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looking for work, RN 3,332 Views

Joined Apr 8, '11 - from 'PA'. looking for work is a unemployed. She has '15' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'med/surg/tele/LTC/homecare/correctional/'. Posts: 94 (51% Liked) Likes: 131

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  • Dec 4

    I can think of 2 instances when I gave 2 weeks notice and was then told not to show up for work. Employers use a resignation letter to retaliate against the employee. I have heard of this happening to many nurses, CNA's etc. The "not eligible for re-hire" question is so broadly abused by employers that its credence is diminshed. References can make or break your job search. Many places are now requesting references that are not former employers because former employers only give out dates of employment. The "eligible for re-hire" question is either checked off or not, but is not even a credible measure of any performance review or lack therof. Hospitals and SNFs are famous for blackballing former nurses. They are so famous for it that I have had to take certain jobs off of my resume, therefore having experience but not being able to disclose it. This is a major problem across the nursing profession, as every single one of my colleages has had to deal with this at one point or another.

  • Feb 12

    Quote from Jules A
    I'm doubtful that hospitals have a goal in place to undermine new grads in an effort to get rid of them and start all over again but we can agree to disagree on that. As for floating in my experience for the most part we worked wherever there was a need and it sounded to me the OP had what would have been considered sufficient orientation, apparently that is not a universal opinion. Yep and like I said the night was rough no doubt but I still wouldn't recommend being wound so tight you start sobbing at the mention of an assignment.
    JulesA,

    The nursing profession has one of the highest turnover/ burn out rates when compared to other career choices. In my area alone, there are faciltiies that have a 100% turnover every 6 months, second only to fast food joints. Maybe its just me ...I have experienced this in NJ and PA alike. These hospitals are all the same around here, and based on many of the comments I have seen in here, this is an everywhere problem, not just in my neck of the woods. Nurses get forced out or fired on a regular basis all over the place, thanks only to the fake nursing shortage that caused people to flock to nursing schools in droves. We now have an over saturated market with many more nurses than jobs, and likewise, the hospitals licking their lips as they find the next sucker who will put up with a system that sets them up to fail. I have shed too many tears (maybe not directly on the job, but yes, on my way out the door) to not have a strong opinion on this thread about the way nurses are routinely used and abused like clockwork in hospitals, nursing homes, etc...it is quite frankly disgusting, and the more nurses put up with this treatment, the worse it gets for everyone. I for one have been hammered right out of a job for speaking up, refusing to take the BS, doing what is right, etc. The OP is a product of hospital abuse that never changes because nurses are a dime a dozen. And that is so sad.

  • Feb 12

    Honestly JulesA? The practice of floating should be completely voluntary for the nurse and never , ever, ever for a brand new nurse, even if she wanted to float. Floating is just another term for a hospital that refuses to properly staff and train and orient nurses...and to be honest, is the main reason why nursing has become so stressful. If a hospital wants to have "floaters" they should hire "floaters" and give them a full week of orientation on each unit they will be floating to. Fact is that this is just another ******** who could care less about its employees or its patients, not unlike most places today. Reading her rant struck a cord in me because it reminded me so vividly how hospitals set up new nurses to fail and burn out, with glee. When they have sucked every drop of blood from this new nurse and she begins to teeter totter on the brink of her own sanity they will can her, or force her out, and start the same process all over again with someone new. Been there, done that. This profession is such a joke.

  • Jan 27

    Quote from roser13
    OP, this poster has been dispensing doom & gloom all afternoon. Please disregard.

    To your feelings of inadequacy: don't you think we ALL felt that way at first?! What helps when you start your very first orientation is to have a mantra: "Today is only my first day. There is no way that I will be responsible for anything more serious than signing my name 2 dozen times in Orientation. I wil survive today."

