping him develop skills and insight that are setting him up to be a much more successful, well-rounded Engineering student.

    I understand your daughter's desire to forge ahead and finish college as quickly as possible. I felt the same way. However, she has opportunities available to her that are quite unique, given her age. My suggestion would be to choose some situations she had never imagined experiencing...and experience them. She has the time to take classes for the sake of satisfying her curiosity, trying something entirely new, without worrying about completing a degree on a strict timeline. (I agree, however, that she needs to be aware of any financial aid limits, and consider taking courses through a community college or utilizing private scholarships.)

    Good luck to her!

    Mercury's Mom

  • Jan 12

    Quote from Asystole RN
    I know a nurse who was licensed at 18, as in she graduated BEFORE she turned 18.
    This was me. I entered a hospital-based LPN program at 16 and proceeded to have the stuffing knocked out of me. I grew up...FAST. I graduated at 17 and sat for my boards the day after my 18th birthday. If my birthday had been even a day later, I would've been forced to wait the 4 or 6 months until state boards were held again. Yes, this was in the 80's, which makes me a COB.

    My first job was on a Med-Surg floor of the hospital that offered the LPN program. I wanted to work 3rd shift as a GPN, but couldn't, as I needed a work permit. Yes, I was embarrassed.

    I went right into an ADN program immediately after I finished the LPN program in July. My birthday is at the end of September, which means I was 17 for the first few weeks of the ADN program. I vaguely remember discussing it with my first CI, and I think I was able to start clinicals because I had already graduated from the PN program. If I hadn't passed my boards on the first try, however, I think I would've been jettisoned from the ADN program pretty quickly.

    If I had the opportunity to start over, I probably would have taken more courses at a community college, perhaps studied abroad for a semester, or any one of the exciting things that I could have done in those "pre-mortgage/relationship/marriage/kids/life/etc" years. I don't regret going into Nursing, but I do wish that I hadn't been so gosh darned impatient.

    My son is in a similar situation, as he participated in a dual enrollment program at the community college where I currently teach. Starting in his sophomore year in HS, he took college level courses and received both HS and college credits. He graduated from HS in June 2016, and had enough college credits to transfer to an Engineering program...if he wanted. Instead, we've encouraged him to take courses that "sounded neat" as well as pursuing anything that he had ever thought to himself, "I wonder what it would be like to..." He took an introductory piano class...and quickly learned that he's better suited as a music aficionado rather than a musician. He took an ASL class and earned himself a "therapeutic F" by ignoring the syllabus, and replaced the F with an A by repeating the course (paid 100% out of his own pocket, too.) This semester, he's taking a heavy math and science course load, as well as a fencing class. I'm doing my best to encourage him, but inwardly cringing as well. All of these experiences are helping him develop skills and insight that are setting him up to be a much more successful, well-rounded Engineering student.

    I understand your daughter's desire to forge ahead and finish college as quickly as possible. I felt the same way. However, she has opportunities available to her that are quite unique, given her age. My suggestion would be to choose some situations she had never imagined experiencing...and experience them. She has the time to take classes for the sake of satisfying her curiosity, trying something entirely new, without worrying about completing a degree on a strict timeline. (I agree, however, that she needs to be aware of any financial aid limits, and consider taking courses through a community college or utilizing private scholarships.)

    Good luck to her!

    Mercury's Mom

  • Nov 4 '16

    Fire retardant bibs for smokers.

    The way the test tube would heat up after you put in the clinitest tablet to check sugar in urine. Not really something one should multitask...I don't know how many test tube I dropped and broke because I held it too close to the bottom.

    Cleaning inner cannulas of Jackson trachs. Brush and bowls were from sterile supply closet and H2O2 and sterile water came in big jugs.

    Harris drips for post-op gas relief

    milk and Molasses enemas...and the smell going in vs coming out (gag)

    Being reprimanded for wearing gloves while bathing a newborn because "What will the mother think if you see her baby as "dirty" and refuse to touch it?"

    "Pouring meds". The med room had communal bottles of pretty much every tablet and meds were prepared in soufflé cups nested into a green tray with holes. The med cards for each patient went into a slot above each corresponding cup. Pray like heck that the patient didn't ask what meds they were getting and what each one was for. And heaven help you if you slip and fall while carrying the tray!

    mm

  • Nov 2 '16

    Fire retardant bibs for smokers.

    The way the test tube would heat up after you put in the clinitest tablet to check sugar in urine. Not really something one should multitask...I don't know how many test tube I dropped and broke because I held it too close to the bottom.

    Cleaning inner cannulas of Jackson trachs. Brush and bowls were from sterile supply closet and H2O2 and sterile water came in big jugs.

    Harris drips for post-op gas relief

    milk and Molasses enemas...and the smell going in vs coming out (gag)

    Being reprimanded for wearing gloves while bathing a newborn because "What will the mother think if you see her baby as "dirty" and refuse to touch it?"

    "Pouring meds". The med room had communal bottles of pretty much every tablet and meds were prepared in soufflé cups nested into a green tray with holes. The med cards for each patient went into a slot above each corresponding cup. Pray like heck that the patient didn't ask what meds they were getting and what each one was for. And heaven help you if you slip and fall while carrying the tray!

    mm

  • Nov 2 '16

    Fire retardant bibs for smokers.

    The way the test tube would heat up after you put in the clinitest tablet to check sugar in urine. Not really something one should multitask...I don't know how many test tube I dropped and broke because I held it too close to the bottom.

