Content That RunnerRN2015 Likes

Content That RunnerRN2015 Likes

RunnerRN2015, ASN 13,760 Views

Joined Jul 6, '11 - from 'NC, US'. RunnerRN2015 is a ER nurse. Posts: 789 (35% Liked) Likes: 692

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  • Jul 20

    Going to try not to post too many details here, but the crux is this: the team responded to a crash call in the adult ICU for what they told us was a stillbirth. Half an hour later, we walked out of there with an intubated, Curosurfed, and very much alive 26 weeker. Especially when our unit is sort of sniffed at by adults and PICU as not a real ICU, it felt pretty darn good to show them what we're all about.

  • Jul 19

    I do not want to be a debbie downer but it sounds that you would be close to 60 by the time you are done. It is not easy to find a job for new grads and your age will be a disadvantage. Also, think about the money - will you have to take out a loan? What is your expectation for working as a nurse?
    I know somebody who went to get a masters in nursing when she was in her 50s but she was already a nurse for decades. You would be a brand new nurse.
    What is it that draws you back to school?
    My honest feedback is that I have a hard time to imagine you being successful but perhaps I am wrong.

  • Jul 18

    Not unusual. If you find one with good staffing, support, and reasonable ratios, climb in and hang on for dear life!

  • Jul 18

    I don't see the problem with giving formula. The baby is formula fed. My hospital gives out formula all the time.

    The problem I see is with the discharge plan. If the parents showed up 10 hours late to pick up their baby, the discharge should have been delayed. Social Work should be involved from the get-go with teenage parents. Did these parents ever do a 24 hr stay where they were responsible for the baby's care? That is a requirement for first time discharges of babies who've been hospitalized since birth in my area. Presumably the baby has Medicaid. Does Medicaid in your state not offer transportation? In my state it does. If it doesn't, Social Work should have been able to provide cab vouchers for the parents to come to the hospital more frequently. If such resources were provided and the parents didn't utilize them or used these cab vouchers to go elsewhere, I'd say we're getting into child protection territory...

  • Jul 18

    Our hospital is baby friendly in Postpartum only, not NICU. We give out formula all the time. Many times new parents do not have time on day of discharge to prepare at home. This buys them time to get settled. I'd be more concerned to discharging to parents that do not seem capable to care for their infant. I would make sure social work follows up.

  • Jul 18

    I don't see anything wrong with what you did about the formula, although we probably would've delayed the DC until the next day instead of doing it in the middle of the night (but that's our hospital).

  • Jul 18

    A mistake to provide food for a baby?? What could be more "baby friendly?"

  • Jul 18

    Quote from springchick1
    My question is what kind of nursing school and clinical sites did you attend where you don't know how to do this??
    The OP may very well know how to do this and doesn't realize it. Is it possible he/she learned it as different terminology? Not all clinical rotations give the same opportunities. I actually had very little exposure to IV's in general during my clinicals. Just the luck of the draw on the days I was there. Does that mean I went to an inferior school or am an inferior nurse? Yes, the OP should ask at work, but who knows, maybe he or she has been belittled for asking questions at work and is now feeling intimidated.

  • Jul 16

    I think formally letting them know is the most professional and classy way to do it. Wasting some staffing person's time (while they're calling you to look for coverage) if you have already decided to "auto-terminate" is not cool.

  • Jul 16

    Unless you had an EKG, and IV, and a pediatric crash cart with emergency medication and defibrilator, you couldn't have done more.

  • Jul 16

    ((((Hugs)))) Your efforts did not fail him -- he was gone. I know you know that, but want you to "hear" it from an unbiased 3rd party.

    I agree with the other posters that you should leave the family alone at this point. The grandma has your contact info, so if they want to take the initiative, they can. They may not want to, which is their right. They may feel that would be reliving their trauma.

    Underlying condition or no, this boy was gone. You kept circulation going, which was what he needed, but remember neither EMS nor the ED staff could save him either. There was nothing you could have done.

  • Jul 16

    Oh no! What a horrible thing for all parties to be involved with! I'm so sorry to hear you had to go through this.

    I am going to make one slight edit to your title. "A 10 year old boy died, and your CPR didn't reverse that."

    If he needed CPR he had died. Unfortunately, our resuscitation techniques aren't perfect.

  • Jul 13

    I WISH we did this. I would like to add that in addition to mock codes...THOROUGHLY going over each role would be beneficial. I noticed most nurses are afraid to admit they don't know how to connect and operate a defibrillator, chart, push meds...etc.

  • Jul 12
  • Jul 11

    I have come to believe the best "luxury" on which to spend money is experiences, not things. If I am going to overspend this is where it will go. Life is short. That and I refuse to compare myself to others. IF they have luxury items, good for them. None of my business.


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