Latest Comments by luv4nurses

luv4nurses 726 Views

Joined Nov 4, '04 - from 'Michigan'. luv4nurses is a Nursing Supervisor. She has '25' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med/Surg;Geriatrics;Ortho;Family Med'. Posts: 11 (27% Liked) Likes: 9

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    What astounds me is that once again, an LPN is lambasted for her choice. I have been in nursing for almost 26 years in January and the way nurses, LPN vs RN, compete and talk down to one another is deplorable! What if the doctors started a smear campaign against RNs saying they weren't smart enough to become doctors so they settled at being an RN? Why can't we just agree that there are different skill sets that provide a positive outcome for the patient because, after all, that's who we are there for. Most of the rants on this post is nothing but folks trying to one up one another and piss on another's pride at what they do. I have no clue who the OP is but it really made me smile reading that someone is happy with where they started and love what they do.

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    In MI you can work as a school nurse and even take a a small certification course and become a Health Education teacher.

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    Last I checked, in MI LPNs get paid an average of 20/hr to start. My good friend, who has 20+ years makes about 29.50/hr.

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    Fiona59 likes this.

    The only thing I can say is that "stupid" nurses are everywhere. But it just seems that a great deal of them are uncovered in LTACs. I worked in an LTAC and upon arriving for my shift, made my rounds as usual. The CNA who normally took care of a particular patient said that she was having difficulty turning and changing the patient. The patient could normally assist a bit but was moaning and guarding her left hip. Now mind you, I was working the 11-7pm shift. I immediately called for a stat xray, noted that the patient was getting pain medication that she normally did not receive and apparently was not getting relief. Well upon receiving the xray results, it was found she had a fractured hip. Now comes more "stupidity". The DON asked me why did I order a stat xray?! I was like well, umm, her clinical signs. I shook my head and then said, did you ask the other 2 shifts why they did absolutely nothing? Unbelievable...

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    HazelLPN, RNTOBE_1970, Start2, and 1 other like this.

    After reading a great portion of the posts, I am clear on one thing. There is a big difference in the training of LPNs from state to state. When I started out as an LPN back in 1989, we were in a year 'round program, five days per week, eight and a half hours a day (half hour for lunch). I had to be in school from 7am-330pm. The only break I had was 1 week during Christmas. It was EXTREMELY thorough, believe me when I say that! We had to maintain a percentage of 85% to even stay in the program. After moving from the foundation segment, we went on to do clinicals 4 days a week, with rotations in OB, psych, med/surg and even clinic nursing. To this date, I do not know of any nursing program that intensive! The attrition rate was staggering, more than half did not make it. After graduation, I went on to work in hospitals, homecare, hospice, LTC, etc. I precepted RNs who did not know nearly as much as I. Several people mention critical thinking. It is ascinine to even say an LPN does not have critical thinking skills. ALL nurses are taught to evaluate signs and symptoms, review labs, assess the patient and review orders and medications leading up to a change in status. My LPN schooling surpassed my clinical training as an RN. Duh, if you have good clinical skills it should stand to reason that you have critical thinking in order to utilize the clinical signs before you. I would never knock another nurse because they are all my brothers and sisters. The only difference, and this is speaking from the point of view as an LPN to RN with many years of experience, is one thing, respect. I always made darned good money as an LPN, heck, I made more than many RNs. But for some reason, people see the letters RN and it makes a world of difference, to them. BTW, I went to LPN school in Detroit under the JTPA program which was phased out for some reason. But, I will say this, if someone wanted my opinion I would tell them to go to RN school. It makes no sense to go to school for 2 years to be an LPN when you can be an RN, they do not have programs around like the one I graduated from. But Lord have mercy, if I saw ANY nurse graduate in 6 months time, I would be VERY skeptical. I feel one year should be the MINIMUM for an LPN.

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    This story made me tear up, thank you so much for sharing. This story should remind us all of why we are nurses!

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    This has happened at my facility recently. A patient who was expected to be discharged endined up aspirating because the nurse administered the tube feeding in a flat position. The facility covered it up but I have been so disturbed by this because the family was expecting him to come home and I can't help feeling bad knowing the pain they must feel losing their dad while the nurse who caused this is walking around scott free. This case is open and shut because it is considered negligent homicide because of her "mistake". The family is left in mourning while she is still earning a "living".

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    Yes, I applied for the open positions and I was hired as a full time status NOT a floater or pool nurse.

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    I am in a situation and I would like advice on what to do. I have been a nurse for 16 years and have never had to deal with this sensitive issue. I have been at a facility for over a year now and have had no disciplinary or attendance problems. I have had many praises from co-workers, patients and their families alike. The reason I am stating these things will unfold shortly. Also, this is a non unionized facility and they pride themselves on this. I am a full time nurse and have been so since starting there.I always go to the floor where I am assigned without any trouble. 95% of the nurses who are full time have permanent units. I asked if I could have a permanent unit so as to have better continuity of patient car but was quickly told by the DON that no one has a permanent unit. Of course being new at the time of inquiry (4 months) I relented. Shortly thereafter a new nurse was hired and I found out that they were assigned a permanent unit. When asked I was told they are a 12 hr nurse and that unit utilizes 12 hr nurses, preferably. Well soon thereafter an 8 hr nurse was hired and given a permanent spot and within the last 3 weeks another nurse has been hired and given a permanent spot while I float. The common denominator in all this is that all the nurses are white and I am black. I absolutely HATE thinking that this is the case but there have been rumors of the subtle racism, which I tried to dismiss and give the management a chance but it is becoming more overt and I would like to know anyone's opinion. The last nurse who brought this issue up was promptly labeled a troublemaker and left because thay started to do things making it hard for her. Am I wrong or am I making something from nothing. It appears that no permanent units apply only only to me while the white nurses are given permanent units. Should I be quiet or should I stand firm and get an answer as to what is going on?

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    I have been a nurse for sixteen years and of my four children, two of them were conceived while working the third shift ( one on the 7p-7a shift and the other 11p-7a shift). Now, working this shift came eeasily for me since at the time of the second "midnight" shift pregnancy I had been working 9 years on that schedule. It was easy for me because my eating schedule was adjusted to that of a person working days or afternoons. The body does nt know the time of day just that it needs to be well rested and fed accordingly, increase that if you are pregnant. If the shift is new to you, you might want to reconsider and change shifts if at all possible. But if this is a shift that you have been working for at least a year, you should do fine. An aside, one of my pregnancies was pre-term and the other one was almost an inducement (guess she wasn't a morning person). :spin:

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    Well I finally feel young at 35 years old. Have been in nursing for fourteen years and would not change one moment of it.



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