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mercurysmom, RN 6,673 Views

Joined Jul 25, '11 - from 'New England'. mercurysmom is a Disabilities Advocate; Consultant. She has '27' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Early Intervention, Nsg. Education'. Posts: 165 (72% Liked) Likes: 551

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  • Oct 20

    This is from a LTC facility: "tonic water 4oz PO PRN per pt request to burp or fart." This was for a LOL who had a bowel obsession and was on at least 4 scheduled stool softener and laxatives and had a fit if she went 12 hours without a "movement." With all those bowel meds, I'd be afraid to fart!

  • Sep 30

    In homcare? I wouldn't chance it. The first time anything lands on a wet surface and a spot goes through the page onto someone's kitchen table...

    There are so many quirky aspects to home care (visiting nurse or private duty) that could end up with your supervisor calling you in to discuss some inconscionable act that the client/parent complained about, like...oh, I don't know, using more than 4 squares of toilet paper during your 12 hour shift, mixing formula at 4:59 instead of 5:00PM on the dot, re-dressing a child in pants that didn't come with the shirt because the pants got wet but the shirt is still clean, getting a microscopic spot of betadine on a disposable chux after straight cathing...

    The super duper important and life-threatening stuff. Obviously. ;-)

    Why add even a theoretical catastrophe to the list if you don't have to?

    mm

  • Sep 15

    My kid was drawn to the nurse's office like a moth to a flame. He received meds every day and also had snacks available (metabolic disorder). He never faked actual illness, fortunately, since that usually ended with stuff that he avoided at all costs. Boredom often became hunger, so he needed to take a leisurely trip down to her office. Math made him particularly hungry. When we amended his IHCP, we sent cans of Pediasure to the math classroom, and he could only go to the nurse's office if he had anything going on besides hunger/thirst. His visits dropped by more than 50%. Imagine that!

    So Hubby and I are [I]those parents [I] who worked with the school to keep his butt in his seat and cut down the social visits. :-D Meanies!!!

    mm

  • Sep 15

    My kid was drawn to the nurse's office like a moth to a flame. He received meds every day and also had snacks available (metabolic disorder). He never faked actual illness, fortunately, since that usually ended with stuff that he avoided at all costs. Boredom often became hunger, so he needed to take a leisurely trip down to her office. Math made him particularly hungry. When we amended his IHCP, we sent cans of Pediasure to the math classroom, and he could only go to the nurse's office if he had anything going on besides hunger/thirst. His visits dropped by more than 50%. Imagine that!

    So Hubby and I are [I]those parents [I] who worked with the school to keep his butt in his seat and cut down the social visits. :-D Meanies!!!

    mm

  • Sep 8

    My kid was drawn to the nurse's office like a moth to a flame. He received meds every day and also had snacks available (metabolic disorder). He never faked actual illness, fortunately, since that usually ended with stuff that he avoided at all costs. Boredom often became hunger, so he needed to take a leisurely trip down to her office. Math made him particularly hungry. When we amended his IHCP, we sent cans of Pediasure to the math classroom, and he could only go to the nurse's office if he had anything going on besides hunger/thirst. His visits dropped by more than 50%. Imagine that!

    So Hubby and I are [I]those parents [I] who worked with the school to keep his butt in his seat and cut down the social visits. :-D Meanies!!!

    mm

  • Sep 8

    In homcare? I wouldn't chance it. The first time anything lands on a wet surface and a spot goes through the page onto someone's kitchen table...

    There are so many quirky aspects to home care (visiting nurse or private duty) that could end up with your supervisor calling you in to discuss some inconscionable act that the client/parent complained about, like...oh, I don't know, using more than 4 squares of toilet paper during your 12 hour shift, mixing formula at 4:59 instead of 5:00PM on the dot, re-dressing a child in pants that didn't come with the shirt because the pants got wet but the shirt is still clean, getting a microscopic spot of betadine on a disposable chux after straight cathing...

    The super duper important and life-threatening stuff. Obviously. ;-)

    Why add even a theoretical catastrophe to the list if you don't have to?

    mm

  • Sep 7

    In homcare? I wouldn't chance it. The first time anything lands on a wet surface and a spot goes through the page onto someone's kitchen table...

