Latest Likes For mariebailey

Latest Likes For mariebailey

mariebailey, MSN, RN 9,308 Views

Joined Mar 2, '11. Posts: 1,101 (59% Liked) Likes: 2,002

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  • Jul 22

    Yes Drill Sergeant, but may I point out we aren't fighting the Vietcong with Gump?

  • Jul 22

    I'm sorry you've gone through all of that. It is miserable when you have a legitimate disorder that affects your behavior, & people choose to assume your behavior is due to a lack of will power or a character flaw. These people are misinformed. Also, I know how it feels to hear, "You scored this on such & such standardized test, so your grades should be higher." Hearing stuff like that may have led you to develop unrealistic expectations of yourself. Try thinking of all the things you do right IN SPITE of your illness, & celebrate them. I hope it gets better for you though.

  • Apr 10

    You all would die if you heard me try to pronounce glomerulus.

  • Mar 31

    I think it's a great idea to have a release signed so you may communicate with the endocrinologist freely.

  • Mar 10

    This may not be helpful, but here is my thought: I have not been there myself, but I see that you haven't received a response. I don't know what happened, but I do know that mistakes can be opportunities for growth. If this is true for you, that would be something valuable to communicate to a potential employer. I found an article by a nurse with a history of disciplinary action who was able to find employment. To sum up, disclose your history upfront/immediately (rather than waiting for them to ask) and explain what you have learned from the experience/how it will make you a better nurse. Read NurseWeek: Nurse, Interrupted: A portrait of how disciplinary action can tie you up in knots

  • Mar 7

    A transfer from a psych unit arrived in the ICU after she fell, broke her arm, and was unarousable after orthopaedic surgery. This elderly woman eventually came around, but she had mania-induced psychosis. A cardiologist who was consulted visited her while I was in the room, & she asked the cardiologist if he could see the black cat spying on her in the vent above her. He said, "No ma'am, I don't see a cat anywhere." She said to the cardiologist, "Well, you're obviously stupid."

  • Jan 1

    Why do we tie nursing to our identity so much? You are not obligated to be a nurse indefinitely; there are other career options. If you do want to remain in the field, I agree with the others; maybe a different environment or field of nursing will work out better for you. I know how you feel though. When you work hard, you want and deserve respect from you co-workers, superiors, the organization, and your patients - that's not asking much. I tried stomping my feet (figuratively) and protesting and demanding change and resisting giving into the status quo in the past, but it turns out one person can't change an entire organizational culture. I hope things change for you in a positive way. Advice from lessons learned: don't make an a#@ of yourself; maintain a positive & professional attitude & just move on when it's time.

  • Dec 24 '15

    I work 'round the clock year after year
    With little thanks & praise
    Can you imagine such ingratitude
    And the nurse had one humorous gaze

  • Oct 15 '15

    I think you have every right to be irritated. Nurses are human, but we should keep it professional.

  • Oct 4 '15

    I think disclosing the minimum amount of info necessary (i.e., leave out patient identifiers) to get your point across is ideal:
    Hallway conversations. Talking about patient information in public places is problematic. Although HIPAA does not address this problem specifically, its privacy principles reinforce the professional commitment to use care in such situations to avoid unintentional disclosure of information. Talking in elevators, discussing a case over lunch, discussing a difficult situation with friends over dinner — all of these situations raise the possibility that a client’s protected health information will be revealed inappropriately. Certainly, professionals may discuss, and should discuss, difficult situations in a healthy atmosphere of learning and problem solving. Again, the “minimum necessary” rule will help to guide these discussions. Remembering to delete identifying information when possible, exchanging only enough information to further the discussion, and holding such conversations away from busy public places will improve the ability to protect patient confidentiality.” HIPAA and Confidentiality | CE513 > Page 2

  • Sep 15 '15

    People, hear me out. I cannot control what I wear to work. I watch what I say. Let me have this one freedom of keeping extremely short gel nails covered with the color of my choice while at work. P.S. It's plum this week, & I love 'em!

  • Aug 26 '15

    A transfer from a psych unit arrived in the ICU after she fell, broke her arm, and was unarousable after orthopaedic surgery. This elderly woman eventually came around, but she had mania-induced psychosis. A cardiologist who was consulted visited her while I was in the room, & she asked the cardiologist if he could see the black cat spying on her in the vent above her. He said, "No ma'am, I don't see a cat anywhere." She said to the cardiologist, "Well, you're obviously stupid."

  • Aug 25 '15

    A transfer from a psych unit arrived in the ICU after she fell, broke her arm, and was unarousable after orthopaedic surgery. This elderly woman eventually came around, but she had mania-induced psychosis. A cardiologist who was consulted visited her while I was in the room, & she asked the cardiologist if he could see the black cat spying on her in the vent above her. He said, "No ma'am, I don't see a cat anywhere." She said to the cardiologist, "Well, you're obviously stupid."



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