Latest Likes For Double-Helix

Latest Likes For Double-Helix

Double-Helix, BSN 22,745 Views

Joined Apr 5, '11 - from 'New Jersey'. Double-Helix is a Nurse, Children's Hospital. Posts: 2,684 (50% Liked) Likes: 4,635

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  • May 2

    We'd need a little more information. Are you looking for an ADN or BSN program? Have you taken any pre-reqs or no? Do you have a target area or are you willing to move?

  • May 2

    We'd need a little more information. Are you looking for an ADN or BSN program? Have you taken any pre-reqs or no? Do you have a target area or are you willing to move?

  • May 1

    These things happen. I'm sure you'll always remember to review labs from here on out. You're not the only one who overlooked it either. Both his doctor and the overnight nurse missed it to. Learn from this, and try not to be too hard on yourself.

  • Apr 26

    I'm trying to quote your post but this browser isn't cooperating, so please bear with me:

    and then I decide that a strep test is in order. I gather my swab and tongue blade only to be met with resistance by the parent. Not that the parent doesn't want the test done, but they don't want to make their child hold still for the test.

    Parents are going to be resistant to putting their already sick child through something uncomfortable if they aren't certain it's necessary. Deciding yourself, as a nurse, to perform (essentially ordering) a strep test is outside of your scope of practice unless you have standing orders. Even if it's done routinely- even if you know it's what is going to be ordered. After consulting with a provider, you can then tell the parents what uncomfortable or painful procedure needs to be done. They will be more willing to comply if they know the doctor wants it done.

    As a result, I try to coax the child into allowing me to do the test by telling that that it's fast and I promise it won't hurt. I even demonstrate by letting another nurse do the test on me. Also, I'd bribe the patient with things like "if you let me do this test I'll get you a popsicle"

    These are all valid attempts at educating the patient and family about the test. Demonstrating is good, when possible. Avoid "bribing", but you can offer rewards. Just try not to phrase it like the child has a choice. You can say, "If you let me do this, I'll get you popsicle." But that gives the child the choice to say "no." Say something along the lines of, "Once we swab your mouth I'll get you a popsicle to help your throat feel better. The child doesn't have a choice about getting the test done, but you can give them options when they have them. "Would you like to sit on mom's lap while we swab your mouth or on the bed?".


    (we even had our guy nurse come-in to use as a threat in order to get the child to agree to the test though this did not help)

    You addressed this already, but please do not threaten or allow yourself to be used as a threat to a child. When it happens in front of a family, correct it immediately. Say, "No, I am not going to hold your child down, but I can help you work with her to get this test done in a way that is easiest for all of us and gets her the care she needs to get better." To the nurse who does it, say, "I am not going to be used to threaten children to cooperate. I am a professional and children shouldn't be made afraid of me anymore than you would want them afraid of you."

    I blame the parent for allowing their children to get out of hand. They are children, they need to be told what and how to do things.

    Do you have children? Let me let you in on a not-so-secret emotion that we parents have called "helplessness". Those tiny little humans are the most important thing in the world to us. It's our job to take care of them. When we can't- when they are sick or hurt or they have to experience pain and discomfort in order to get better- we are overwhelmed by helplessness. It terrifies us. It frustrates us. It makes us angry, and emotional, and feel inadequate. And in that hospital room, when we need to ask- make- our child to do something we know will cause discomfort or pain- we are lost. They may be our child, but we have much less experience in that area than you do. Sometimes parents need some direction. Please do not blame parents for not knowing how to respond in a situation that they are entirely unfamiliar with. (Unless they are actually being belligerent in which case you escalate and get the provider in the room to talk to them.) They need you to tell them what to do, and how to help you AND their child. Asking the parent and child to do something is very different than telling them what needs to be done. This can be done professionally, and gently. Saying something to the mother like, "The easiest way to do this is usually with Sally sitting on your lap. I'm going to have another nurse come in to help remind her to keep her arms still, since it's normal for her to want to reach for her mouth." To Sally, "Sally, Mom is going to give you a hug. My friend Jane is going to come into help you hold your arms still. Then you're going to open your mouth for me and say "AHHH" while I count to five. Then I'm going to swab your mouth and you'll be all done and can have some juice or a popsicle."

    I'm going to disagree with jrt4's statement that parents should not hold children. However I think he/she was unclear. Parents shouldn't be asked to restrain a child (hold them down), however there are wonderful things called "comfort holds" that can be used to facilitate many various tests and procedures. These involve the caregiver holding the child in various ways that provide both safety and comfort. I suggest looking them up, as they can be very helpful tools.

  • Apr 19

    The fact is it doesn't matter if you believe the patient. It doesn't even matter if the patient was telling the truth. The patient has a right to be reasonably accommodated in their healthcare decisions, provided it doesn't jeopardize safety. If the patient wants to be assigned female staff, whether its because of a h/o abuse, cultural reasons, undisclosed personal reasons, or simply because he doesn't feel comfortable with another male seeing him naked, that should be accommodated, provided there are ample female staff available.

