Latest Likes For mercurysmom

Latest Likes For mercurysmom

mercurysmom, RN 5,160 Views

Joined Jul 25, '11 - from 'New England'. mercurysmom is a Disabilities Advocate; Consultant. She has '27' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Early Intervention, Nsg. Education'. Posts: 156 (71% Liked) Likes: 515

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Sep 16

    Quote from amoLucia
    The old saying is that 'NECESSITY is the mother of invention'. I hold that it really is nursing.

    We all have so, so many 'tricks of the trade' that help us overcome difficulties with equipment or lack of supplies. Remember before we had the precut gtube/trach dressings. We would just chevron-type fold 4x4s. And I've made my own Montgomery straps to help secure wound dressings. I just think it's amazing how experience from the 'old days' so freq helps us out in a pinch!

    Anyone remember scultetus (sp?) binders - the old fabric ones?
    Scultetus binders...oh my YES! Bellies that looked like braided bread. The patients seemed to have so much more support though.

    Harris drips for post op ileus with gas pains.

    Wasn't there a span of several years sometime in the late 80's that everyone in the NH seemed to get sprays of granulex to one bony prominence or another? And it stained white uniforms permanently!

  • Sep 16

    Quote from amoLucia
    The old saying is that 'NECESSITY is the mother of invention'. I hold that it really is nursing.

    We all have so, so many 'tricks of the trade' that help us overcome difficulties with equipment or lack of supplies. Remember before we had the precut gtube/trach dressings. We would just chevron-type fold 4x4s. And I've made my own Montgomery straps to help secure wound dressings. I just think it's amazing how experience from the 'old days' so freq helps us out in a pinch!

    Anyone remember scultetus (sp?) binders - the old fabric ones?
    Scultetus binders...oh my YES! Bellies that looked like braided bread. The patients seemed to have so much more support though.

    Harris drips for post op ileus with gas pains.

    Wasn't there a span of several years sometime in the late 80's that everyone in the NH seemed to get sprays of granulex to one bony prominence or another? And it stained white uniforms permanently!

  • Aug 19

    Congratulations OMG! Returning to nursing after a ten-year hiatus would be difficult for just about anyone; returning after being out of the field that length of time AND returning after a situation like yours is downright amazing!

    While many people choose not to disclose a hidden or mental illness, I would be concerned that any prescription meds you're taking for your condition may show up on a random urine tox screen. Obviously you could provide evidence that the med is treating an illness, but having to "back-pedal" to explain your reasons for taking the med might be viewed in a negative light, as if you had something to hide. I agree with xtxrn; state the facts about your disability along with an explanation that it was secondary to an event that is very unlikely to happen again and has been successfully managed through meds and treatments. I'm not sure how detailed you *have* to be in this letter. Does anyone know ? I'm very curious myself!

    It sounds like the refresher course is quite thorough, offering both clinical and classroom components. I wish you a smooth transition and a fulfilling career. Your experience from both sides of the stethescope will be an asset, as it's been for so many of us in similar positions.

    Happy thoughts coming your way!

    mercurysmom

  • Aug 15

    This was one of my Mom's stories, but since we both worked at the same LTC at one point and had "experiences" with the same Dr, I believe her 100%...

    One night, Mrs. Smith, a pt who was DNR, comfort care, with family at the bedside, finally passed away. Mrs. Smith's Dr routinely wrote orders for "No RN Pronouncement" on all of his patients and refused to refer them to Hospice, either, no matter what their primary Dx was or their current medical condition. (Mrs. Smith was admitted 5 days earlier, with CA mets to everywhere, sub-q morphine pump, scopolamine, etc.)

    So, Mom called "Dr. ImInChargeDontForgetIt" to inform him that's Mrs. Smith's respirations had ceased, no audible apical pulse, no BP, etc. and reminded him that she needed to be pronounced, since he ordered "No RN pronouncement." It was just before midnight, and the family wanted to call the funeral home ASAP. Dr. I said "what the h*** is their rush? I'll be there at 8am.

    Mom politely reminded him that the policy of that particular LTC was that patients who expire before midnight need to be pronounced within 4 hours of the next day, which meant he had a four-hour deadline to come in and pronounce her. Otherwise, she would have to call to have her transported to the ER to be pronounced, since he specified "no RN pronouncement."

    Dr. I pauses, then says...
    "Are there any stab wounds?" "Any bullet holes?"

    Mom says "Of course not!" So Dr. "ImInChargeDontForgetIt" says, "Then leave her in bed, continue all care, and open the damn window. I'll be in at 8!" And slams down the phone.

    Mom called the DON, who came in, did her own assessment, and called to have poor Mrs. Smith transferred to the ER, where the hospital's medical director was waiting for Dr. I to meet her as soon as she arrived (which he did!)

    I worked a few days later...all of Dr. I's DNR/comfort care patients had orders for RN pronouncement andHospice consults! [emoji6]

  • Aug 13

    Quote from BuckyBadgerRN
    I was going to guess that you are very young, and then saw in your tag line that you're 18. This isn't high school anymore. We're talking about your future CAREER here. You need to worry about YOU and if your friend can't understand that, then she's no friend. This is a great time to grow a spine and just tell her that you have to focus on your studies and don't really have the time to help her with hers. If she feels she has ADD, she needs to take it upon herself to be evaluated. Do not let her guilt you into doing for her what she needs to do for herself
    This. I agree 100%.

