Content That rnccf2007 Likes

Content That rnccf2007 Likes

rnccf2007 2,818 Views

Joined Jan 10, '11. Posts: 153 (57% Liked) Likes: 271

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  • Apr 15

    Yeah... I don't think he's being controlling. I think he just doesn't want her to get in trouble at work. Which is understandable! My boyfriend is the same way. He's always like... I'm not gonna get you in trouble right?! I would just assure him that no... you will not get in trouble and that you will be careful. The bad thing about social media is that it can come back to bite you in the butt professionally, so you have to be mindful about what you share. Maybe he would feel better if you let him read a few of your posts before you post them and explain how its okay to post. Some people just need to be reassured.

  • Apr 15

    Quote from springchick1
    You are on an anonymous forum. People are going to share their thoughts and opinions. If you are only looking for sympathy, you may be in the wrong place. People are going to tell it like it is.
    Its people like you that is the reason people don't comment or post. I wonder would people tell it like it is if they were not anonymously behind a keyboard. And I absolutely was not looking for sympathy but experiences and insightful comments not unsolicited opinions. I didn't think this post would even get looked at twice honestly but thank you to all that left encouraging words, past experiences and insightful comments.

  • Apr 1

    I know this topic has been discussed ad nauseum but wanted to add my story to help those who have a record who are thinking about nursing school or are going to apply for a license. This has been my experience with the Oregon BON so I can't vouch for any other state but I would think they all have similar standards.

    I have 4 DUIs in my background at various points in my life. I knew before I even started nursing school that I would have an uphill battle and here are some of the lessons I've learned:

    1. You CAN get a license, but you are almost guaranteed a license on probation and participation in the monitoring program. Accept it and be grateful for the opportunity to practice at all.
    2. You need to have at least 2 years of continuous, documented sobriety...this means proof of treatment, support groups, random U/As.
    3. You have to appear before the board and state your case. This is your opportunity to tell your story...what happened, what you've done to change your life, and how you plan on maintaining your sobriety. Depending on their schedule, it could take up to 3 months from the time you take your NCLEX to actually get a license in hand, so have an employment backup plan.
    4. You actually have to change!! You must admit you have a problem and get help...you can't just pretend that you've changed and then go back to living your life the same way...in the end you WILL get caught and all your hard work will go down the drain.

    Here's the bottom line...

    People make mistakes. People have addiction problems. People can and do change.

    Getting your license is in your hands, you just have to put the work into it and accept that you have a harder battle to face than your peers without criminal records. Maybe you don't think its fair because you've changed but that's life...you pay the price for your mistakes but they don't need to define you. Here's my advice to current or future nursing students:

    1. If you have ANY DUIs/drug offenses you probably had to go to a treatment program. Make sure to get the paperwork from that facility and let them know you are planning on applying for a license. Most treatment centers have experience working with state boards and understand what paperwork is needed.

    2. Contact a treatment facility and sign up for voluntary U/As to provide objective data that you are continuously sober. Your sob story is not going to be enough, remember, we are nurses, we use objective and subjective data to make decisions.

    3. Participate in support groups and keep a record of your attendance.

    4. Get a sponsor or psychologist who can attest to your progress. Your word means nothing to the board so start gathering respected people who can vouch for your change.

    5. Go online to your board of nursing and look for the discipline records...read them...get an idea of how your board of nursing deals with people in this or similar situations. I guarantee you will find someone who's situation is similar to yours if you look hard enough. If they made a mistake during their hearing, learn from it and start building your case now.

    6. Be patient, humble, and accepting of your situation. Sometimes I feel like I'm being punished for something that someone else did because I've been in recovery and sober for over 2 years now and that lifestyle seems like a bad dream...but that's just one chapter in the story of my life, it does not define me. And I have a compassion for people with addiction issues that I know some of my cohorts don't have.

    7. Contact the board at least a year before you graduate and talk to the background compliance officer and ask "what can I do in the next year to help my case?" They will give you the right advice and it looks good for you to be proactive...remember, they are the same people who decide whether or not you need to go before the board so if they know you are transparent and willing to do what it takes, it looks good for your case. They can also give you an idea of when your case will be heard based on the board meeting schedule.