    As Orientation & Preception proceeds, you will always be able to find something that "won't" be expected of you yet, but you will also likely find yourself more & more eager to take on new responsibilities.
    ummm sorry roser13, but I am a realist, not a cheerleader at a pep rally. I had no access to these internet comment forums when I made the decision to go to nursing school. Wish I had. My decision was made due to the fake propoganda that there was a dire nursing shortage, loads of fake "sign on bonuses" appearing in the classified sections, and the overall feeling that if you were a good person, a smart person and a hard worker you would be able to excel in this field. I was mislead, and now I have a ton of debt that I cannot pay off. I have been made miserable by the profession itself. I have given 200% on every shift I ever worked and got back nothing but aggravation, verticle/horizontal bullying, a lack of even basic respect from co-workers or superiors, and found myself constantly changing jobs because of the hell hole environments that no sane person can tolerate. Sorry its not all rainbows and butterflies. On the upside, I met some truly wonderful people who experienced the same abuse as I did, left their jobs, and then left the entire profession. I keep meeting more and more people who have left nursing behind, have transitioned to lower pay work to save their sanity, and those who stay in it out of sheer fiancial necessity and nothing else. A fellow nurse co-worker told me that she refused to pay for her kid's education if she chose nursing. Another realist. The truth hurts, but it is necessary.

  • Jan 25

    Oh my, I see nothing has changed from the days I used to work in a hospital. I hate to be negative for you, but I see the hospital has no respect for you as a nurse, and likely has a revolving door of nurses. First, the practice of orienting a new nurse on day shift, when they are hired for nights is a bad practice that really has to stop. It is hard enough breaking into the hospital nursing field, without the added stress of screwing up your circadian rythm right from the door. I too had to go through the hell of orienting on a different shift than I was hired for, then adjusting my sleep pattern for my real shift. This is not easily done, and wreaks havoc on anyone, regardless of skill level or years of experience. Second, floating a new nurse anywhere but their assigned unit is a practice that almost all facilities do these days because they refuse to properly staff their floors and units. Thus, new nurses have become everywhere, everytime nurses, to the detriment of themselves and their patients. Third, they already flexed you to stay home...yet another lousy but popular staffing game that is played by all facilities to boost their bottom lines. I can see the work environment is no different now than it was when I started in 2001, and has gotten worse with every single year. I have seen CNAs getting nurses fired, and CNAs so incredibly insubordinate that they should not have jobs. This is intolerable, as is the "floating" and training on opposite shifts, and then on top of it all, being badgered by a charge nurse to boot. This is why I left the field mostly, and only retuned to nursing when I really had absolutely no other choices. This profession is terminally screwed up, because their are so many more nurses than there are jobs, and hospitals can continue to treat us all like slaves for the bottom line. Professionalism is something that has never existed in any hospital or nursing home. The last job I had was through an agency a year ago. They had computerized MARS. My first shift I received no training at all, and had to sweat my way through a unit with 22 patients. I went back the next day to see that I was moved to a different unit, with 22 new faces, to exacerbate the fact that I still had a long way to go before I was clearly functional on the computerized MAR system. I refused the assignment because they could have easily placed me on the same unit, but chose not to. This is inexcusable. When I refused the assignment , the charge nurse threatened to report me to the State Board for job abandonment. I returned home, called my agency, and told them that I refuse to work at this hell hole ever again.

  • Jan 19

    Quote from roser13
    OP, this poster has been dispensing doom & gloom all afternoon. Please disregard.

    To your feelings of inadequacy: don't you think we ALL felt that way at first?! What helps when you start your very first orientation is to have a mantra: "Today is only my first day. There is no way that I will be responsible for anything more serious than signing my name 2 dozen times in Orientation. I wil survive today."

    As Orientation & Preception proceeds, you will always be able to find something that "won't" be expected of you yet, but you will also likely find yourself more & more eager to take on new responsibilities.
    ummm sorry roser13, but I am a realist, not a cheerleader at a pep rally. I had no access to these internet comment forums when I made the decision to go to nursing school. Wish I had. My decision was made due to the fake propoganda that there was a dire nursing shortage, loads of fake "sign on bonuses" appearing in the classified sections, and the overall feeling that if you were a good person, a smart person and a hard worker you would be able to excel in this field. I was mislead, and now I have a ton of debt that I cannot pay off. I have been made miserable by the profession itself. I have given 200% on every shift I ever worked and got back nothing but aggravation, verticle/horizontal bullying, a lack of even basic respect from co-workers or superiors, and found myself constantly changing jobs because of the hell hole environments that no sane person can tolerate. Sorry its not all rainbows and butterflies. On the upside, I met some truly wonderful people who experienced the same abuse as I did, left their jobs, and then left the entire profession. I keep meeting more and more people who have left nursing behind, have transitioned to lower pay work to save their sanity, and those who stay in it out of sheer fiancial necessity and nothing else. A fellow nurse co-worker told me that she refused to pay for her kid's education if she chose nursing. Another realist. The truth hurts, but it is necessary.