    There are so many quirky aspects to home care (visiting nurse or private duty) that could end up with your supervisor calling you in to discuss some inconscionable act that the client/parent complained about, like...oh, I don't know, using more than 4 squares of toilet paper during your 12 hour shift, mixing formula at 4:59 instead of 5:00PM on the dot, re-dressing a child in pants that didn't come with the shirt because the pants got wet but the shirt is still clean, getting a microscopic spot of betadine on a disposable chux after straight cathing...

    The super duper important and life-threatening stuff. Obviously. ;-)

    Why add even a theoretical catastrophe to the list if you don't have to?

    mm

  • Sep 7

    My kid was drawn to the nurse's office like a moth to a flame. He received meds every day and also had snacks available (metabolic disorder). He never faked actual illness, fortunately, since that usually ended with stuff that he avoided at all costs. Boredom often became hunger, so he needed to take a leisurely trip down to her office. Math made him particularly hungry. When we amended his IHCP, we sent cans of Pediasure to the math classroom, and he could only go to the nurse's office if he had anything going on besides hunger/thirst. His visits dropped by more than 50%. Imagine that!

    So Hubby and I are [I]those parents [I] who worked with the school to keep his butt in his seat and cut down the social visits. :-D Meanies!!!

    mm

  • Sep 7

    In homcare? I wouldn't chance it. The first time anything lands on a wet surface and a spot goes through the page onto someone's kitchen table...

    There are so many quirky aspects to home care (visiting nurse or private duty) that could end up with your supervisor calling you in to discuss some inconscionable act that the client/parent complained about, like...oh, I don't know, using more than 4 squares of toilet paper during your 12 hour shift, mixing formula at 4:59 instead of 5:00PM on the dot, re-dressing a child in pants that didn't come with the shirt because the pants got wet but the shirt is still clean, getting a microscopic spot of betadine on a disposable chux after straight cathing...

    The super duper important and life-threatening stuff. Obviously. ;-)

    Why add even a theoretical catastrophe to the list if you don't have to?

    mm

  • Aug 2

    I've experienced a weird, yet similar situation...someone was using her own name, but my address as her own! I found out about it by registered mail from the state board...of Cosmetology! (One look at my hair would be enough to know that I'm definitely not a cosmetologist!) She had received her license, which evidently had been mailed to my home address. She must have been staking out our mailbox. I don't know how long it had gone on, since the first time I ever saw her name was on a registered letter from the licensing board. I filed a complaint and had all of our mail transferred to a P.O. box for several years, and made sure that all packages received a signature on delivery which was a major PITA. Fortunately, my husband and I didn't lose any money, or get any "funny" credit card statements or letters regarding our professional licenses, but we paid for identity theft protection just in case. We had our credit reports flagged, as well as the SS#'s of our kids (including our youngest child, who passed away 10 years ago.)

    I know you have enough to worry about simply with this bizarre letter that could potentially threaten your livelihood, but while you're getting everything straightened out you might want to take the opportunity to double check your credit report, home/auto/life/health insurance, and your electronic footprint as well. People do awful things. One person's crazy action (using our address as her own) cost us an awful lot of money in damage control. It could have been MUCH worse, though.

    Best,
    mm

  • Jul 10

    I'm one of those people who need to stop and think when I encounter < or >. I was consistently hopelessly confused by then in elementary school. In desperation, perhaps, my second grade teacher taught me to think "Arrow points to the smaller number." Light bulb moment!

    Now I'm working in Adult Basic Ed and initially I teach the words for the symbols separate from the equation. Most of the adult students I've encountered completely missed the concept if they were expected to learn it in grade school.

    I love love love the idea of writing out "systolic BP less than 120" rather than SBP<120. Kind of like the old orders for APAP gr X q4h.

  • May 8

    My son had a similar experience. He took ASL1 and didn't study or do the work. His lack of effort earned him an F. (I'm Deaf and we sign at home, so he really had to work hard to fail that class!) We now refer to it as his "therapeutic F." Honestly, it was the best thing that could have happened to him. He retook the class on his own dime and earned an A. All of that "you're responsible for your own education" lecturing that went in one ear and out the other finally stuck! He'll be earning an AS in Computer Engineering after the Fall 2018 semester and plans to transfer to one of the big geeky schools full of students just like him.

