Latest Comments by Dela RN

Latest Comments by Dela RN

Dela RN 2,190 Views

Joined Apr 30, '11 - from 'AB, CA'. Posts: 44 (23% Liked) Likes: 25

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  • 0

    It doesn't hurt to apply since you don't know if you'll get it or not. Let that make your initial decision for you.

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    Quote from jeannette_dvo
    Do you have any idea how long to get a certificate? or it will took 6 months?
    Well judging fromt he website from centennial college... about a year?? They don't seem to get into specifics. But I wonder if the length of the program might change depending on the school.

    Continuing Education Program 7945 - RPN Operating Room

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    I'm not an OR nurse in Ontario but I am an OR nurse in Canada. I just recently finished the periop program. I have heard some staff in the OR recommend that new nurses try acute care first before going in to the OR. An OR nurse even highly encouraged her niece who was interested in the OR to try something out first so that she wasn't limiting herself. That being said there are a number of staff members who have only worked in the OR. They started out their in the final focus, took a periop course and have continued working there.

    My manager has said that they do prefer to hire new nurses for the periop course just because it is easier for them to transition. It's hard going from an expert in one field to a novice in another. Since the periop course can be expensive if taken on your initiative... I think like $5000 at the college near me, you can see if there are any hospitals hiring perioperative students that way you can get paid to work as well as they pay the course fees. Judging by the lack of jobs in Ontario this might be hard to find though...

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    RiRi03, dishes, and petethecanuck like this.

    What you are feeling right now is completely understandable. I graduated about a year ago and let me tell you, that first year of nursing is super hard...(As if it wasn't hard already?) There's a lot of research about transition shock and new grads. You can search some articles about it and the name Judy Boychuk Duchscher. You can also go to her website, Nursing the Future. BASICALLY you're going through transition and her research shows that a lot of new grads struggle with transitioning from a student nurse to a professional nurse. I remember one time, when I was struggling with my nursing job and I started seriously considering quitting nursing and beginning a new career so I picked up my Nursing the Future book for guidance and in the chapter about being 3-6months pst grad, it stated something a long the lines of you will consider quitting nursing. After that I laughed and just continued chugging along.

    By the one year mark, I felt okay at my job... Obviously not super confident because there is always a lot to learn but competent enough not to stress about going to work every day. There was a time too after I had first graduated where I would feel anxious before work and after work. I would stress out about work even on my days off too. To help with my anxiety, I did a lot of self-learning. I continued to read up on my patient's conditions and skills that I might have to perform. It's not that I didn't know them but it was more so a way of calming down my anxiety. Everyone likes some bit of control and this was my way of gaining some.

    If it makes you feel any better, I didn't do trach care as a student either. I wasn't allowed as a student. I saw people do it and my educator taught us during orientation but obviously, there's more anxiety when you have to do it on a real live patient instead of a doll. The first time I did it, I asked a fellow nurse to come in with me. Lucky for me I work on a great unit where they understand that new grads need extra support. You're not just new to the unit, you're new to nursing! I also went a year and a half into my nursing career before ever starting an IV. (I work in pediatrics with a lot of chubby babies where even experienced nurses sometimes had difficulties starting IVs).

    In regards to your patient assignment. Could you talk to your charge nurse about this especially if it keeps on happening that you're getting all the "hard" patients. Just makes you wonder if someone is being malicious or if that's just the acuity of your unit and there's nothing you can do about it. I know that on my unit, they try to give new grads or new hires easier/less acute patients.

    I know how you feel about asking questions... I think for the little things that you kinda know but want to make sure, try to find out the answer on your own before asking. Anything else try to find someone who likes to teach! Most importantly do you have someone you can vent and debrief with? Could you find a mentor on the unit?

    It's really too bad some experience nurses aren't receptive to teaching. They say from competent nurses rather than expert nurses make the best teachers. I think it's because they know what they're doing yet they still remember what it's like to be new at everything! So sorry about my ranting, keep on chugging away. Take advantage of learning opportunities and getting more skills.

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    I did it the other way around... So I was on the floor in pediatrics and just recently transferred into a peds periop. Even with my experience on the floor, I still found it hard to pick up PRN shifts because the periop program was so time consuming. Working M-F in the OR did not put me in the mood to pick up extra shifts. Also another thing to consider is the orientation period for pediatric floor nursing if you were to get a position. I'm not sure if you would be able to fit that all in with the periop commitment. Is it 2 year full time?

    2 years is a long time so things might change with you. Would it be hard for you to transition from the OR to the floor after 2 years? Probably but it would be the same the other way around. I think transitioning is always hard and probably even harder as a new grad.

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    Quote from tareija

    1. If you somehow have an "in" for a particular job (for instance, you know someone who works on that unit or did a clinical rotation there), is it ever appropriate to also approach the manager and let them know you've applied for the job? Or is one strictly supposed to go through HR and not contact managers?

    It sounds like it varies from unit to unit. I've heard of some units where they tell people who drop by to just go apply online. However from my own personal experience and from the experience of my friends who were job searching a year ago, it was good to go to the units, introduce yourself to the manager, give them your resume AND apply online through HR. This way the official paperwork of you applying online is there and then they can put a face to a name.

    Quote from tareija
    2. Similarly, in other professions, job hunters are encouraged to contact managers at businesses to ask about possible hiring of new staff, even if the company has no advertised job openings. Would one ever do such a thing in looking for a nursing job? For example, say that there's a unit I really want to work on, would it be okay to contact a manager to talk about this even if no job is posted, or is that not the done thing?


    Even if I unit does not have a specific posting, I don't think it would hurt to drop by and hand in your resume. For some reason my unit never posts casual positions (or at least I have never seen it). When they do post positions though, it seems like people from the casual pool sometimes get them and obviously they'll need to fill up their casual pool... So like I said previously I don't think it would hurt to stop by the unit and drop off an resumes, make and impressing to get an "in" even if it's a casual position.

    Quote from tareija
    3. How bad is the job situation for new grads right now?


    Not completely sure but I don't think it's as bad as it was a couple of years ago??? All my friends and I who graduated about a year or so ago are now employed. Also I'm in Alberta so I'm not sure how it is in BC.

    Quote from tareija
    4. Since I'm looking for my first nursing job, would it be useful to highlight any of my transferable skills from my previous career? For example, working with people, ability to multi-task and quickly make decisions, things like that? Or are skills from a previous career viewed as irrelevant?


    If it's relevant then highlight it but I would make sure to focus on nursing too Hope this helps a little!

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    I just took the final exam about 2 weeks ago. Some of the questions came right from the module questions. Pass is an 80% and and I ended up getting 83%. I believe you get like 4 hours to do it but don't quote me on that because I didn't end up using it... There was 113 questions and if you fail the first time you get a second try.

    As for studying, I had made notes for all the modules through out the course and just read through the notes. I made sure to do a lot of practice questions and that's about it.

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    I believe McGill has a masters of nursing program for those without an undergraduate in nursing.

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    Sometimes you really need to listen to your gut. Judging from what you're saying it probably wouldn't have been a great place to work at as a new grad. In my opinion, as a new grad it's more helpful to be in an work environment where there are senior, knowledgeable and helpful nurses that will help you grow as a professional nurse.

  • 0

    No experience with this but I would just contact the school and see what their policy is regarding this. They may have some hoops for you to jump through to prove that you are serious about it this time around.


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