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mariebailey, MSN, RN 10,218 Views

Joined Mar 2, '11. Posts: 1,101 (59% Liked) Likes: 2,006

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  • Jan 2

    If you are sure you will be continuing your education and go on to become Nurse Practitioner, some of your Direct Entry MSN courses will transfer. Also, it will not be necessary to obtain another Master's; you will only need to complete a post-master's certificate in your NP program. This means you will not need to write another thesis. The downside of the direct entry MSN program is that it is more expensive b/c it is grad school. Also, IMO, it is more challenging b/c you are studying at the graduate level. I did the direct entry MSN program; I only regret the student loan debt.

  • Dec 24 '16

    Just my gold necklaces, that's all.

  • Sep 24 '16

    I'm sorry you've gone through all of that. It is miserable when you have a legitimate disorder that affects your behavior, & people choose to assume your behavior is due to a lack of will power or a character flaw. These people are misinformed. Also, I know how it feels to hear, "You scored this on such & such standardized test, so your grades should be higher." Hearing stuff like that may have led you to develop unrealistic expectations of yourself. Try thinking of all the things you do right IN SPITE of your illness, & celebrate them. I hope it gets better for you though.

  • Sep 7 '16

    Quote from Kimynurse
    I failed my titter, retook the 3 and passed the second. Similar to MMR, had to take twice
    Re:the repeat MMR series: I may be talking to myself once again here, but I don't understand why employee health/infection control folks don't consider ACIP/CDC recommendations on these matters; it would perhaps be more cost-effective and mean less needlesticks for you all. You were probably immune to MMR. Does anyone else think the lack of uniformity with well-established, researched guidelines is a little asinine?

    "ACIP does not routinely recommend more than 2 doses of MMR vaccine. A negative serology after 2 documented doses probably represents a false negative (i.e., antibody titer is too low to detect with commercial tests). If a healthcare setting relies on post-vaccination testing to determine immunity, a negative serology can erroneously indicate that a HCW needs additional doses. Remember, ACIP does not recommend routine serologic testing after MMR vaccination"
    http://www.immunize.org/askexperts/experts_mmr.asp

  • Jul 22 '16

    Yes Drill Sergeant, but may I point out we aren't fighting the Vietcong with Gump?

  • Jul 22 '16

    I'm sorry you've gone through all of that. It is miserable when you have a legitimate disorder that affects your behavior, & people choose to assume your behavior is due to a lack of will power or a character flaw. These people are misinformed. Also, I know how it feels to hear, "You scored this on such & such standardized test, so your grades should be higher." Hearing stuff like that may have led you to develop unrealistic expectations of yourself. Try thinking of all the things you do right IN SPITE of your illness, & celebrate them. I hope it gets better for you though.

  • Apr 10 '16

    You all would die if you heard me try to pronounce glomerulus.

  • Mar 31 '16

    I think it's a great idea to have a release signed so you may communicate with the endocrinologist freely.

  • Mar 10 '16

    This may not be helpful, but here is my thought: I have not been there myself, but I see that you haven't received a response. I don't know what happened, but I do know that mistakes can be opportunities for growth. If this is true for you, that would be something valuable to communicate to a potential employer. I found an article by a nurse with a history of disciplinary action who was able to find employment. To sum up, disclose your history upfront/immediately (rather than waiting for them to ask) and explain what you have learned from the experience/how it will make you a better nurse. Read NurseWeek: Nurse, Interrupted: A portrait of how disciplinary action can tie you up in knots

  • Mar 7 '16

    A transfer from a psych unit arrived in the ICU after she fell, broke her arm, and was unarousable after orthopaedic surgery. This elderly woman eventually came around, but she had mania-induced psychosis. A cardiologist who was consulted visited her while I was in the room, & she asked the cardiologist if he could see the black cat spying on her in the vent above her. He said, "No ma'am, I don't see a cat anywhere." She said to the cardiologist, "Well, you're obviously stupid."



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