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Joined Apr 8, '11. Posts: 84 (48% Liked) Likes: 103

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  • 2
    gcupid and lindarn like this.

    Quote from ProgressiveThinking
    Just wondering what everyone's perspective is on this. The average RN is 45 y/o, and shortages seem to be cyclical. Do you believe that over-saturation of the market with new grad nurses will obliterate the long-term shortage? OR..as the economy continues to show signs of improvement (slowly, but surely..it is), will nurses leave the profession like they did before the economy tanked?

    This article does a good job of putting things into perspective:

    http://www.nursetogether.com/Career/...or-Market.aspx
    I happen to think that the "shortage" was nothing but contrived media propaganda in the late 1990s, which was hyped up by our government, depts of labor and industry, hospitals and nursing homes, physician offices and outpatient facilities, to create an illusion of a job solid, well paying career path. It was so contrived and untrue that we now have a market saturation problem. Evidence, Doctors office in PA needs PT LPN, $12.00 per hour, no benefits.

  • 2
    Sehille4774 and CloudySky like this.

    Let me explain something about ASCs...you are at the sole whim of the docs who own the facility and they will not hesitate to cut your hours as their surgery schedule does not meet the demands of 40 hours a week. They do what they want, when they want , which is why they have no privlages at hospitals. I worked at 2 of these, and my hours were erratic and constantly changing...and yes, "techs" have now become the new nurse replacement at minimum wage

  • 0

    I have not only seen the "horizontal" violence, but also the "verticle" where a doctor is as rude and nasty as can be, and this is also tolerated

  • 0

    I just read the article and left a remark. It was a wonderful article and I am happy to have the opportunity to vent about it. This is such a problem in our profession and we all know that "only the **** survive." I read some of the comments in that article and saw patients complaining that they were bullied by a nurse. It is inconceivable how these nurses remain in their jobs. My opinion is that precepting should be eliminated entirely. When I started out, new grads could work as a GN until they passed the boards. I think that is part of the problem. RNs should be licensed as such before they start to work. Once you are licensed, you should be given your own patient assignment even if it is a small one. You should be able to ask questions to whomever you want, and get help from whomever is willing, without having a formal preceptor. In one job, there was a very nice nurse who was kind and understanding. I requested that I precept with her, because she was a pleasure to deal with. My current preceptor was a *****. I was told "she has too many personal problems" and was stuck with the nasty one. This really has to stop. BTW, I never transitioned from that job, and wound up quitting.

  • 0

    Excellent article. I posted a few responses to "nurses eating their young" . It is truly a demon in the profession and repeats itself year after year. I am hopeless when I learn that this happened to me 10 years ago, and is still happening today. If you put 5 nurses in a room with one patient, you will get 5 different assesments. This does not mean that one nurse is wrong and one is right, its just the way things are. In a precepting situation you have 2 licensed nurses with the same patient assignment. The preceptor should be there for questions and guidance, and to share knowledge. It should not be an opportunity to bash, boss and demean a fellow nurse. This seems like common sense, but it doesnt happen this way. Truly devastating.

  • 9

    When I tell people I am an unemployed nurse, I tend to get the "deer-in-the-headlights" look on their astonished faces, who believe wholeheartedly in the contrived propaganda of a nursing shortage. There never was one, never will be, but it has been as if a brainwashing mechanism has gushed into our national water supply and consumed by all, to keep this false and deliberate scheme out there in the public domain. All nursing schools still have waiting lists. The new grads who have not found jobs are now 2, 3 and even 4 years without work. I have seen what used to be jobs for RNs morph into "tech' jobs , and RNs being offered pitiful wages that are an embarrassment. If this continues it wont be long until the nurse-middleclass finds poverty at minimum wage.

  • 1
    lindarn likes this.