    As for your family members who are giving you a hard time for "not helping her in her time of need," her time of need was the first day of class! She had several options available to her, but she *chose* not to pursue them.

    This is not her time of need. It is her time of desperation. A couple tutoring sessions will not radically change the trajectory that SHE established, all by herself, on the first day of class.

  • Aug 10

    When I was in a hospital-based LPN program 26ish years ago, we were taught that a back rub was essential. So were hand soaks and foot soaks. And positioning with trochanter rolls and some kind of foam block to prevent foot drop. Since it was a hospital-based program, we had tons of clinical hours and by the end of the program we were taking a full assignment, back rubs and all.

    When I entered RN school right after graduating from the LPN program, I was able to skip 1st semester fundamentals by challenging the lab practical, which did include a back rub, as I recall. None of my classes from LPN school were transferable, so I took a full load of academic classes at the same time as my nursing classes, and I still graduated with my ASN in 4 semesters. I know I wasn't the only one who did it that way. When did the pre-requisite vs co-requisite system start? I never really thought about that until now, since none of my classes were transferred. I did manage to take several CLEP exams to get the basics out of the way, though.

    Oh gosh, does this mean I'm a COB?😱

  • Aug 5

    Anticholinergic crisis. Can't see, can't pee, can't spit, can't...

  • Aug 3

    "1700: Pt A&Ox4, steady on feet, independently amb in hallway q15min, denies discomfort or anxiety, states "I'm waiting for my boyfriend, the ********** said he was on his way."
    2010: pt not in room. unit searched, security notified. Pt discovered in ambulance bay, escorted back to floor. Pt drowsy, pinpoint pupils, Pulse 55 reg, Resp 12/min. Clave missing from saline lock, tubing tied in a knot. MD notified, new order rec'd for narcan if resps<8 or LOC, remove PIV. Pt remains on 1:1 supervision. "

    I hope I'm the off-going shift!

  • Jul 30

    "1700: Pt A&Ox4, steady on feet, independently amb in hallway q15min, denies discomfort or anxiety, states "I'm waiting for my boyfriend, the ********** said he was on his way."
    2010: pt not in room. unit searched, security notified. Pt discovered in ambulance bay, escorted back to floor. Pt drowsy, pinpoint pupils, Pulse 55 reg, Resp 12/min. Clave missing from saline lock, tubing tied in a knot. MD notified, new order rec'd for narcan if resps<8 or LOC, remove PIV. Pt remains on 1:1 supervision. "

    I hope I'm the off-going shift!

  • Jul 27

    Some community colleges allow students to retake a class to earn a higher grade. The previous attempt stays on the transcript, but the grade of the retake is the one counted in the GPA. This can only be done once per class.

    I earned my ADN in 2 years, but this was 27 years ago (and I had already completed a hospital LPN school.) in order to keep up with the work and graduate on time, I took as many CLEP exams as I could, and I took the few courses that I couldn't CLEP and might impact my GPA at a different CC and transferred the credits to my RN program.

    Here's the link to info about CLEP exams: CLEP - College Level Examination Program (CLEP) -Save Time. Save Money. Take CLEP | College Board CLEP Site
    Here's the link to DSST, another exam program similar to CLEP but focuses more on business classes, which aren't as easy to apply except as electives, or could help if you're eventually hoping to get into the business end of nursing: http://getcollegecredit.com/assets/p..._Exam_List.pdf

    Before taking CLEP exams, check with your college to see if they award credits for completed exams or if they only count them as exemptions, without credits awarded. In addition, the exams are pass/fail, so if it's a course that you know will boost your GPA you'd probably be better off taking it online or at a brick-and-mortar college.

    Many online businesses offer "prep courses" for CLEP exams, which seems like it kinda defeats the purpose of taking the exams, which is to save money and time. (CLEP exams cost $80 for a 3 to 4 credit course.). If you feel like you need a quick review of the subject before the exam, check open courseware to find a free review. If you're learning entirely new material, then the CLEP exam isn't the way to go.

    Good luck! [emoji4]

  • Jul 23

    Quote from HeySis
    Totally off topic beckysue920, but.... how do you find out how well you did on boards. We were told if you pass then that's that. If you fail you get a breakdown of each category and if you were at, above or below passing standard.... But as far as percentages correct, or hardness of the questions, rankings...Just curious, it'd be fun (or terrifying) to see my score.
    Actual scores were given "back in the day." My Mom and I sat for RN boards 10 years apart. We both took the 2 day written test. She received a latter with her score in 1982, and I received a simple "candidate passed" letter in 1992.

  • Jul 23

    Quote from BuckyBadgerRN
    I was going to guess that you are very young, and then saw in your tag line that you're 18. This isn't high school anymore. We're talking about your future CAREER here. You need to worry about YOU and if your friend can't understand that, then she's no friend. This is a great time to grow a spine and just tell her that you have to focus on your studies and don't really have the time to help her with hers. If she feels she has ADD, she needs to take it upon herself to be evaluated. Do not let her guilt you into doing for her what she needs to do for herself
    This. I agree 100%.

