Latest Comments by Palliative Care, DNP

Palliative Care, DNP 13,400 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Palliative Care, DNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 755 (55% Liked) Likes: 1,865

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  • 1
    jayjaybsnrn likes this.

    It absolutely is! I speak from experience. I had both the AANP & ANCC scheduled to hedge my bets. I failed the AANP and was devastated. I have 4 kids and this was a set back. I gathered myself and passed the ANCC. Then went back and passed the AANP the second time because I refused to be bested by it. You will pass. We put so much pressure on ourselves and inadvertently set ourselves up. Good Luck!

  • 8
    shibaowner, Stepney, driver461, and 5 others like this.

    As another DNP, I will agree that NP education needs streamlining. There are quality online programs and there are some that never even check on students. My program had faculty members evaluating each student onsite every semester. Like everything else in this world a student gets out what they are willing to put into a program. I know physicians MD and DO that I would not want to be seen by. I also know PAs and NPs that you couldn't pay me to see. Quality providers come in every type MD, DO, NP, and PA. Instead of comparing maybe become part of the solution and push for changes.

  • 4
    Serhilda, LadyT618, jayjaybsnrn, and 1 other like this.

    It is ok for the kids to see you cry as long as they also see you pick yourself up and keep trying. Children need to know that it is ok to work really hard but come up short. It happens but it is how you deal with it that makes the difference. They will learn resilience from watching you work to pass the next time. Yes, it stinks to have to have life on hold and retest but life does not end.

  • 0

    I did check local schools. VCU is the only one within a 2 hour radius. Thank you for the thought though.

  • 0

    I am looking at post master's psych certificate programs. I'm focusing on programs that match students with preceptors. So far, I have Vanderbilt, Johns Hopkins, and VCU. Googling has proven more often than not the student is on their own. I am not going through that again especially in a specialty such as psych. Does anyone know of any other programs they can recommend? Thank you for your assistance.

  • 0

    I am looking at post master's psych certificate programs. I'm focusing on programs that match students with preceptors. So far, I have Vanderbilt, Johns Hopkins, and VCU. Googling has proven more often than not the student is on their own. I am not going through that again especially in a specialty such as psych. Does anyone know of any other programs they can recommend? Thank you for your assistance.

  • 2

    I absolutely despised floor nursing. I went back to graduate school. I would say 90% of the time I enjoy my new role as a NP in the hospital. Life is too short to be miserable. Make a change for your own mental health. Try case management, an insurance company, Infection control, or whatever else. There are options other than floor nursing or returning to school if those are not for you.

  • 0

    Our hospital system has providers lounges at the hospitals so MD/DO/PA/NPs all have access. That said some hospitals have better offerings than others. Mine has the equivalent of gas station sandwiches, cookies, sodas, bottled water, coffee. Another one I cover has buffet lunches. My hospital board does not have one NP nor PA member.

  • 3

    I think you should go to loyno.edu and read over what is necessary for entry.

  • 7

    I attended Loyola University New Orleans. Most of it was online but we had dates to be on campus every year. I even completed some of my clinical hours in Louisiana. Every semester a faculty member visited each student on the clinical site and evaluated us. I feel that I had the best of both worlds. Honestly, no education can fully prepare you to transition from RN to NP. There is a learning curve and you feel like you are doggie paddling for the first year I am told. I am four months into my first job as an NP. I am constantly learning and asking questions. Best advice is to KNOW what you DO NOT KNOW. New providers that don't ask questions or look anything up are scary.

  • 1
    SopranoKris likes this.

    Johns Hopkins has a psych program. Very reputable and just $1509/credit.

  • 1
    justjamesthenurse likes this.

    You pretty much summed up my job daily. Palliative Care provides support, pain/symptom management, and care coordination. We take all the specialty pieces and put that into the big picture for the family. It can be overwhelming with specialists all coming in but only handling their organ (puzzle piece). The challenge is getting the physicians to consult us so we can help from step one. We are not Hospice although we definitely do refer to them.

  • 3

    After years of yo yoing with my weight, I had gastric bypass. It has been an excellent choice for me. I'm down 100 lbs and it will be a year in May. It's the little things that have made me notice how much weight affected daily life. I take the steps constantly at the hospital now. I was able to keep up with a group of 8th graders in D.C. I can finally shop in the regular section. I no longer take several medications. Mostly just various vitamins. I know surgery isn't for everyone but it was a great choice for me.

  • 1
    localgirl85 likes this.

    I attended Loyola University New Orleans. It is online but you do have to go to campus some. They give you the dates. Every semester a faculty member literally evaluates you on the clinical site. I was a difficult program but achievable. Not without issues but then every school has some.

  • 5
    brownbook, NRSKarenRN, Jules A, and 2 others like this.

    Just a typical day for me. I hear this multiple times a day. It doesn't necessarily mean the family is in denial. It does mean they aren't ready for the discussion. Forcing the discussion only makes them stop listening. Meet them where they are. Listen. Be empathetic. Families will start asking questions when there is a change or when they are ready. As mentioned above, most folks think we are the Reaper. Palliative does not mean no Care nor Hospice. We also manage chronic illnesses such as MS, ALS, & Sickle Cell etc.


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