    Quote from Psychtrish39
    LindarnRN,
    How right you are and today I am going to an interview for a LPN job that will pay me $19.00 an hours top so I can pay bills . I have a chance at two other better positions but I must be working or I can't pay the bills. The woman I am interviewing with is an RN and is willing to let a fellow RN work for that because corporate says so. I have been crying in my coffee this morning about how I have came to this but I will do my best nursing work there and it doesnt really matter what I get paid as far as the patients and residents are concerned. However I can tell all nurses on here no employer cares if you are sick , they dont care if you have a heart, and they will get rid of you if you demand good patient care for your patients. I am living proof. I have thought many times if I could just get like other people and not care and not be the new one who is looked at and my practice is how I practice in any job my first duty is to my patients not the corporation. I tried working with a home health agency this month and it was ran by nurses. They cheated me out of pay and didnt pay me for training. I have turned them over to the Department of Labor. I fully believe you Linda and what you say and I hope I get this job today and I will swallow my pride though its leaving a knot in my heart. Thank you for posting this and its true nurses are not respected these days. Not at all.
    Quote from Karl Farmer
    HH all run millions of ads promising all kinds of work. They hire you and you get a few hours a week for a couple weeks, then nothing. Not to mention their asinine screening processes which are not required, nor to mention the vast amount of billing fraud they send out.

    Yes , right on the button. One Home Health Agency, Maximum Health Care, is currently about to lose its Medicare license for fraudulent billing

  • 5
    trixie333, tokidoki7, hope3456, and 2 others like this.

    Quote from Psychtrish39
    LindarnRN,
    How right you are and today I am going to an interview for a LPN job that will pay me $19.00 an hours top so I can pay bills . I have a chance at two other better positions but I must be working or I can't pay the bills. The woman I am interviewing with is an RN and is willing to let a fellow RN work for that because corporate says so. I have been crying in my coffee this morning about how I have came to this but I will do my best nursing work there and it doesnt really matter what I get paid as far as the patients and residents are concerned. However I can tell all nurses on here no employer cares if you are sick , they dont care if you have a heart, and they will get rid of you if you demand good patient care for your patients. I am living proof. I have thought many times if I could just get like other people and not care and not be the new one who is looked at and my practice is how I practice in any job my first duty is to my patients not the corporation. I tried working with a home health agency this month and it was ran by nurses. They cheated me out of pay and didnt pay me for training. I have turned them over to the Department of Labor. I fully believe you Linda and what you say and I hope I get this job today and I will swallow my pride though its leaving a knot in my heart. Thank you for posting this and its true nurses are not respected these days. Not at all.
    Beware of homecare agencies. They are all the same. They will waste your time and your gas dangling employment that does not exist. I was also cheated out of training pay. They advertise jobs as if business is booming when they do not have a single solitary hour of work for anyone. They post job ads because they hope a new case will arise so that they can have a fresh new hire staff it. It never happens and I refuse to keep looking in the homecare arena. This is pathetic!

  • 3
    lindarn, netglow, and elprup like this.

    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Ya'll girls don't have a clue, do ya? *LOL*

    Back in the 1940's the government questioned RNs as part of a study to find out the reasons for the nursing shortage. What were the reasons nurses left the profession and detered those from seeking entry?

    Lack of self esteem
    Low respect
    Low wages
    Schedule of hours and days worked
    Lack of autonomy


    Did things change? By and large no they did not, thus when basically the same body went around again asking the same in the 1970's (again to find out reasons for the nursing shortage), almost the exact responses were received.

    I've said this before and am saying it again for god and the world to hear; by and large there never has been a "nursing shortage", excluding perhaps during times of war. What you had were vast numbers of nurses who could not or would not put up with what hospitals/healthcare settings dished out. So they married, or took employment outside of nursing; in short anything to get off the floors/units.

    There was a time when at least nurses who were dedicated to the profession and kept with it (often giving up chances at marriage and a family), regardless of what was thrown at them could count on being kept employed and moving up the career ladder. From staff nurse, to head nurse, to supervisor to DON, and so forth. Now of course one's education levels and past experience are no promise of even nabbing a charge position much less "vice president of nursing services.....).

    What many nurses who left did, and still continued to do was keep their licenses active. Following the oft given advice to young women that nursing was an excellent profession for them because it could be put down and picked up again should life changes require.

