Latest Comments by gorideaquad

gorideaquad 1,175 Views

Joined May 2, '11. Posts: 40 (13% Liked) Likes: 5

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    I have been working for 4 months at an LTC swapping from the Alzheimer's unit to the long term unit to the hospital rehab floor which is where i work on most nights. Most of the patients I tend to come from the hospital I am interviewing with .

    I am wondering does anyone here work as a neuro step down CNA at a hospital??'
    I went for an interview at the same hospital for the orthopedics wing and never did get the job after 3 interviews but I think it is because I was fresh out of school.

    Now that I have 4 months CNA work experience, I know for a fact that an LTC facility like the one I work for is not for me. It is many things and none that I like. Understaffed (one person for a 22 rehab hall, 2 if the other gal shows up), dirty, dangerous, moldy and the morale is very very low. I get paid $10.25 right now and the hospital is only 50 cents more however it is only 3 twelves rathe than 5 eight hour shifts. Also I am going back to school to finish my Bachelor's degree for teaching so this schedule would be way better


    ANY GOOD ADVICE, I AM INTERVIEWING WITH THE UNIT MANAGER> I NEED a way not to come off as having negative feelings for where I work. Is it all right to admit that LTC is not for me or not? I just feel I was too "green" for the other position I had applied for 4 months ago there.

    Please give me any good advice for tomorrow
    thannks sophie

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    OK SO I WORK AT a LTC . ONly there for a month. Certified a month. Learned a lot there. Don't enjoy the setting the one CNA per 30 residents the hundreds poopy briefs each shift. Just a regular nursing home but the pace is wearing me out rapidly and breaking my back due to the old school cranks beds. There is some great staff there and great learning opportunities.

    Anyhow I got the interview I really really wanted with the local hospital. I passed the interview with the HR lady just fine. Boy it was super long about and hour, I did not put my foot in my mouth. She seemed to like me and what I could bring to the company. She understood nursing homes were not a fit for all CNA's

    To continue my short story, last night I did my "shadow" with another CNA at the hospital for several hours. He was cool, leaving to be a fire fighter. Real informative and seemed to think I fit in. Met several other co workers who also said I fit right in, easy going, mature, hard worker. Some CNA's just thought I was filling in for another one that was off that day!

    Anyways my question to you all is : have YOU EVER DONE A PEER INTERVIEW? ARE YOU REALLY NOT HIRED UNTIL YOU PASS THIS STAGE OF THE INTERVIEW OR IS THAT JUST SOMETHING THEY SAY IN HR?

    The reasoning the other CNA"s told me they do this is cause no one person should make the decision to hire an employee. There are scenarios played out and you are asked :"what if you were in this situation what would you do" and so on. They said it really is not bad, just don't come off as a know it all and snooty.

    Any good advice? I really really want this position. plus it's $10.75 instead of $10.25 and all people are weight bearing, mostly vitals and simple bathroom trips. Please advise

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    Little Miss Coffee likes this.

    My advice is do way more listening than talking. Listen listen listen. And don't come off as rude. Just be yourself and learn what you can from the people that have been there. Don't say "in school they taught it like this" etc that is annoying. I have only been on my job two weeks at an LTC in the dementia unit and I like most of my co workers. BUT don't excpect to click with everyone, just learn what you can and be respectful.
    Don't gossip at break time. Lot of that going on at my work. I never talk about my personal life at all and never about others

    Other than that, have a good attitude, be on time and just relax, you will do just fine. Everyone was new once, that's what I tell my co workers and they smiles and say "yeah isn't that the truth". That one little sentence brings barriers down because they think back to their first day, week, month.

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    Quote from klynn81
    I wrote my last exam today for the 5 month Health Care Aide program I've been taking. Next week we find out where we are being sent for clinicals (3 weeks at hospital/3 weeks at long term care facility) and I'm pretty excited. I'll be finished June 30th and I can't wait to get out there and start working again, and make some money!! ----> lucky for us they just raised the pay AGAIN so now the starting wage is $17.39. Yes Please!!

    Ok so enough rambling....the whole point of my post is to hear from others if you've worked as a CNA or know anyone who has while pregnant? The husband and I are going to start trying to start a family in August (we've been waiting a looooong time and I'm not putting it off for anything else) provided I've got a job which I don't think will be a problem.

    Just wondering......

    How does a person get through the day if they are experiencing nausea and sickness?
    Can you still lift, transfer, etc.?
    When the belly really starts to get big is that gonna be really hard to be on the feet all day long?
    oh i forgot you will be making $17 as a CNA? where abouts
    Anyways I did not mean to scare you but for myself I had 10 lb babies LOL so maybe this is why I would never think of working while pregnant.

