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mercurysmom 4,274 Views

Joined Jul 25, '11. Posts: 145 (70% Liked) Likes: 466

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  • May 1

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 30

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 27

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 26

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 24

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 23

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 23

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 23

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 23

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 23

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 23

    I would also ask the resident's family about his/her usual showering/bathing routine. I worked in a NH as a NA in the 80's. One particular resident had every single shower marked "refused" for several years. She would only allow a nightly "bird bath" and she had her hair washed and set once a week. She wore long-sleeved shirts and pants every single day, and would wear the same clothes about 3 days in a row. (She wore a nightgown to bed, and carefully folded her clothes and put them in a drawer each night.). She was alert and oriented and required very little assistance with ADL's; NA's only helped her with her feet, legs, and back and she did the rest. She spoke Polish and very little English.

    Her son was able to explain everything. She was a Holocaust survivor, and bore unimaginable physical, mental, and emotional scars from her ordeal. Her care plan should have been changed to reflect her bathing and other preferences, rather than documenting shower refusals for years on end.

  • Apr 17

    My LPN program was a hospital program that had included dorms up until about 5 years prior, so a student who was even less than 5 minutes early to clinical was met with gasps and horrified expressions.

    My RN (ADN) program had its share of late arrivals, which really blew my mind. Unfortunately, since there are so many nursing schools in my area, there's a major fight for clinical sites, and my school apparently drew the short straw one year when it came to psych rotation. The site was in a hospital a good 70 miles from the school. The school was also famous at that time for being the only college to keep campuses open, even when the local universities with on-campus housing closed. So, one morning I woke up to a good foot of snow with a couple inches of ice on top of that, and left home at 4am to get to my 7am (6:45) clinical. Wouldn't you know it, the school canceled classes...but everyone showed up for clinicals, on time! We worked through the day and had an informal "study day" at the end of the semester. [emoji4]

  • Mar 30

    Strangely enough, I remember my first day of LPN school, but have absolutely no recollection of most of RN school or my Ed program. Heck, I remember more details of that day than I remember from the day Mercury's dad and I were married, so it definitely had to be one of my largest developmental milestones, in a way.
    It was a hospital-based program. We had picked up our books and uniforms the previous week.

    It was July 5, 1989. Our first week wasn't a full week, for which I'm eternally grateful. We had our first uniform inspection, but no one received points for dress code violations " as a gift." We toured the hospital, went over program rules for everything under the sun, received the syllabus, etc. we had been given a packet of abbreviations and symbols to memorize, including apothecary measurements like grains and drams. ("Double bounce to the ounce!" [emoji6]). However, those activities were not particularly meaningful and most likely hitch-hiked their way into my long term memory along with this one (paraphrased, of course. My memory is good, but not THAT good):

    "This door, right here, leads to the hospital. That door, over there, leads to the parking lot. When you pass through this door, your number one focus becomes your patient. When you pass through that door, every detail that you have learned about your patient's life, public and private, does not follow you. Many of you may believe that we live in a homogenous community. We don't. You will encounter people of all shapes and sizes, young and old, rich and poor, well-educated and illiterate. You will encounter people of all cultures, races, belief systems, sexual orientations, and health status. You will be seeing them at their worst; they will be uncomfortable, angry, frustrated, impatient, overcome with grief, or perhaps in denial about what they're experiencing. It is your job to provide all of them with the same, high-quality, competent care. If you are unable to do so for any reason, you now know which door you should be using."

    Yup. That's when everything "clicked" for me.

  • Mar 27

    There's a difference between "learning" and "being taught." One requires you to depend on yourself, and the other requires you to depend on other people. Are you prepared to spend the rest of your life looking for dependable people?

    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from poor judgement.

    And the classic Dr. Seuss quote:
    "Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind."

    Aaaaaand, just because I'm a Mom to 17 and 18 year old kids...

    "Who owns the problem?"

    And...

    "You knew the rules before you broke them. Go ahead and get mad at me. I'm your Mom, not your friend. I have plenty of grown-up friends, I don't need any teenage friends."

    My Mom is looking down at me, watching her words come out of my mouth, and is definitely laughing her butt off! [emoji33]

  • Mar 23

    There's a difference between "learning" and "being taught." One requires you to depend on yourself, and the other requires you to depend on other people. Are you prepared to spend the rest of your life looking for dependable people?

    Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from poor judgement.

    And the classic Dr. Seuss quote:
    "Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind."

    Aaaaaand, just because I'm a Mom to 17 and 18 year old kids...

    "Who owns the problem?"

    And...

    "You knew the rules before you broke them. Go ahead and get mad at me. I'm your Mom, not your friend. I have plenty of grown-up friends, I don't need any teenage friends."

    My Mom is looking down at me, watching her words come out of my mouth, and is definitely laughing her butt off! [emoji33]


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