  • Jan 19

    Hi kyfitch...years ago I was in nursing school and the clinical rotations were basically a huge waste of time. The nurses on the units refused to allow us to do anything meaningful, and we were basically diaper changers, bed bath/ and bed makers, assigned to one or two patients for the six hours that we had to be there. The only real skill we actually learned was taking vital signs. New nurses learn how to be nurses by the experiences they have on the job, not the clinical rotations at school. That being said, I feel sorry for you being a guy in this field. We only had one or two guys in my nursing classes and they were failed out unfairly by bully nurse instructors. I will not lie to you. You have an uphill battle waiting for you because jobs are so hard to find, and most hospitals are either laying off, or only hiring per diems. Its really hard to get your foot in the door, and I only hope that when you get that first job, it is the right place with the right people. I have too often stepped into "frying pan" jobs that were cesspools of harassment and bullying from the start, and did not last long or well. Where are you? Here in PA there are too many nurses, thus the job market really sucks.

  • Jan 19

    Quote from Jules A
    I'm doubtful that hospitals have a goal in place to undermine new grads in an effort to get rid of them and start all over again but we can agree to disagree on that. As for floating in my experience for the most part we worked wherever there was a need and it sounded to me the OP had what would have been considered sufficient orientation, apparently that is not a universal opinion. Yep and like I said the night was rough no doubt but I still wouldn't recommend being wound so tight you start sobbing at the mention of an assignment.
    JulesA,

    The nursing profession has one of the highest turnover/ burn out rates when compared to other career choices. In my area alone, there are faciltiies that have a 100% turnover every 6 months, second only to fast food joints. Maybe its just me ...I have experienced this in NJ and PA alike. These hospitals are all the same around here, and based on many of the comments I have seen in here, this is an everywhere problem, not just in my neck of the woods. Nurses get forced out or fired on a regular basis all over the place, thanks only to the fake nursing shortage that caused people to flock to nursing schools in droves. We now have an over saturated market with many more nurses than jobs, and likewise, the hospitals licking their lips as they find the next sucker who will put up with a system that sets them up to fail. I have shed too many tears (maybe not directly on the job, but yes, on my way out the door) to not have a strong opinion on this thread about the way nurses are routinely used and abused like clockwork in hospitals, nursing homes, etc...it is quite frankly disgusting, and the more nurses put up with this treatment, the worse it gets for everyone. I for one have been hammered right out of a job for speaking up, refusing to take the BS, doing what is right, etc. The OP is a product of hospital abuse that never changes because nurses are a dime a dozen. And that is so sad.

  • Jan 17

    Quote from Jules A
    I'm doubtful that hospitals have a goal in place to undermine new grads in an effort to get rid of them and start all over again but we can agree to disagree on that. As for floating in my experience for the most part we worked wherever there was a need and it sounded to me the OP had what would have been considered sufficient orientation, apparently that is not a universal opinion. Yep and like I said the night was rough no doubt but I still wouldn't recommend being wound so tight you start sobbing at the mention of an assignment.
    JulesA,

    The nursing profession has one of the highest turnover/ burn out rates when compared to other career choices. In my area alone, there are faciltiies that have a 100% turnover every 6 months, second only to fast food joints. Maybe its just me ...I have experienced this in NJ and PA alike. These hospitals are all the same around here, and based on many of the comments I have seen in here, this is an everywhere problem, not just in my neck of the woods. Nurses get forced out or fired on a regular basis all over the place, thanks only to the fake nursing shortage that caused people to flock to nursing schools in droves. We now have an over saturated market with many more nurses than jobs, and likewise, the hospitals licking their lips as they find the next sucker who will put up with a system that sets them up to fail. I have shed too many tears (maybe not directly on the job, but yes, on my way out the door) to not have a strong opinion on this thread about the way nurses are routinely used and abused like clockwork in hospitals, nursing homes, etc...it is quite frankly disgusting, and the more nurses put up with this treatment, the worse it gets for everyone. I for one have been hammered right out of a job for speaking up, refusing to take the BS, doing what is right, etc. The OP is a product of hospital abuse that never changes because nurses are a dime a dozen. And that is so sad.

