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Double-Helix, BSN, RN 33,626 Views

Joined Apr 5, '11 - from 'New Jersey'. Double-Helix is a Nurse, Children's Hospital. She has '6' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU'. Posts: 3,364 (54% Liked) Likes: 6,592

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  • Sep 10

    Yes, the gap in time since graduation without work experience could hurt your chances at getting a job. It could also hurt your ability to practice, as you would be taking a year long break from nursing practice and knowledge. Without experience to ingrain that knowledge, you're likely to forget quite a bit in that year, and struggle with your first nursing job far more than the average new grad.

    I echo the advice of previous posters. There are many options for learning Spanish- even advanced Spanish or medical Spanish, that don't require living in another country. Identify some programs/classes near you and seek out nursing positions that offer a schedule allowing you to work and learn Spanish. If you work at a hospital that serves a large Spanish-speaking community, that's great, but I would advise you against "practicing" Spanish with your patients. Many hospitals have a policy that only an approved medical interpreter may translate for patients.

  • Sep 5

    I suppose the other concern is that if you have a severe extravasation in the AC, you've compromised all IV sites distal to that AC. If a hand vein extravasates, you can still use veins above that site.

    Absolutely, frequent site assessments and brisk blood return are a must.

  • Sep 5

    They are my patients and they are kids. Yes, I will refer to them a patient as “my kid” when speaking to a doctor or coworker. Such as, “My kid in room 6 spiked a temp, could you order blood cultures?” or “My kids both needed new IVs this morning.” I’d never refer to them as “mine” when speaking to their parents, though.

  • Aug 28

    It depends on what kind of job you're looking for. Do you want to work for an EMR company doing training and education? Or do you want to work for a hospital building and designing the EMR system and consulting on other technology related issues? Either way your first step is to find a job in a hospital system (bigger systems will have more opportunities), get to know the electronic documentation system and meet people within the IT and informatics department who can help you network.

  • Aug 25

    It depends on what kind of job you're looking for. Do you want to work for an EMR company doing training and education? Or do you want to work for a hospital building and designing the EMR system and consulting on other technology related issues? Either way your first step is to find a job in a hospital system (bigger systems will have more opportunities), get to know the electronic documentation system and meet people within the IT and informatics department who can help you network.

  • Aug 25

    You're probably getting different answers because the answer is different for lobectomy and pneumonectomy.

    For a lobectomy or wedge resection, the patient can be turned on either side, and should be repositioned from side-back-side regularly. This facilitates ventilation and lung expansion.

    After a complete pneumonectomy the patient is placed supine or on the operative side only. The reason for this is because the mediastinum (connective tissue and membranes that separate the lungs) isn't held in place by lung tissue. Placing the patient on the non-operative side could cause the mediastinum to compress the remaining lung or push/pull the vena cava, interfering with blood flow.

    Source: Drain's Perianesthesia Nursing, A Critical Care Approach, 6th edition. 2013.

  • Aug 22

    #1, thank you for being clear, specific, and including your work and thought process when you posted this question.
    #2, unless the question specifically asks you to reconstitute or dilute the medication, I don't assume that I need to add additional volume. If both these questions were presented to me exactly as you worded them, I wouldn't add additional volume to either.

    If you have a question this ambiguous on your actual exam, just ask the instructor to clarify. As long as you have a good understanding of the process (and it seems that you do), I don't think you'll be faulted either way.

  • Aug 21

    #1, thank you for being clear, specific, and including your work and thought process when you posted this question.
    #2, unless the question specifically asks you to reconstitute or dilute the medication, I don't assume that I need to add additional volume. If both these questions were presented to me exactly as you worded them, I wouldn't add additional volume to either.

    If you have a question this ambiguous on your actual exam, just ask the instructor to clarify. As long as you have a good understanding of the process (and it seems that you do), I don't think you'll be faulted either way.

  • Aug 19

    I agree wholeheartedly with both posters. You stated you're in your second year of what is likely a 4 year program. This is the time where you learn the basics of assessment, pathophysiology, critical thinking, and basic interventions. The advanced skills and knowledge required for ED/Trauma nursing will come later.