    Cleaning inner cannulas of Jackson trachs. Brush and bowls were from sterile supply closet and H2O2 and sterile water came in big jugs.

    Harris drips for post-op gas relief

    milk and Molasses enemas...and the smell going in vs coming out (gag)

    Being reprimanded for wearing gloves while bathing a newborn because "What will the mother think if you see her baby as "dirty" and refuse to touch it?"

    "Pouring meds". The med room had communal bottles of pretty much every tablet and meds were prepared in soufflé cups nested into a green tray with holes. The med cards for each patient went into a slot above each corresponding cup. Pray like heck that the patient didn't ask what meds they were getting and what each one was for. And heaven help you if you slip and fall while carrying the tray!

    mm

  • Oct 30 '16

    Fire retardant bibs for smokers.

    The way the test tube would heat up after you put in the clinitest tablet to check sugar in urine. Not really something one should multitask...I don't know how many test tube I dropped and broke because I held it too close to the bottom.

    Cleaning inner cannulas of Jackson trachs. Brush and bowls were from sterile supply closet and H2O2 and sterile water came in big jugs.

    Harris drips for post-op gas relief

    milk and Molasses enemas...and the smell going in vs coming out (gag)

    Being reprimanded for wearing gloves while bathing a newborn because "What will the mother think if you see her baby as "dirty" and refuse to touch it?"

    "Pouring meds". The med room had communal bottles of pretty much every tablet and meds were prepared in soufflé cups nested into a green tray with holes. The med cards for each patient went into a slot above each corresponding cup. Pray like heck that the patient didn't ask what meds they were getting and what each one was for. And heaven help you if you slip and fall while carrying the tray!

    mm

  • Oct 30 '16

    Fire retardant bibs for smokers.

    The way the test tube would heat up after you put in the clinitest tablet to check sugar in urine. Not really something one should multitask...I don't know how many test tube I dropped and broke because I held it too close to the bottom.

    Cleaning inner cannulas of Jackson trachs. Brush and bowls were from sterile supply closet and H2O2 and sterile water came in big jugs.

    Harris drips for post-op gas relief

    milk and Molasses enemas...and the smell going in vs coming out (gag)

    Being reprimanded for wearing gloves while bathing a newborn because "What will the mother think if you see her baby as "dirty" and refuse to touch it?"

    "Pouring meds". The med room had communal bottles of pretty much every tablet and meds were prepared in soufflé cups nested into a green tray with holes. The med cards for each patient went into a slot above each corresponding cup. Pray like heck that the patient didn't ask what meds they were getting and what each one was for. And heaven help you if you slip and fall while carrying the tray!

    mm

  • Oct 30 '16

    Fire retardant bibs for smokers.

    The way the test tube would heat up after you put in the clinitest tablet to check sugar in urine. Not really something one should multitask...I don't know how many test tube I dropped and broke because I held it too close to the bottom.

    Cleaning inner cannulas of Jackson trachs. Brush and bowls were from sterile supply closet and H2O2 and sterile water came in big jugs.

    Harris drips for post-op gas relief

    milk and Molasses enemas...and the smell going in vs coming out (gag)

    Being reprimanded for wearing gloves while bathing a newborn because "What will the mother think if you see her baby as "dirty" and refuse to touch it?"

    "Pouring meds". The med room had communal bottles of pretty much every tablet and meds were prepared in soufflé cups nested into a green tray with holes. The med cards for each patient went into a slot above each corresponding cup. Pray like heck that the patient didn't ask what meds they were getting and what each one was for. And heaven help you if you slip and fall while carrying the tray!

    mm

  • Oct 30 '16

    Fire retardant bibs for smokers.

    The way the test tube would heat up after you put in the clinitest tablet to check sugar in urine. Not really something one should multitask...I don't know how many test tube I dropped and broke because I held it too close to the bottom.

    Cleaning inner cannulas of Jackson trachs. Brush and bowls were from sterile supply closet and H2O2 and sterile water came in big jugs.

    Harris drips for post-op gas relief

    milk and Molasses enemas...and the smell going in vs coming out (gag)

    Being reprimanded for wearing gloves while bathing a newborn because "What will the mother think if you see her baby as "dirty" and refuse to touch it?"

    "Pouring meds". The med room had communal bottles of pretty much every tablet and meds were prepared in soufflé cups nested into a green tray with holes. The med cards for each patient went into a slot above each corresponding cup. Pray like heck that the patient didn't ask what meds they were getting and what each one was for. And heaven help you if you slip and fall while carrying the tray!

    mm

  • Oct 29 '16

    Fire retardant bibs for smokers.

    The way the test tube would heat up after you put in the clinitest tablet to check sugar in urine. Not really something one should multitask...I don't know how many test tube I dropped and broke because I held it too close to the bottom.

    Cleaning inner cannulas of Jackson trachs. Brush and bowls were from sterile supply closet and H2O2 and sterile water came in big jugs.

    Harris drips for post-op gas relief

    milk and Molasses enemas...and the smell going in vs coming out (gag)

    Being reprimanded for wearing gloves while bathing a newborn because "What will the mother think if you see her baby as "dirty" and refuse to touch it?"

    "Pouring meds". The med room had communal bottles of pretty much every tablet and meds were prepared in soufflé cups nested into a green tray with holes. The med cards for each patient went into a slot above each corresponding cup. Pray like heck that the patient didn't ask what meds they were getting and what each one was for. And heaven help you if you slip and fall while carrying the tray!

    mm


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