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    Quote from klynn81
    I wrote my last exam today for the 5 month Health Care Aide program I've been taking. Next week we find out where we are being sent for clinicals (3 weeks at hospital/3 weeks at long term care facility) and I'm pretty excited. I'll be finished June 30th and I can't wait to get out there and start working again, and make some money!! ----> lucky for us they just raised the pay AGAIN so now the starting wage is $17.39. Yes Please!!

    Ok so enough rambling....the whole point of my post is to hear from others if you've worked as a CNA or know anyone who has while pregnant? The husband and I are going to start trying to start a family in August (we've been waiting a looooong time and I'm not putting it off for anything else) provided I've got a job which I don't think will be a problem.

    Just wondering......

    How does a person get through the day if they are experiencing nausea and sickness?
    Can you still lift, transfer, etc.?
    When the belly really starts to get big is that gonna be really hard to be on the feet all day long?
    I DO NOT RECOMMEND it at all. First, it is all grunt work, wiping bottoms, messes and such. The most important thing is you will be exposed and your fetus to many things you wnat to be nowhere around while pregnant. That being said where I work there are many pregnant CNA"s but it's like being a man down and not fair to the pregnant CNA or the rest of the work crew.

    I would say no please don't work and be a CNA for your safety and your fetus' as well

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    fuzzy I did what you said and it went off without a hitch I was done at 6 am!. But I have to say that it was just me and not me and another orientee. Some people say it's easier to work alone at my facility. That is true until you need to lift a resident. There is one resident I can't lift and one that uses a hoyer but he did not have to use the bathroom, I have not yet been trained on those. I heard you are really not suppose to operate those on your own. So I had 20 residents, 3 rounds, 5 get ups and did fine. The only boo boo I did was I got a brief on backwards on a get up LOL. It was also easier becuause this very needy resident was in the hopstial and the one that poops 7 times a night in her brief was given a sleeping pill LOL.

    But yeah it went way better, The only thing that got to me is the person who was supposed to train me was out for like the second day in a row (never met her) so it was just me

    The other two cna's are related and have this bad rep. Well let me tell you that they were great and asked me several times if I needed help, I did ask twice with residents I could not push over to change on my own. I answered some of their call lights and did not make a bib deal out of it, you give some you take some.

    Anyways I am much more hopeful now thanks again for the good advice

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    I will actually try this tonight and report on it tomorrow to see how it went. The residents always ask what time it is though LOL. I guess I can lie yeah it's 4:30 am not 3 am how would they know anyways as long as I leave them in their rooms. The nurse really does not want to see them earlier then necessary cause you know how they are all gathered around the nurses station and chat.

    Thanks again you are giving me hope I will probably have 30 people and 5 get ups minimum

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    one day. I actually started looking for work a month after i became certified. I applied at night online, that morning I was hired at a LTC. Not ideal but a job

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    interceptinglight likes this.

    dang man I guess i will have to get used to it
    Hey you know they say once you have done the hardest job, it can only get easier somewhere else right?
    There are CNA's that have been there 5 years and stick together and when you ask for help they don't come maybe they forget or who knows. I know for 56 people it will be 3 CNA's

    I am still not getting how I am supposed to do my last round at 4:30 am and get my get ups in time by 7am because I have to be out the door at 7 sharp for my kids.

    I will endure this facility for the experience and learn from it. But love it? no. I do love some of the residents already though, just not the ones that punch me and hit me LOL

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    Quote from interceptinglight
    The LTC facility I work in has a very good reputation and it's really not a terrible place to work (depending on who you ask)....but this very issue is the reason I will never work in such a facility ever again. There's no way an aide can give good quality care to as many residents as each one is assigned to on any given shift. Because you can't be there for everyone, we use alarms to 'babysit' the residents who are fall risks, hoping that the alarms will help you get to the resident in time to prevent a fall. Fine.....so what can you do when you hear an alarm going off and you are with someone you just put on the toilet who can't be left alone? You hope another aide will jump in and help. Many times that doesn't happen and the person still falls. A couple of months ago, we had a lady take her alarm off and get herself out of bed alone -- she fell and re-broke her hip, then died a few days later. It was during a busy morning while every aide was busy getting everyone else up, this lady got tired of waiting for help and tried to do it herself. These LTC facilities get away with this kind of horrendous **** because they try and staff as few people as they can possibly get away with.
    I feel as if there is no way I can give quality care to 20 plus residents being new. How can i get all the 5 people up and to the nurse's station and dressed and doing my last round at 4:30 am while changing sheets, briefs etc. Yes they use those wheelchair and bed alarms for the wanderers who have dementia as babysitters there as well. I am having the hardest time realizing I can't waste a second and while I have 2 call lights going and am doing my last rounds the other CNA sitting at the nurse's station or smoking her 15th smoke won't even think of helping the newbie

    I guess the facility looks clean and fancy but even the residents in the middle of the night will ask me " have you been very busy, is there just one of you" they know we are way understaffed for that hall. Anyways my plan is to start getting people up earlier than 4:30 am and dressed until I am used to it because I HAVE TO BE OUT the door at 7am sharp to be home for my husband to go to work on time (can't leave the kids alone).

