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RunnerRN2015, ASN 15,065 Views

Joined Jul 6, '11 - from 'NC, US'. RunnerRN2015 is a ER nurse. Posts: 817 (36% Liked) Likes: 750

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  • 7:23 am

    Sometimes I don't question nurses when they call a code blue when it actually isn't because it gets people there a lot faster than a rapid and you get a doc there stat.

    However, if they had a radial pulse it means they were stable-ish and had a systolic BP above 80. You are right though you should have checked a carotid or femoral. Was the pt still seizing when you checked it? IMO very inappropriate to start CPR.

  • 7:21 am

    What type of facility is this? In my facility (acute care hospital), we don't call a code for seizures. Do you have a Rapid Response Team? They may be needed in certain situations when a patient is having a seizure.

    Can I ask why you started chest compressions?

  • Nov 9

    "Oh I am flattered, but I'm afraid I can't mix business and pleasure."

    or something like that.

    Even a simple, "That's sweet, but no thank you."

  • Nov 7

    To the small hospital that offered a position: "I will be forever appreciative of the offer you have extended to me. However, I have decided to pursue another opportunity. Thank you for your time and consideration."

    To the facilities where interviews are scheduled: "I have already accepted another offer of employment and, therefore, need to cancel the pending interview. Nevertheless, I appreciate your time and consideration."

  • Oct 31

    Speaking as a rapid response nurse you did the right thing. Repeat: YOU DID THE RIGHT THING!! Your manager was wrong. Do not ever be afraid to call a rapid response or a CAT if you feel your patient needs it. Rapid Response nurses want to be called, and not needed rather than needed and not called.

  • Oct 31

    Yeah, it's time to bounce. Even if the patient was stable, there's no need to beat you up about calling a rapid response. It's so counterproductive.

  • Oct 31

    Quote from jack1971
    I appreciate your comment. In my 40+ years I have never been called names like, "special snowflake" or "buttercup." I'm actually laughing. Yes, I did start this post. But I guess what I don't understand is the fact that if floor nursing is not for a nurse, then why is there something wrong with that nurse?? My posting was not asking to be ridiculed for any anxiety I may have toward taking care of 5-8 patients at a time. The posting was simply asking for any advice toward jobs that are available besides bedside nursing for inexperienced new nurses. Please re-read the title.

    You've really never told someone to "suck it up buttercup" in all of your 40+ years? That's what people with perseverance do anyways.

    I'm not sure if this is just another post where a person went all the way through nursing school with rose colored glasses on or not but nursing is hard...no matter what field is chosen or tried.

    I dont think "floor nursing" is the issue here.

    Why do you think dialysis or correctional nursing will be any less hard or stressful? That's diminishing to the nurses that work their tails off and and do these jobs justice (and their patients for that matter). I'm sure it took them more than a couple of months to get even remotely good or comfortable in their skills. You're missing the point.

    I suggest you go back and read your post...what was written beyond the title.

  • Oct 31

    Quote from jack1971
    Thank you for your comment, but please be careful who you advise to get "treatment" unless you know their whole story. The last thing I wanted to do was get into controversy over an internet post, but I take that remark VERY offensive. Not everyone is the same and just because one does not have a "personality" to be a floor nurse is certainly not a reason for psychiatric treatment, assuming that is the type of "treatment" you are referring to.
    Oh lord How do you expect to be able to handle any type of nursing?

    Libby1987 made a salient point.

    Please don't react like a "special snowflake" and not take any self responsibility for your own rash decisions and emotions. Just talking to a professional may ease your anxiety and help you to realize goals that are both attainable and realistic.

    Reaching out for help may have prevented you from quitting. Reaching out for help as a nurse can help prevent you from killing someone too!

    You may need to do some soul searching and google accountablity.

    And please remember that this is the internet that you started a post on, it's not gonna be all rainbows and sunshine responses, plus it's like getting free therapy...whether you like it or not buttercup.

  • Sep 29

    First off; what is a "universal" language? Doesn't that depend on where you are?

    Second: perhaps they are talking about something that has NOTHING to do with you. I do have to wonder why you are so concerned about their conversations. Do you believe that you should be privy to everyones conversations? It's not rude, what is rude is eavesdropping. Unless they are directly addressing you, I don't think it's rude. Don't concern yourself with the affairs of others.

    And I do know that my facility has NOTHING about only speaking a "universal" language at the nurses station.

  • Sep 29

    Quote from Apples&Oranges
    This is kind of a joke on my unit, and the other nurses will call me in to address the "wipe my butt," "reach my soda," "change the channel" type requests:

    "You're not able to (insert basic personal care activity) yourself? Oh, no! (With concern) Who does this for you at home!?!?"