    Your path to a nursing degree is nowhere near over. In fact, I'd say that you're much closer than you were before you had that "therapeutic F" semester. Consider it a learning experience, retake the classes, and move forward.

    mm

  • Apr 17

    This probably sounds a bit strange, but losing my hearing has actually improved my career as a Nurse Educator.

    In 2006, I developed pneumonia (multi-drug resistant pseudomonas) and required an extended course of IV Tobramycin. I have a maternally-inherited progressive neuromuscular disease, and my medical team knew that I was extremely sensitive to the ototoxic effects of aminoglycoside ABX. I had to make a choice between risking my hearing or my life, so what could I do? Anyways, six months after that, I had a profound bilateral SNHL in the 100 dB+ range in all frequencies. However, I was alive! Can't complain too much about that.

    What can a person do when given a six month life expectancy and they exhibit "failure to die?" Return to college and start a business, of course! I became certified in Deaf Studies and started taking classes towards my MPH. Unfortunately, I had to give up my goal of becoming a Public Health Nurse because I'm technology-dependent (power chair, vent, long term PN and IV hydration, etc.). So, I'm working towards a M.Ed focusing on Technology and Distance Learning in Adult Basic Education, specifically as it affects individuals in the Deaf community. While receiving Hospice services, I let my teaching license lapse, so I'm retaking the licensure exams this fall. Fortunately, I kept my RN license active. There's no way I would be able to complete a refresher course with a practicum in my condition.

    I'm self-employed educator and advocate. I am contracted by area colleges as a guest speaker. I lecture about communication, disability awareness, and health literacy. In addition, I offer on-site continuing Ed workshops for Early Intervention programs, primary and secondary schools, and LTC facilities. I have been contracted by several non-profit groups to provide information about a variety of topics through webinars, articles, and lectures. I am fluent in ASL, and I teach English literacy and numeracy to Deaf adults. Sometimes, I'm contracted through my state Voc Rehab to provide short term tutoring for Deaf HS and college students, or clients involved in vocational programs, including CNA courses. I have experience with assistive technology that could help d/D/HH nursing students succeed in the classroom and clinical sites. Feel free to PM me for info regarding AT and scholarships.

    Mercury's Mom

  • Mar 22

    In my experience, it's been poorly crushed meds that gum up the tube rather than formula. All the meds given thru a 60ml syringe, then water to clear the syringe but not enough to clear the tube as well. I've been a J-tuber myself for 6 years. Clogged tubes at home? Once. Clogged tubes inpatient? Can't count!
    mm

  • Feb 13

    I'm self-employed, and while my disabilities provide me with a unique perspective in many ways, I generally don't advertise the fact that I'm disabled when I'm setting up a workshop or other services with a new client.

    Since I'm hired as a private contractor, I often need to bid on jobs. I'm Deaf and fluent in ASL. Interpreters are expensive! If I disclose any accommodation requirements during the bidding process, there's no way I'll get the job. Instead, I've hired 2 individuals and paid for them to learn C-Print captioning. I bought the software and hardware myself, and pay my captionists privately. Right before the workshop, I confirm that the space is wheelchair accessible and that I can access the site's Wifi in order to use the C-Print program in addition to whatever AV needs I have for my presentation.

    I hate to say it, but unfortunately it's true: in certain situations, there's definitely an advantage to having a disability, especially if it's a "visible" disability with cheap or no-cost accommodations. So, if I go into a conference as a guest speaker with a wheelchair, service dog, and provide my own accommodations for my deafness? Home run! Check all those boxes without changing the bottom line! However, I still do run into biases from time to time, which is why I am very careful not to disclose any more personal info than absolutely necessary, and I make sure that my C.V. reads "Advocate" more than "person with disabilities."

    Most of my work comes via word-of-mouth, repeat clients, and existing contracts via my state Voc Rehab and local colleges (I teach at a local CC.) I'm pretty sure that there have been a few jobs that I've been hired for specifically because of my disabilities, which can get a bit uncomfortable if I let the discussion drift too close to the "So, what's wrong with you?" boundary line. I do answer questions in a very general way, and I am comfortable discussing my DME needs if it's relevant to the topic I've been hired to discuss.

    The only question I absolutely will NOT answer is "If you're disabled, why are you working?" [emoji19] :::sigh:::


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