    Anyways I guess this is how a lot of these places are run they probably only get so much from the state or insurance and another CNA on the hall giving good care would kill the budget.

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    ok so basically i started on the wing I will be working on. It was crazy busy. As a test, they put a new orientee (who was very good, male) with me. We had our own hall. did the charting, call lights, two rounds, emptied garbage and 5 morning get ups to the nurses station. We worked as a team Some of the residents are very heavy. Some don't talk and fight and hit hard. Some wet the whole bed. I think the previous shift did no rounds at all. We had one resident do 8 BM's and large ones plus she called 10 other times. Four other residents had BM's that came out of their briefs and onto the bed. Long story short, we got out at 7:20 which was good considering quitting time is 7. But I HAVE NO IDEA HOW I WILL EVEN DO THIS ON MY OWN. It was cool because there were two people and we could do stuff as a team. It is going to be very very hard to get people up and on time at the nurse's station unless I start before 4:30 am.
    I have no idea. Plus people just say stuff that is so sweet and others call you names and stuff.

    I mean I think I can do it easier. Just some of the men that can't move and dirty the whole bed with poop that is hard to deal with by myself

    Any advice

    Oh and the other two CNA's were cool but they are sisters in law that live together and basically just stick together the whole time

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    Drew thanks for the answer
    I just did my 2nd training day in rehab and will work the LTC wing. I have been told scary stories about the staff. Mostly scared of doing a 2 person lift if no one is willing to help.
    I want to be able to have a good attitude when I get there and forget what people gossiped about in the lunch room LOL

    Thanks again for your insight. i was told about rounds when I get there with the previous CNA. People told me to check beds for wetness, actually pull back the sheets. Check briefs. No people get up at night to pee or do they forget and use briefs? wondering.

    I know i am not going to get everything right at first but I will try my hardest to do the best job I can.

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    Quote from cmm4ever
    Darn it, I just typed the whole thing and it disappeared some how! I got home a little while ago from my first day. I dont know how I feel/think. Im sure everyone is unsure at first. I just hope I can get used to it. The girl I was training with today, was not necessarily a bad person (that I know of yet), but she was very loud, blunt etc., the opposite of me. She only did vitals once (even though I think others might more)? It was so chaotic, I cant even remember what we did and when. She touched the oxygen lines, etc...are you allowed to do that? She also stopped the feeds (really didnt see how she did it). It seemed like mostly everyone was pooing and peeing all over (also right after changing them/the bed). One guy even almost peed all over my new shoes. I think that the yucky stuff is what I am having a hard time dealing with now. I dont even know if I was making the beds right lol (especially not sure how to change bed with person in it). She charted some stuff a few hours later after she did it..honestly dont know how she remembered what to put/if she just made some stuff up. I feel nauseous now...I dont know if I just have to eat, plus its hot, and just maybe squeamish from today. Hoping it grows on me/ that I can get it down. (well I guess Ill never love the nasty stuuf but you know lol). How long of training did you get before you were on your own/how many patients at first. I honestly dont know how 1 person can do most of this work. I work tomorrow,Wednesday, and Friday..so we will see I guess.
    LOL your first day sounds just like mine LOL
    yeah i felt like throwing up as well and was hot as heck

    Stick it out and do your best PS I got peed on pooped on too. LOL

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    Missingyou likes this.

    thank you for all the responses. They have given me insight. I was told there are 3 CNA's on the night shift. Yes people did call in sick and the PRN's did show up when called. THe training nurse made a huge deal of calling in 4 hours or at best 8 hours before you know you can't come in.

    I will get a better feel for how things run at night. Also charting is done by hand not on a computer screen mounted to the wall like at other places so for a while after you finish your shift you chart. I mean Do people chart along as they go? I guess I will have to jot down in a notepad what i do cause I sure won't remember 7 hours later who did what. The other CNA's just told me to put what the other one did the day before in the charts, one CNA PRN just got tired of charting and after 45 minutes went home without charting the rest of her patients.

    I will stay at this facility and learn everything I can and do the best I can that's what I know

    Thanks again for all the responses


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