    (9/10 times met with a growl)

    "Oh, well this sure is a shame!" (Sugar sweet) " I guess I will have to talk to Case Management about placement. This sure is unfortunate, cause we were hoping you could go home soon! Oh, well, let me get some help, and then I'll talk to the social worker about a nursing home 'till you're able to take care of yourself."

    At this point, the COMPLETELY SELF SUFFICIENT, INDEPENDENT patient gets a look of absolute panic, and sputters "What! Nursing home! NO, I... what? I don't need that!

    At which I point out that "I understand, but our policy states that if you are unable to complete basic care activities like cleaning your own body, reaching your own food and drink or adjusting your own blankets, we can't send you home on your own. We'll have to have PT and OT reevaluate you and they will likely recommend a few weeks at a nursing home until you can relearn to do those things yourself."

    HALLELUJAH, GLORY BE, Miracle of Miracles....suddenly everyone's arms and legs suddenly decide to work!

    Gotta love the power of the loss of control :-(
    lol
    I work in inpatient rehab. We do this sometimes. I will ask " so what is your goal from here, a nursing home? Oh you plan on going home? Well you had better get up and do these things for yourself then hadn't you?"

  • Sep 29

    This is kind of a joke on my unit, and the other nurses will call me in to address the "wipe my butt," "reach my soda," "change the channel" type requests:

    "You're not able to (insert basic personal care activity) yourself? Oh, no! (With concern) Who does this for you at home!?!?"

    (9/10 times met with a growl)

    "Oh, well this sure is a shame!" (Sugar sweet) " I guess I will have to talk to Case Management about placement. This sure is unfortunate, cause we were hoping you could go home soon! Oh, well, let me get some help, and then I'll talk to the social worker about a nursing home 'till you're able to take care of yourself."

    At this point, the COMPLETELY SELF SUFFICIENT, INDEPENDENT patient gets a look of absolute panic, and sputters "What! Nursing home! NO, I... what? I don't need that!

    At which I point out that "I understand, but our policy states that if you are unable to complete basic care activities like cleaning your own body, reaching your own food and drink or adjusting your own blankets, we can't send you home on your own. We'll have to have PT and OT reevaluate you and they will likely recommend a few weeks at a nursing home until you can relearn to do those things yourself."

    HALLELUJAH, GLORY BE, Miracle of Miracles....suddenly everyone's arms and legs suddenly decide to work!

    Gotta love the power of the loss of control :-(

  • Sep 29

    The trick is to act like you think they are asking you to do something that they think they aren't allowed to do themselves.

    1. In a cheerful helpful voice say, "Oh, you can do that for yourself! That way you can set up the appointment at a time convenient to you!" <Big Smile>

    2. Again, "Oh, you can do that for yourself!" < Big Smile> (Assume that they don't know that they can call ahead for a refill. You are just teaching them and empowering them. ) Most pharmacies have refill phone lines and allow patients to request refills on the web.

    3. "Oh, I'm sure the state wouldn't let me request someone else's birth certificate. They are really concerned about identity theft now. " (You are just protecting them.)

    4. "Oh, you can do that for yourself! <Big Smile>. I'm sure your Dr will have questions about your ER visit that I wouldn't know."

    5. "Oh, you can do that for yourself! The trash can is right over there." (Assume that the patient is asking, because they don't know where the trash can is. You are being helpful.)

  • Sep 29

    I would rather call 911 for a panic attack than not call for something that ends up being life threatening. Diagnosing is beyond our scope of practice anyway. We need to stop beating ourselves up ( I have done it myself) for not 100% knowing something. At the end of the day, you advocated for the safety of the students in your care and that is a job well done.

  • Sep 25

    As a black nurse in a very white state, I've dealt with this more than once. During my tour of Nursing Home Hell, two of my patients had notes in their charts and the nurses' station that said "Caucasian caregivers only." Oddly enough, one ended up with a Filipina nurse, and had no complaints.

    Honestly, it didn't bother me. They were old, they weren't going to change, and I wasn't going to make their bigotry my problem. If they don't want me, they can't have me.

  • Sep 25

    Quote from kiszi
    There is no harm in reconstituting a Protonix or other med at the bedside and giving it immediately. Changing syringes would serve no purpose.
    I can see the reasoning when a med is reconstituted for later use, but even so, such a syringe should have an appropriate label added regardless. Why would it matter if it was a "normal saline" syringe or a plain one, if it was labeled?I
    Meds mixed in a normal saline bag are kept in the original fluid bag, no?
    Exactly, they SHOULD be labeled. The discouragement of using pre-filled syringes is because that when somebody inevitably fails to label as they should, hopefully nobody will think "oh this is just saline".


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