    As for your family members who are giving you a hard time for "not helping her in her time of need," her time of need was the first day of class! She had several options available to her, but she *chose* not to pursue them.

    This is not her time of need. It is her time of desperation. A couple tutoring sessions will not radically change the trajectory that SHE established, all by herself, on the first day of class.

  • Jul 22

    This was one of my Mom's stories, but since we both worked at the same LTC at one point and had "experiences" with the same Dr, I believe her 100%...

    One night, Mrs. Smith, a pt who was DNR, comfort care, with family at the bedside, finally passed away. Mrs. Smith's Dr routinely wrote orders for "No RN Pronouncement" on all of his patients and refused to refer them to Hospice, either, no matter what their primary Dx was or their current medical condition. (Mrs. Smith was admitted 5 days earlier, with CA mets to everywhere, sub-q morphine pump, scopolamine, etc.)

    So, Mom called "Dr. ImInChargeDontForgetIt" to inform him that's Mrs. Smith's respirations had ceased, no audible apical pulse, no BP, etc. and reminded him that she needed to be pronounced, since he ordered "No RN pronouncement." It was just before midnight, and the family wanted to call the funeral home ASAP. Dr. I said "what the h*** is their rush? I'll be there at 8am.

    Mom politely reminded him that the policy of that particular LTC was that patients who expire before midnight need to be pronounced within 4 hours of the next day, which meant he had a four-hour deadline to come in and pronounce her. Otherwise, she would have to call to have her transported to the ER to be pronounced, since he specified "no RN pronouncement."

    Dr. I pauses, then says...
    "Are there any stab wounds?" "Any bullet holes?"

    Mom says "Of course not!" So Dr. "ImInChargeDontForgetIt" says, "Then leave her in bed, continue all care, and open the damn window. I'll be in at 8!" And slams down the phone.

    Mom called the DON, who came in, did her own assessment, and called to have poor Mrs. Smith transferred to the ER, where the hospital's medical director was waiting for Dr. I to meet her as soon as she arrived (which he did!)

    I worked a few days later...all of Dr. I's DNR/comfort care patients had orders for RN pronouncement andHospice consults! [emoji6]

  • Jul 22

    Quote from JustBeachyNurse
    That will mean nothing to the IRS. Is this online coursework? Exclusive use can mean your family cannot use the computer. No watching movies unrelated to school. The teacher can say what they want but it will have no baring on the determination as to whether you can utilize a portion of the cost in your itemized deductions. It's not a credit so most students it's irrelevant. It's not a write off bit potentially part of the cost may be included in itemized deductions of your itemized deductions exceed the standard deduction.
    The teacher is not with you 24/7 to ensure you only use the device for school activities.

    Are you taking online classes?
    Just Beachy is right: "exclusive use" means that in the most restrictive sense. Here's an example...

    I have an iPad and a laptop that are strictly for work. (I'm a lecturer and professional tutor.). The laptop is only used by my C-Print Captionist. The only things on the laptop are the C-Print program, my antivirus software, and Google. Google is only used to access email, so that my Captionist can send me a copy of the C-Print transcript after the lecture. The only files stored on it are transcripts and materials/PPT's I use with different lectures. Period. My Captionist doesn't use the laptop to check her email or Facebook page. That's all, folks.

    In addition, I have a dedicated iPad that only contains apps that I use when I'm teaching and/or tutoring. Since I teach in ASL, I end up making videos about core concepts. I use the Collaaj app for that, and then I post them on Blendspace. I also have my account from my dept's Dropbox on the iPad. Other than that, it's just educational apps, student portfolios, ASL dictionaries, and a Videophone app.

    Some of my work is done as a self-employed consultant, so you better believe that the IRS checks up on my deductions. I've never had a problem claiming devices as business expenses. However, I have duplicate devices for personal use. Given Murphy's law and all, if I checked Facebook only once from a business-only device, that's when I'd be asked to provide the laptop and iPad for an audit! [emoji33]

    In other words, unless you have an identical device for personal use and don't let anyone use your school iPad/laptop for anything, even to google a Pizza Hut menu. It just isn't worth the potential trouble.


    mm[emoji252]

  • Jul 22

    Quote from BuckyBadgerRN
    I was going to guess that you are very young, and then saw in your tag line that you're 18. This isn't high school anymore. We're talking about your future CAREER here. You need to worry about YOU and if your friend can't understand that, then she's no friend. This is a great time to grow a spine and just tell her that you have to focus on your studies and don't really have the time to help her with hers. If she feels she has ADD, she needs to take it upon herself to be evaluated. Do not let her guilt you into doing for her what she needs to do for herself
    This. I agree 100%.

    As for your family members who are giving you a hard time for "not helping her in her time of need," her time of need was the first day of class! She had several options available to her, but she *chose* not to pursue them.

    This is not her time of need. It is her time of desperation. A couple tutoring sessions will not radically change the trajectory that SHE established, all by herself, on the first day of class.


close