Latest Comments by Palliative Care, DNP

Palliative Care, DNP 14,534 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Palliative Care, DNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 763 (55% Liked) Likes: 1,890

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  • 0

    I was reading an article that said OK, GA, MO, AR, SC, & WV still do not allow NPs to write schedule II prescriptions. Just curious how Hospice & Palliative Care NPs do their jobs in those states? Almost every patient I see requires a schedule II. Just wow

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    WHNP/FNP gives you more options. CNM still relegates you to only women's health.

  • 1
    mnera09 likes this.

    The job market in our area is limited for women's health. I would definitely say the dual program would give you more options. The Hampton Roads area is saturated with NPs. A dual certification is make you stand out. If you end up in a rural area like the Eastern Shore you will be doing women's health in primary care.

  • 1
    nuangel1 likes this.

    Honestly, I agree there is a lot of BS in the BSN education. I also felt like there was a lot of BS in the DNP. That said, I put in the work because it was necessary to get where I wanted to go. In life, there are so many things we do simply because they are necessary. The value is determined by you. Are you where you want to be? If not put in the work.

  • 0

    Completely depends on the program you choose to attend....Look up programs you are interested in and then tuition/fees.

  • 17
    Ryn RN, ambr46, Serhilda, and 14 others like this.

    I would like to tell you that this is only an issue with RNs. Unfortunately, during my orientation as a new NP most of the NPs & MDs training me never utilized a stethoscope. However, all charted physical assessments. I was absolutely astonished.

  • 0

    Goals of Care conversations are part of my daily routine. Patients typically do not understand that DNR does not mean we stop treating the illness. I typically advise them that all measures continue unless/until their heart were to stop. I describe what a CODE would be like for someone in their condition. We have CPR pamphlets with statistics advising the odds of CPR being successful. We always address Advanced Care Plans (ACP) as it is imperative to appoint someone to make decisions should you be unable to do so. Not every patient wants to appoint their spouse as he/she may struggle to make choices the patient would want. Most patients are grateful to have had all of the facts and information given to them to make the best decisions in regards to their care. Many hospitalists that I work with struggle with these conversations and often leave patients confused.

  • 0

    My manager is not a bad person. I truly believe that. He simply has zero managerial skills. He is unable to solve issues, deflects if there is one person that doesn't agree, turns every situation around to the employee that questions anything, constantly provides positive feedback, and is a complete company yes man. In regards to feedback, I mean that he constantly blows smoke praising that amazing job everyone is doing. No one can grow without real time honest feed back. Should you approach him with concerns, he will then turn that around blaming the employee with insecurity or lack of confidence. He simply can not trouble shoot or problem solve. But he came to us from Cedar Sinai so we are supposed to be completely in awe and thankful. Well he wasn't in management at Cedars. He was merely a physician. It is the elephant in the room constantly. As long as you are the employee that goes along and questions nothing then you are fine. That doesn't leave room to improve the work environment. He is polite and nice to employees but everyone feels like he is useless to the point we all try to dodge him.

  • 2
    RN_10 and jayjaybsnrn like this.

    It absolutely is! I speak from experience. I had both the AANP & ANCC scheduled to hedge my bets. I failed the AANP and was devastated. I have 4 kids and this was a set back. I gathered myself and passed the ANCC. Then went back and passed the AANP the second time because I refused to be bested by it. You will pass. We put so much pressure on ourselves and inadvertently set ourselves up. Good Luck!

  • 8

    As another DNP, I will agree that NP education needs streamlining. There are quality online programs and there are some that never even check on students. My program had faculty members evaluating each student onsite every semester. Like everything else in this world a student gets out what they are willing to put into a program. I know physicians MD and DO that I would not want to be seen by. I also know PAs and NPs that you couldn't pay me to see. Quality providers come in every type MD, DO, NP, and PA. Instead of comparing maybe become part of the solution and push for changes.

  • 4
    Serhilda, LadyT618, jayjaybsnrn, and 1 other like this.

    It is ok for the kids to see you cry as long as they also see you pick yourself up and keep trying. Children need to know that it is ok to work really hard but come up short. It happens but it is how you deal with it that makes the difference. They will learn resilience from watching you work to pass the next time. Yes, it stinks to have to have life on hold and retest but life does not end.

  • 0

    I did check local schools. VCU is the only one within a 2 hour radius. Thank you for the thought though.

  • 0

    I am looking at post master's psych certificate programs. I'm focusing on programs that match students with preceptors. So far, I have Vanderbilt, Johns Hopkins, and VCU. Googling has proven more often than not the student is on their own. I am not going through that again especially in a specialty such as psych. Does anyone know of any other programs they can recommend? Thank you for your assistance.

  • 0

    I am looking at post master's psych certificate programs. I'm focusing on programs that match students with preceptors. So far, I have Vanderbilt, Johns Hopkins, and VCU. Googling has proven more often than not the student is on their own. I am not going through that again especially in a specialty such as psych. Does anyone know of any other programs they can recommend? Thank you for your assistance.

  • 2

    I absolutely despised floor nursing. I went back to graduate school. I would say 90% of the time I enjoy my new role as a NP in the hospital. Life is too short to be miserable. Make a change for your own mental health. Try case management, an insurance company, Infection control, or whatever else. There are options other than floor nursing or returning to school if those are not for you.


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