Content That sofla98 Likes

Content That sofla98 Likes

sofla98 1,540 Views

Joined May 1, '11. Posts: 67 (40% Liked) Likes: 85

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  • Jul 22 '15

    If you don't take it, you'll have no experience. Some is better than none. And for 30/hr, I wouldn't hesitate in any circumstance as a new grad.

  • Jul 22 '15

    Quote from BirkieGirl
    try agency nursing or a staffing corporation, like Kelly services. you work for THEM, so you don't have to interview with the hospitals. agency nursing is a great option because you get to choose where you want to go, when you want.
    Agency nursing isn't for new grads. It's intended for experienced nurses that can work on short notice with minimal orientation.

  • Dec 12 '14

    I can't believe this conversation. I am a float pool nurse and I do a full assessment including VS ( Bp and pulse) at the beginning of every shift. I do this before I give medications. I'm not sure what everyone is talking about but it takes 5 mins to do a full assessment. If they have a lot of lines, drips and drains a little longer but at that point you have fewer patients. I also reassess my patient by doing a focused assessment. Now I have to be honest I almost always leave 45mins to an hour after my shift. But I do drive home knowing that I gave the best care that I could and IF I missed something it was not due to my negligence. I'm saddened and a little embarrassed by this thread.

  • Dec 12 '14

    I pick up all shifts by email or text. I love my manager. Email or text is a legal document.

  • Dec 12 '14

    Last time I checked, forging someone else's signature is a convictable crime. Report it to the police and do not turn back. They can prove it is not you who signed the document by comparing handwriting and finger printing. Sociopaths will continue to target you if you do not hand over consequences. Take it from someone who has personal experience with one.

  • Dec 12 '14

    Wow, that's down and dirty!! I'm thankful I don't work eith anyone like her!! If your nurse manager didn't fire her already (which according to any HR rules/regs she SHOULD have), contact HR. I would not feel safe working with a psycho like that!

  • Dec 12 '14

    Quote from jadelpn
    And malpractice insurance. Get it if you do not have it. You never, ever know how many shades of whacked this person can become. About much more than the schedule.

    I, too, am utterly amazed at the wonderful nurses who run away in droves, who are let go in the most bizarre circumstances, who are "spoken to", written up, reprimanded about the most weirdest of the weird.....yet the out of control, blatantly outrageous, in one's face inappropriate, to almost illegal nurse is left to rack up the depravity--unscathed.

    In happening to be a party to a "reprimand" such as this (as an impartial advocate situation) the "now, now we all know 'how you are' Nurse Nutcase, so hee, hee, haw, haw stop scaring the other nurses and be good now!! HAHAHAHAHA!! Nurse Nutcase doesn't MEAN anything by it, it was a misunderstanding!! So go play nice and try and get along..." (as if the one who brings up these things somehow is also in the wrong----Uhm, there's only one nurse who can't seem to "get along") Cripes on a cracker by the end of these meetings that should be held in a circle on the floor criss/cross applesauce style, and have the quote of the day on a giant whiteboard-- I was ready to be handed out juice boxes, and be required to pinky swear we will try to be good. The ONLY thing that I wanted to take home from that was A) Can I bring my blankie, and B) Can we be required to have a nap time.

    When grown nurses (or people in any professional setting) act like preschool would be pushing their limitations of behavior, you have got to wonder what the heck management is thinking. Maybe that it reinforces the notion that as long as you stick to the script, who cares if you can actually be a professional? Just give the illusion that you are around the patients, please.
    Jade, you win the award for the most hilarious colloquialisms, euphemisms, idioms, and analogies in a single post. Booyah!

  • Dec 12 '14

    Quote from Been there,done that
    Hard to believe management and administration has not acted on these behaviors.
    Most facilities have a code of conduct in place that would have her out the door by now.

    Document, document, document and stay as far away from this psycho as possible.
    It's actually not hard to imagine at all, sadly.

  • Dec 12 '14

    Maybe she is sleeping with, related to, or threatening the bosses. Or being used by bosses to get peers in trouble.

    Not sure what I'd do, but would consider involving HR, Management, even police. She is very dangerous. How's her care of patients? doing drugs? being beaten up at home? How are her children (if any)? Abuse?

  • Dec 12 '14

    And malpractice insurance. Get it if you do not have it. You never, ever know how many shades of whacked this person can become. About much more than the schedule.

    I, too, am utterly amazed at the wonderful nurses who run away in droves, who are let go in the most bizarre circumstances, who are "spoken to", written up, reprimanded about the most weirdest of the weird.....yet the out of control, blatantly outrageous, in one's face inappropriate, to almost illegal nurse is left to rack up the depravity--unscathed.