  • Apr 18

    The fact is it doesn't matter if you believe the patient. It doesn't even matter if the patient was telling the truth. The patient has a right to be reasonably accommodated in their healthcare decisions, provided it doesn't jeopardize safety. If the patient wants to be assigned female staff, whether its because of a h/o abuse, cultural reasons, undisclosed personal reasons, or simply because he doesn't feel comfortable with another male seeing him naked, that should be accommodated, provided there are ample female staff available.

  • Apr 16

    Tell your instructor about the conversation and your concerns. If the instructors feel this behavior could affect her clinical performance, they will investigate further. If you feel led, privately, express to this classmate that her statements earlier were concerning to you, and remind her that the school has mental health resources available to her if she feels she needs them.

    Short of that, she is an adult, and you can't force someone to seek medical attention unless they appear to be a danger to themselves or others.

  • Apr 14

    Let's think for a minute about what HIPAA is. Health Information Portability and Accountability Act. While what it actually is, and who and what it covers is a very detailed topic, the short version is that a HIPAA violation involves releasing or sharing protected health information without the consent of the involved party.

    So now you can answer your own question. If the parent was not a patient of this provider, nor a patient at the hospital, they are not protected by HIPAA. Arrests/criminal actions are a matter of public record and not at all related to HIPAA. Inquiring about one's neighbor who was arrested, regardless of where they were arrested, is in no way related to HIPAA.

    This story sounds like the "Lemonjello and Orangello" twins. Everyone says they have heard of patients by those names, yet no one can provide proof that they exist.

  • Apr 14

    The fact is it doesn't matter if you believe the patient. It doesn't even matter if the patient was telling the truth. The patient has a right to be reasonably accommodated in their healthcare decisions, provided it doesn't jeopardize safety. If the patient wants to be assigned female staff, whether its because of a h/o abuse, cultural reasons, undisclosed personal reasons, or simply because he doesn't feel comfortable with another male seeing him naked, that should be accommodated, provided there are ample female staff available.

  • Apr 14

    Let's think for a minute about what HIPAA is. Health Information Portability and Accountability Act. While what it actually is, and who and what it covers is a very detailed topic, the short version is that a HIPAA violation involves releasing or sharing protected health information without the consent of the involved party.

    So now you can answer your own question. If the parent was not a patient of this provider, nor a patient at the hospital, they are not protected by HIPAA. Arrests/criminal actions are a matter of public record and not at all related to HIPAA. Inquiring about one's neighbor who was arrested, regardless of where they were arrested, is in no way related to HIPAA.

    This story sounds like the "Lemonjello and Orangello" twins. Everyone says they have heard of patients by those names, yet no one can provide proof that they exist.

  • Apr 13

    In addition, you can also call your facility's Compliance Department (some places have a hotline). You should be able to do this anonymously.

  • Apr 13

    Let's think for a minute about what HIPAA is. Health Information Portability and Accountability Act. While what it actually is, and who and what it covers is a very detailed topic, the short version is that a HIPAA violation involves releasing or sharing protected health information without the consent of the involved party.

    So now you can answer your own question. If the parent was not a patient of this provider, nor a patient at the hospital, they are not protected by HIPAA. Arrests/criminal actions are a matter of public record and not at all related to HIPAA. Inquiring about one's neighbor who was arrested, regardless of where they were arrested, is in no way related to HIPAA.

    This story sounds like the "Lemonjello and Orangello" twins. Everyone says they have heard of patients by those names, yet no one can provide proof that they exist.

  • Apr 11

    Let's think for a minute about what HIPAA is. Health Information Portability and Accountability Act. While what it actually is, and who and what it covers is a very detailed topic, the short version is that a HIPAA violation involves releasing or sharing protected health information without the consent of the involved party.

    So now you can answer your own question. If the parent was not a patient of this provider, nor a patient at the hospital, they are not protected by HIPAA. Arrests/criminal actions are a matter of public record and not at all related to HIPAA. Inquiring about one's neighbor who was arrested, regardless of where they were arrested, is in no way related to HIPAA.

    This story sounds like the "Lemonjello and Orangello" twins. Everyone says they have heard of patients by those names, yet no one can provide proof that they exist.

  • Apr 11

    Tell your instructor about the conversation and your concerns. If the instructors feel this behavior could affect her clinical performance, they will investigate further. If you feel led, privately, express to this classmate that her statements earlier were concerning to you, and remind her that the school has mental health resources available to her if she feels she needs them.

    Short of that, she is an adult, and you can't force someone to seek medical attention unless they appear to be a danger to themselves or others.

  • Apr 9

    Let's think for a minute about what HIPAA is. Health Information Portability and Accountability Act. While what it actually is, and who and what it covers is a very detailed topic, the short version is that a HIPAA violation involves releasing or sharing protected health information without the consent of the involved party.

    So now you can answer your own question. If the parent was not a patient of this provider, nor a patient at the hospital, they are not protected by HIPAA. Arrests/criminal actions are a matter of public record and not at all related to HIPAA. Inquiring about one's neighbor who was arrested, regardless of where they were arrested, is in no way related to HIPAA.

    This story sounds like the "Lemonjello and Orangello" twins. Everyone says they have heard of patients by those names, yet no one can provide proof that they exist.


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