  • Jan 17

    Honestly JulesA? The practice of floating should be completely voluntary for the nurse and never , ever, ever for a brand new nurse, even if she wanted to float. Floating is just another term for a hospital that refuses to properly staff and train and orient nurses...and to be honest, is the main reason why nursing has become so stressful. If a hospital wants to have "floaters" they should hire "floaters" and give them a full week of orientation on each unit they will be floating to. Fact is that this is just another ******** who could care less about its employees or its patients, not unlike most places today. Reading her rant struck a cord in me because it reminded me so vividly how hospitals set up new nurses to fail and burn out, with glee. When they have sucked every drop of blood from this new nurse and she begins to teeter totter on the brink of her own sanity they will can her, or force her out, and start the same process all over again with someone new. Been there, done that. This profession is such a joke.

  • Jan 17

    Oh my, I see nothing has changed from the days I used to work in a hospital. I hate to be negative for you, but I see the hospital has no respect for you as a nurse, and likely has a revolving door of nurses. First, the practice of orienting a new nurse on day shift, when they are hired for nights is a bad practice that really has to stop. It is hard enough breaking into the hospital nursing field, without the added stress of screwing up your circadian rythm right from the door. I too had to go through the hell of orienting on a different shift than I was hired for, then adjusting my sleep pattern for my real shift. This is not easily done, and wreaks havoc on anyone, regardless of skill level or years of experience. Second, floating a new nurse anywhere but their assigned unit is a practice that almost all facilities do these days because they refuse to properly staff their floors and units. Thus, new nurses have become everywhere, everytime nurses, to the detriment of themselves and their patients. Third, they already flexed you to stay home...yet another lousy but popular staffing game that is played by all facilities to boost their bottom lines. I can see the work environment is no different now than it was when I started in 2001, and has gotten worse with every single year. I have seen CNAs getting nurses fired, and CNAs so incredibly insubordinate that they should not have jobs. This is intolerable, as is the "floating" and training on opposite shifts, and then on top of it all, being badgered by a charge nurse to boot. This is why I left the field mostly, and only retuned to nursing when I really had absolutely no other choices. This profession is terminally screwed up, because their are so many more nurses than there are jobs, and hospitals can continue to treat us all like slaves for the bottom line. Professionalism is something that has never existed in any hospital or nursing home. The last job I had was through an agency a year ago. They had computerized MARS. My first shift I received no training at all, and had to sweat my way through a unit with 22 patients. I went back the next day to see that I was moved to a different unit, with 22 new faces, to exacerbate the fact that I still had a long way to go before I was clearly functional on the computerized MAR system. I refused the assignment because they could have easily placed me on the same unit, but chose not to. This is inexcusable. When I refused the assignment , the charge nurse threatened to report me to the State Board for job abandonment. I returned home, called my agency, and told them that I refuse to work at this hell hole ever again.

  • Jan 17

    Hello Johnathan. I have been an RN for many years and have experienced many negatives, such as you have. First, since being a nurse, I worked in hospitals, nursing homes, a jail, rehabs, surgical facilities, a doctors office and homecare. Do not fall for the story they gave you about why you were let go. The real reason is for money, and the desire to constantly have a turnover in staff so no one ever accumulates benefits and time off. The nursing field is over saturated, and there is always someone who will work for less money. Doctors are some of the greediest creatures alive. Its all about their pockets and their bank accounts. They are constantly downsizing and looking to cut corners and save $$$$ without any regard for the employee at all. I have seen this time and again.What really bothers me the most is that instead of just telling the truth and admitting that they are greedy, they tell you a tall tale, ruin your confidence and create drama for no reason at all. At one job, I was working full time, and they were bleeding me of every ounce of energy that I had in my body. Naturally, I was worn down, caught a virus that had me running to the bathroom every 10 minutes, so I had no choice but to use my sick days. When I returned, I was told that I already used up my sick day allottment, and that was considered excessive, because it was only the beginning of the year. While they were crapping all over me and making me feel lazy and worthless, they were simulatanleously hiring two part time LPNs to replace me at a cheaper rate without benefits. Then they let me go. I tried to use my health benefits before they got cancelled, but found out at the doctors office that I was never even enrolled in the healthplan. I had an insurance card because they signed me up, and cancelled the policy the same day, so I would think that I had benefits. As I said before, you will soon learn what greedy bastards exist in the medical field. Never let them shatter your confidence, no matter how hard they try to. It is all based on sheer greed and beefing up their own pockets.