    In happening to be a party to a "reprimand" such as this (as an impartial advocate situation) the "now, now we all know 'how you are' Nurse Nutcase, so hee, hee, haw, haw stop scaring the other nurses and be good now!! HAHAHAHAHA!! Nurse Nutcase doesn't MEAN anything by it, it was a misunderstanding!! So go play nice and try and get along..." (as if the one who brings up these things somehow is also in the wrong----Uhm, there's only one nurse who can't seem to "get along") Cripes on a cracker by the end of these meetings that should be held in a circle on the floor criss/cross applesauce style, and have the quote of the day on a giant whiteboard-- I was ready to be handed out juice boxes, and be required to pinky swear we will try to be good. The ONLY thing that I wanted to take home from that was A) Can I bring my blankie, and B) Can we be required to have a nap time.

    When grown nurses (or people in any professional setting) act like preschool would be pushing their limitations of behavior, you have got to wonder what the heck management is thinking. Maybe that it reinforces the notion that as long as you stick to the script, who cares if you can actually be a professional? Just give the illusion that you are around the patients, please.

  • Dec 12 '14

    Quote from Red Kryptonite
    Of course it's not, and my nurses do this regularly if they discover someone needs cleaned up while in the middle of their med pass. But what happens when the CNA has already had to interrupt her Q4 vitals run for a blowout cdiff brief and isn't going to be available for a while?

    *this comment inspired by real life events
    They will have to wait...

    A nurse can't stop in the middle of a med pass to change; they can't, especially if they discover a skin tear, a pt is symptomatic of a CVA and needs to be sent out, and the incident report needs to filled out along with statements from the CNAs, along with a change in condition needs to be completed and a transfer form and information attached to it, along with calling the ambulance.

    I can do a CNA job all day long (BTDT), but CNAs CANT do MY job.

  • Dec 12 '14

    Since I hang out more in the General/Off-Topic section of this site (being silly), whenever I come across this particular thread, "Does It Ever Get Better?" I have to fight the urge to answer the thread's question with a terse "NO! NEVER, EVER, EVER!"
    ...But I reckon that would come across as being mean. I know OP was serious, and it is a serious subject of great concern to many. I am hoping by admitting my urge for mischief I can expel this idea from my mind.

    (I now return you to your regularly scheduled program!)

  • Dec 12 '14

    Quote from Techy214
    Some patient groups see you doing those things and then instantly lose any respect for you. Just because it's in the scope of nursing practice doesn't mean you have to enjoy everything. I would be worried if she didn't find it disgusting. She/he is just being honest.
    No-one expects a nurse to enjoy, for example, cleaning up diarrhea, but performing these activities with a good grace as nurses is part of caring for our patients. If a nurse cannot put themself in the place of a patient who is very sick, and has, for example, uncontrolled diarrhea, knowing that the patient (who is very often unable to assist themself, and who is forced to lay in their diarrhea until someone comes along to help them) is suffering because of their illness and because of the indignity and great discomfort that goes along with uncontrolled diarrhea, then that is a big problem as the nurse's attitude is not good for the patient. Patients pick up on the nurse's feelings of revulsion, and it does not help with their healing process. That is why it is necessary for a nurse to have the ability to feel compassion towards his/her patients. Patients want to feel cared for, and they value nurses who show caring towards them, who do not express revulsion or detachment when assisting them in these ways. When a nurse behaves as though he/she is personally offended by having to assist a patient who is incontinent, as happened to a family member of mine, it is very harmful for the patient and for their family as they register this immediately.

    I think that the OP's words that I quoted in my earlier post above may be a large part of the problem they are having with being a nurse: namely, that they do not really have the ability to feel caring towards their patients who cannot control their bodily functions, and feel burdened and offended by the care they are required to provide. If this is the case, I suggest seeking employment in another setting, where such intimate patient care is not required.

  • Dec 12 '14

    Quote from jsmythee
    I loved the work but hated how nasty some patients could get despite the disgusting things you did for them.
    I was surprised to read your words above. Did you really mean to say this? What disgusting things are you referring to? Do you mean actions that are within your scope of nursing practice? Are you referring to assisting patients with toileting, or taking care of patients who have diarrhea, or who are vomiting, or are incontinent? Or something else?

  • Dec 12 '14

    Quote from RNwithHonors
    The situation is this...
    My final semester ended in December. I was literally sought out by the Director of the acute-care floor where I did my preceptorship to start working as soon as I had my RN License. I completed all the paperwork for hire, took the NCLEX in January & passed in 75 questions, and informed my other job, of 8 continuous years, that I would be moving on to be a newly employed RN.
    I can't add anything that hasn't already been said. I think you are wise to wean off your controlled substances, even though theoretically you shouldn't have to.

    But this is the second thread I have come across where someone makes a point of how they passed NCLEX in 75 questions as though this is something which should figure in hiring decisions or which should indicate the competence of the nurse. I'm really puzzled by this. Are nursing schools pushing this train of thought?

    I wish you good luck and hope you come back and post when you do find a great job!


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