  • Aug 19

    #1, thank you for being clear, specific, and including your work and thought process when you posted this question.
    #2, unless the question specifically asks you to reconstitute or dilute the medication, I don't assume that I need to add additional volume. If both these questions were presented to me exactly as you worded them, I wouldn't add additional volume to either.

    If you have a question this ambiguous on your actual exam, just ask the instructor to clarify. As long as you have a good understanding of the process (and it seems that you do), I don't think you'll be faulted either way.

  • Aug 18

    You're not alone. I routinely feel faint or pass out when I get blood drawn, get immunizations, sometimes even with my annual TB test, and there's no chance I could ever donate blood. And I'm not the only one of my colleagues who have the same problem. I've been a nurse for 6 years, given hundreds of injections and placed hundreds of IVs. There's no reason you can't be a nurse because you don't like needles.

  • Aug 17

    You're not alone. I routinely feel faint or pass out when I get blood drawn, get immunizations, sometimes even with my annual TB test, and there's no chance I could ever donate blood. And I'm not the only one of my colleagues who have the same problem. I've been a nurse for 6 years, given hundreds of injections and placed hundreds of IVs. There's no reason you can't be a nurse because you don't like needles.

  • Aug 17

    #1, thank you for being clear, specific, and including your work and thought process when you posted this question.
    #2, unless the question specifically asks you to reconstitute or dilute the medication, I don't assume that I need to add additional volume. If both these questions were presented to me exactly as you worded them, I wouldn't add additional volume to either.

    If you have a question this ambiguous on your actual exam, just ask the instructor to clarify. As long as you have a good understanding of the process (and it seems that you do), I don't think you'll be faulted either way.

  • Aug 12

    New grads are sometimes hired for PRN work. This is more common if the new grad already has clinical or tech experience on the unit in question. It's definitely easier to get experience working full time. Some hospitals will count your experience in hours instead of months.

    When you apply for positions, the job will specify the hours (full/part time or PRN) and the shift. So you would only apply for part time or PRN positions. That eliminates any question of hours during the interview. But as a new grad, you should apply for as many positions as you can and accept the best job you can get.

  • Aug 12

    I just had to post this in response to the dozens of posts I see from nursing students or new graduates that want to work in peds because "kids are so cute," and "I want to take care of babies," and "I don't want to change adult diapers."

    As anyone who has worked in pediatrics could tell you, peds nursing is not easier than adult nursing, and at times it is more difficult.

    In peds, you might be assigned 5 patients, just like on a med surg floor. But your patients can't all speak for themselves. They can't press their call button to tell you when they are in pain, can't breath well, or their IV site is burning. You have to constantly be alert for these, and many other problems because our patients can't report them.

    In peds, you have to care for the patient and the family. Some family members are great. Others are incredibly anxious, questioning everything you say and do and constantly asking you to check on little Jimmy because they are positive something is wrong. Other families are demanding. They think that because their child is in the hospital, so are they. They want meals, blankets, pillows, and expect you to supply them with Tylenol for their headaches and money for transportation home.

    In peds, everything is tiny. Those veins you have to stick on an adult? 1/4 the size on a young child. Those urethra's it's so hard to find when cathing little old ladies? Microscopic on a newborn baby girl.

    Peds nurses don't just have to know standard adult doses (650 mg of Tylenol), but we have to know mg/kg dosages as well. And we have to be able to calculate them quickly in order to catch a mistake in an order and prevent an unsafe dose.

    Giving medications? 95% of your adult population will be more than happy to swallow their pain pill, or all 20 of their medications in one gulp. In peds, you're trying to convince a stubborn three year old to open their mouth so you can get the syringe of medication in them. They cry and kick and fight and more times then not they end up with half the medication on them and half on you. Don't even try to convince a toddler that amoxicillin tastes like bubble gum. They know the difference.

    Finally, accidents in peds can be just as big and messy as adults. Spend three hours with a two year old with explosive diarrhea. Change the diaper 6 times, change the bed linen four times, change your scrubs once, and give the child three baths. Trust me, you'll be begging for an adult who can tell you when they need to use the commode, even if they do need help wiping.


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