    Julia wasn't the first nor last nurse thrust by the death of a husband, divorce or simply the family (or herself), required more income to dust off her whites and cap and hit the floors. What we have today is simply there aren't many other jobs out there for nurses to move into if they are fed up. So they stick with things because a bad job is better than nothing. Especially if your husband, family and others are looking to you for the pay-check.

    It does not surprise me to hear nurses whinging in media about their sorry lot. As I've said years ago they would have left, but as that isn't possible for most, they must bear things as best they can. One way to at least get some of their own back is to gripe in public as it certainly does not seem hospital management seems to care. Indeed once again the latter has nurses by the short and crurlies. With jobs scarce in many areas many nurses probably fear rocking the boat will get them the "if you are unhappy here...... I can replace you like *that*... I've a stack of resumes in my office.....).

    In short:
    *Beatings will continue until morale improves...*
    Excellent, excellent post. There never has been a nursing shortage. Its recycling of nurses, adding more new ones so that the market is so saturated wages fall to pitiful levels. One job I am after will only pay $2.00 less per hour than what I got starting out in 2001.

  • 9

    I had an interview a month ago for a part-time RN. The employer received so many resumes, that they had each applicant "audition for a shift" and actually hired and paid no-one!. Last I checked it is one month later and they are still "job auditioning" RNs each and every day.

    This really ****** me off.

  • 0
  • 1
    pensue37 likes this.

    One of the things that I never understood was why these "precepting nurses" are allowed to continue down a path of emarassing, humiliating, and chastising new hires. In most of my experience, the nurses who were precepting have done this over and over and over and are able to keep their jobs without question. It was and is mind boggling that management overall is so poor as to allow this behavior in the first place. Such a shame that many nurses who took out steep loans and went through the grueling process of nursing school are being released into a venemous environment. It was after a few of these similar experiences that I gave up on hospital nursing altogether. I am convinced that hospitals hire nurses, when there are not actual positions for them to fill, train them for 3 months , anticipating that during those months someone will leave , and when that does not happen, the new hire gets brought into a managers office, made to feel like a total knucklehead without cause, and dismissed.

  • 1
    pensue37 likes this.

    Every precepting experience I had was horrible. Hospitals are really the only places that do this, which is why I dont work in them anymore. In fact, I made it clear in an interview once that I refuse to be precepted. An experienced nurse should already know what to do, so short of training for one shift to learn where things are, there should be no precepting. Precepting is for new grads, but hospitals dont seem to care if you have zero experience or 20 years. After being in this field for 10 yrs, I have found that nurses are the most insecure , back biting and back stabbing people I have ever met. I dont care if I ever go back into this again...overall, a horrible experience

  • 7

    I have also noticed that the false "nursing shortage " propaganda helped to foster this environment of frequent firing. The more nurses there are, the quicker all nurses become a dime a dozen. Frequent firing allows for wage control and reduction, never having to give someone a raise or benefits either. This is not only true for nurses, but most other vocations within the healthcare industry.

  • 4

    I have noticed a disturbing pattern of new nurses getting fired. I attribute this to 2 things.

    1. As soon as a nurse is eligible for medical benefits, days off and all of the other BS that is advertised, they are booted, usually at exactly 3 months.

    2. The new nurse thinks she is being hired permanently, but is in fact a replacement nurse for someone out on medical leave, workers comp, etc. The employer does not want to pay for a staffing agency nurse which runs at about $65.00/hour, so they hire someone cheap, then kick them out when the other nurse returns.

    I have also noticed that, in the past, hospitals will hire as many new grads as possible, also cheap, to ward off the need for agency staffing. They hire people on, when there is no actual job vacancy. They roll the dice that someone will give notice while the new nurses are in training. If that happens, a new nurse becomes permanent, and transitions off orientation. If no one leaves, the new nurse is let go at the end of orientation, and they start the process ll over again. This allows hospitals to avoid using costly agency personnel.

    It sucks, really


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