  • Jan 17

    Hello Johnathan. I have been an RN for many years and have experienced many negatives, such as you have. First, since being a nurse, I worked in hospitals, nursing homes, a jail, rehabs, surgical facilities, a doctors office and homecare. Do not fall for the story they gave you about why you were let go. The real reason is for money, and the desire to constantly have a turnover in staff so no one ever accumulates benefits and time off. The nursing field is over saturated, and there is always someone who will work for less money. Doctors are some of the greediest creatures alive. Its all about their pockets and their bank accounts. They are constantly downsizing and looking to cut corners and save $$$$ without any regard for the employee at all. I have seen this time and again.What really bothers me the most is that instead of just telling the truth and admitting that they are greedy, they tell you a tall tale, ruin your confidence and create drama for no reason at all. At one job, I was working full time, and they were bleeding me of every ounce of energy that I had in my body. Naturally, I was worn down, caught a virus that had me running to the bathroom every 10 minutes, so I had no choice but to use my sick days. When I returned, I was told that I already used up my sick day allottment, and that was considered excessive, because it was only the beginning of the year. While they were crapping all over me and making me feel lazy and worthless, they were simulatanleously hiring two part time LPNs to replace me at a cheaper rate without benefits. Then they let me go. I tried to use my health benefits before they got cancelled, but found out at the doctors office that I was never even enrolled in the healthplan. I had an insurance card because they signed me up, and cancelled the policy the same day, so I would think that I had benefits. As I said before, you will soon learn what greedy bastards exist in the medical field. Never let them shatter your confidence, no matter how hard they try to. It is all based on sheer greed and beefing up their own pockets.

  • Jan 17

    Honestly JulesA? The practice of floating should be completely voluntary for the nurse and never , ever, ever for a brand new nurse, even if she wanted to float. Floating is just another term for a hospital that refuses to properly staff and train and orient nurses...and to be honest, is the main reason why nursing has become so stressful. If a hospital wants to have "floaters" they should hire "floaters" and give them a full week of orientation on each unit they will be floating to. Fact is that this is just another ******** who could care less about its employees or its patients, not unlike most places today. Reading her rant struck a cord in me because it reminded me so vividly how hospitals set up new nurses to fail and burn out, with glee. When they have sucked every drop of blood from this new nurse and she begins to teeter totter on the brink of her own sanity they will can her, or force her out, and start the same process all over again with someone new. Been there, done that. This profession is such a joke.

  • Jan 17

    Quote from Jules A
    I'm doubtful that hospitals have a goal in place to undermine new grads in an effort to get rid of them and start all over again but we can agree to disagree on that. As for floating in my experience for the most part we worked wherever there was a need and it sounded to me the OP had what would have been considered sufficient orientation, apparently that is not a universal opinion. Yep and like I said the night was rough no doubt but I still wouldn't recommend being wound so tight you start sobbing at the mention of an assignment.
    JulesA,

    The nursing profession has one of the highest turnover/ burn out rates when compared to other career choices. In my area alone, there are faciltiies that have a 100% turnover every 6 months, second only to fast food joints. Maybe its just me ...I have experienced this in NJ and PA alike. These hospitals are all the same around here, and based on many of the comments I have seen in here, this is an everywhere problem, not just in my neck of the woods. Nurses get forced out or fired on a regular basis all over the place, thanks only to the fake nursing shortage that caused people to flock to nursing schools in droves. We now have an over saturated market with many more nurses than jobs, and likewise, the hospitals licking their lips as they find the next sucker who will put up with a system that sets them up to fail. I have shed too many tears (maybe not directly on the job, but yes, on my way out the door) to not have a strong opinion on this thread about the way nurses are routinely used and abused like clockwork in hospitals, nursing homes, etc...it is quite frankly disgusting, and the more nurses put up with this treatment, the worse it gets for everyone. I for one have been hammered right out of a job for speaking up, refusing to take the BS, doing what is right, etc. The OP is a product of hospital abuse that never changes because nurses are a dime a dozen. And that is so sad.


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