    Last but not least, don't give up. If nursing is what you want to do with your life, then don't let anything or anyone get in your way. I read alot of posts about how "you'll never get a job" and "people with addiction pasts shouldn't be nurses anyway." There are always negative people out there who will try and convince you that you're worthless or damaged because of what you did...but I'm here to tell you that there are places that will hire you (think detox nursing, mental health nursing) that will accept you as you are and in fact will respect you for having gone through the process of recovery. Accept the fact that unless you have close contacts at a local hospital, you may not be able to work there right away...work somewhere else for a few years, get through the monitoring program and then apply for those hospital jobs.

    I hope this helps anyone else out there who is going through this. When I first started this journey, all I read on these message threads was negative, negative, negative and I just want to let people know that there is hope and you can achieve your goals if you have the right tools and the determination.

    Best of luck to all!!

  • Mar 31

    You are giving up too quickly. You haven't even graduated yet! Once you graduate and pass the NCLEX, you may find yourself with more job options. Not everyone secures a job 2 months before graduation. My hospital isn't even interviewing yet!

    As for the fiance who will leave you if he doesn't approve of your job ... Unless he is willing to pay your debts, then he needs to be supportive of you while you do whatever you need to do to pay them off yourself. If he can't do that, he is a loser and you should dump him. He is bringing you down when he should be building you up. If you want to be a nurse, then don't quit before you have even graduated. And don't stay with anyone who tears you down.

  • Mar 31

    I worked at a hospital once where a medical resident (a RESIDENT!) visiting a patient at bedside put my patient on a bedpan at her request. She came to the nurse's station (where I was busy charting) to tell me that she did that. This was the first time a doctor had ever done anything like this in my experience, so I was a bit shocked. She shrugged it off as it not being a big deal, but just wanted to let me know so that I was aware when the patient was done. That doctor earned my highest respect from that day on. She was quite awesome in all respects. Oh how I hated the day she left for another rotation

    But I have also had frustrations with these moments you describe, where personnel take MORE time to find a nurse to perform a menial task that could have been done quicker doing it themselves. And case managers who now think they are above floor RN status and dont need to touch patients anymore, I really resent this. What is wrong with doing a blood pressure yourself? Arent you still a licensed RN?

    BTW, there are some days when patients take me to the point where I start thinking about becoming a flight attendant, because it is exactly how I sometimes feel. But just when I am convinced that I should go that route, another patient experience reminds me that nursing is truly where I am meant to be.

  • Mar 31

    Quote from nynursey_
    And I'm sorry I didn't clarify before hand. But what I was referring to above was the snarky, passive aggressive post clearly aimed at me.
    You are under no obligation to clarify acronyms. This is a fun forum not a piece of official documentation or an assignment for college. I'm from the UK, I just google all the stuff I don't understand. All the members of this forum can obviously use the internet and it doesn't take long.

    Regarding the OP, I would also like to ban the phrase. If there were enough RN's to do all the tasks it would be more tolerable but there aren't and it isn't.

  • Mar 31

    Quote from Pixie.RN
    I literally had to push a doctor's chair aside to reach the phone that was right next to him so I could page the hospitalist per his request. After I hung up I asked him if his arms were broken. Lol. I was only half serious! He's a good friend but he has it in his head that if he pages his own consultants that somehow his job scope will creep further and further into apparently menial tasks that aren't worthy of his attention. Meanwhile another physician who has been an ED doc for 30+ years somehow manages to page all his specialists all by himself. Mind boggling!
    We have a doc who, when he's sitting at the desk doing notes and such, will answer our phone if we're all tied doing stuff as we don't have a dedicated unit secretary. If the person being asked for isn't in the room at the moment he'll take down messages or transfer calls and the whole enchilada. He's a better secretary than I was when I was one I think! And I don't mean that in a demeaning way.

