Latest Comments by keepleaRNing

keepleaRNing 1,025 Views

Joined Feb 10, '11. Posts: 14 (64% Liked) Likes: 17

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  • 2
    kids and Despareux like this.

    While I love & support my fellow nurses, I wonder, well what rns are going to care for the poor patients in the hospital? Someone has to do it.

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    gaylarn4 and Caffeine_IV like this.

    I have left a job, only to return a few months later. I just stopped by one day on the weekend, while management was not in. I chatted with some nurses (even the one whom had filled my old position) about openings and such. I was encouraged to call during the week. Well, turns out I did not have to...management found out about my "visit", called me, and offered me back. I went back, stayed a while, and left to try another field. And, I got an "come back, ok?" with the last resignation. Untie strings, but do not sever them. Ask for your job back.

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    [quote=keepleaRNing;5461445]Deen, those people done you a favor by firing you...that facility sounds like an unfair one. I have worked in about 5 different rehab/nursing homes, and, I have to tell ya...I can't stand them (facilities). Too much work, too many patients assigned to one nurse (my last 11p-7a job gave me 50 pts each night, and on occasion, 85 pts to care for!), and hardly enough CENAs @ times. But, it is always rewarding to help another human being, regardless. Anyway, you sound like someone with a spine, and you need that in nursing. As far as clearing your name: when you do look for another job, they will most likely inquire about your reason for separation. Be honest about what happened, but short and sweet, something like, "I was fired due to some untrue things said which supposedly came from a non-verbal resident, but there were witnesses, and I won my appeal for my unemployment". Of course they will ask what happened. Keep that short and sweet, do NOT slaughter your former bosses in front of new potential ones. Remain positive and enthusiastic about nursing, and last but not least, exuberate confidence @ future interviews....You will be fine![Of course, they did not do you a favor by firing you unjustly...but you can move forward now]

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    lindarn, melmarie23, sweetnurse63, and 1 other like this.

    Deen, those people done you a favor by firing you...that facility sounds like an unfair one. I have worked in about 5 different rehab/nursing homes, and, I have to tell ya...I can't stand them (facilities). Too much work, too many patients assigned to one nurse (my last 11p-7a job gave me 50 pts each night, and on occasion, 85 pts to care for!), and hardly enough CENAs @ times. But, it is always rewarding to help another human being, regardless. Anyway, you sound like someone with a spine, and you need that in nursing. As far as clearing your name: when you do look for another job, they will most likely inquire about your reason for separation. Be honest about what happened, but short and sweet, something like, "I was fired due to some untrue things said which supposedly came from a non-verbal resident, but there were witnesses, and I won my appeal for my unemployment". Of course they will ask what happened. Keep that short and sweet, do NOT slaughter your former bosses in front of new potential ones. Remain positive and enthusiastic about nursing, and last but not least, exuberate confidence @ future interviews....You will be fine!

  • 3

    I have a friend who lost her husband in a plane crash during the nursing program, and she also had to sit out and repeat a med surg class when it became available again. But she endured, & she is still pressing on. So, I'm saying that, while some of us may have diffferent circumstances as to why we have to repeat some courses, we just have to push on and move forward. You be prayerful, and go get 'em in January!

  • 0

    Some midnight aides can be very lazy, and unfortunately, you will discover this. However, that doesn't mean that just because an aide is sleepy constitutes laziness. I have witnessed some very fatigued aides work their behinds off. I have also seen other NAs park overbed tables near the residents' doors, put their heads down, and go right to sleep. I am not suggesting that you micro manage, but do ENFORCE your stance in the no sleeping policy from the BEGINNING of your starting out, "I know that we all will feel like just dropping and going to sleep @ some point during the shift, I know it can be tough to stay awake. But I ABSOLUTELY cannot allow anyone to do that during our shift...." Midnights are generally more laid back, but still, it is not a time to catch up on sleep. That usually puts the patient in danger, the aide's job and the nurse's job on the line. P.S.= other people from different departments rat out nursing staff when they see them sleeping too, and all h@?! breaks forth! Be friendly, be down to earth, but be firm, and you will be fine! All the best to you

  • 1
    cdc_56 likes this.

    You sound like a very intelligient and smart person, with good blood in you from a family of hard-working people! DO NOT give up on your dreams...turn your stumbling blocks into stepping stones and keep stepping...before you know it, you will be there. God bless ya

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    @ miller: First of all, you were darn brave to take on an ER position as a new grad, so much love to ya! You will continue to gain experience with each job that you get. Your assessment skills will grow, becoming better and better, and that is a daily process. So it's curtains for the first job, who cares. You can get other jobs, so please do not be discouraged! I have found that with every job I have held, there is never an adequate length of training, although most ALL nurse jobs tend to boast that there is! So baby, buck up, go for the next job wherever that may be, and do be honest about the reason for the separation without slamming the former employer. Sell yourself without being cocky; let them know that you ARE competent (you are),and let future employers know that you are willing to learn. Don't launch into the drama about the taddlings from other staff; these employers are very well aware of this behavior. I hope this encourages you...and welcome to nursing! You'll be all right!

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    [quote=mustangsheba;80630]One of the things that makes nursing so compelling is it's diversity. I think it's perfectly fine to change jobs as long as one isn't being fired. I try to stay a year unless there's abuse, then I'm outta there. Most of my jobs have been good, some great, but my dearest love is home health. [My own experience as a home health nurse has been that you tend to feel genuinely appreciated by patients and families, minus all the drama/politics that most facilities tend to offer,whether intentional or not/quote]

  • 1
    carolmaccas66 likes this.

    Quote from VRN-RN
    Rotfl and smh with the nitro being used as handcream
    Yucky!

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    carolmaccas66 likes this.

    uh oh..I think I posted a reply in the wrong spot, but what I meant to say was ...dat's NOT cool about the recapping needles...

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    carolmaccas66 likes this.

    Quote from lovingtheunloved
    I'm a CNA in LTC. I would NEVER EVER put my hands on a medication, especially a narcotic. It is out of a CNA's scope of practice. What nurse would put herself at risk like that? Sheesh. And obviously, in this situation, they DID have the time to sit with the resident for 10 minutes, since the CNA was chilling at the station with the newspaper.

    As far as things that freak me out, I'm sure most of you have seen this, but I work with a nurse who, for the past 30 years, has recapped needles with her teeth. I shudder.
    ok, dat's NOT cool...!!



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