  • Mar 31

    Quote from raptorfem
    I agree with what many have said beforehand, the attitude of "I NEED THE NURSE" is often a pain and a waste of valuable time and effort. We are lucky to have a few HUCs (unit secretary) who are very proactive and IF the phones are not ringing off the hook they are happy to come find the nurse, check about the diet order, and bring a cup of ice/water/whatever. As for blanket adjustments and the million other little requests, of course I will help if I have time, but not always. If someone down the hall is having 10/10 uncontrolled postop pain, and down in another room an NG needs to placed for nausea/vomiting...I may (politely but briskly) ask you to put your call bell on and the nurse's aide will be able to help you quite soon. And I'm not above toileting people or going for a walk, but again it all depends on the time available and what's left on my to do list. If I just got a call about someone who is short of breath in another room, or even if I just have three TPN bags that still need to be hung...you may have to wait a few minutes. But agree with other posters that the best scenario is good teamwork. AND ADEQUATE STAFFING, WITH WHICH THIS WOULD BE A MOOT POINT MUCH OF THE TIME! :-)
    I sincerely believe this. I'm not sure why adequate staffing is such a foreign concept to hospital administration. More people to attend to the needs of the patients would equate to better survey scores, thus increasing reimbursement, and allowing more profit for the hospital to fix the cost of a surge in employees. But, sadly, the attitude remains "do more with less," and nurses happen to be on the receiving end of the assignment of new/more responsibilities. Perfect example: it used to be a physician's job to complete the medication reconciliation on admission as there are often times they are more familiar with certain medications and doses that may appear questionable to the bedside nurse. From there, they can simply sign the list and order all home medications at the time of admission. Starting two months ago, bedside nurses became responsible for obtaining all the patient's medication information and verifying a home pharmacy.

    Yes, please. Let's just add another responsibility to the nurse who already faces many dilemmas when admitting a new patient and balancing her patient load.

  • Mar 31

    I agree with what many have said beforehand, the attitude of "I NEED THE NURSE" is often a pain and a waste of valuable time and effort. We are lucky to have a few HUCs (unit secretary) who are very proactive and IF the phones are not ringing off the hook they are happy to come find the nurse, check about the diet order, and bring a cup of ice/water/whatever. As for blanket adjustments and the million other little requests, of course I will help if I have time, but not always. If someone down the hall is having 10/10 uncontrolled postop pain, and down in another room an NG needs to placed for nausea/vomiting...I may (politely but briskly) ask you to put your call bell on and the nurse's aide will be able to help you quite soon. And I'm not above toileting people or going for a walk, but again it all depends on the time available and what's left on my to do list. If I just got a call about someone who is short of breath in another room, or even if I just have three TPN bags that still need to be hung...you may have to wait a few minutes. But agree with other posters that the best scenario is good teamwork. AND ADEQUATE STAFFING, WITH WHICH THIS WOULD BE A MOOT POINT MUCH OF THE TIME! :-)

  • Mar 31

    Requests I get that do not require an RN.... Patient wants a new blanket, other blanket has a stain from dinner.. Patient would like gown tie loosened. Patient dropped remote for TV, patient family member wants to know when doctor will be here, patient sock slid down, patients roommate (not my pt, not my name on board) has a question. Patient with diet orders clearly written on board with today's date would like crackers, patient who has urinal and no order for urine on care board would like it emptied. patient pillow needs readjusted because patient says it's too flat. Transport needs assistance with walky talky pt on no iv lines or anything, doc wants to know what home dose of med is from pharmacy, he has the number for you, pt family member wants a chair/cot/fan/blanket /water, doc wants patients last weight (it's in the chart on the front page of the patient's stuff) rt is out of duonebs and needs pharmacy to restock pyxis (so call them yourself) can't find call light (we have voice calls, tell pt they're holding it..) blanket not soft enough, bed needs raised up for comfort (see those buttons that a two year old could figure out?) pt wants to have a cigarette but has no lighter (I kid you not haha). Pt family member xyz called and wants info (pt listed as private and no info release on header of chart) pt wants to know what the cafeteria is serving, he doesn't like his menu. Can patient have pain meds? From case manager nurse who was in room with me 8 minutes ago when I was giving pain meds and can see the updated pain meds schedule on care board). Patient has gas and said farts smell (okay... I'm glad I have to walk to his/her room to close out request electronically for nothing and experience that)... Toilet clogged in walky talky pts room or guest bathroom... (seriously call maintenance, I don't care seriously, and I'm not a plumber) helicopter noise from lifeflight is too loud outside. Friend is homeless, can he stay here too? Patient's watch died, please come look at it. Patient's (600 lbs) butt itches (I'll do a lot of things for a patient, but.. No.. Sorry.. Just no.) Visitor would like nail file. Ice water requested is too cold. Visitors would like to know of best restaurants in area (granted, my hospice, long stay patients families may ask me about that while they're there but this was a walky talky pt and family who really didn't need to be there and they paged me for this 6 times in 8 minutes while I was placing an NG tube down the hall. Patient visitor requests fork from cafeteria. Patient wants nurse, says he is bored.... Sorry. Could go on and on. Dumb requests abound. I don't usually mind but when I get 40 stupid pages in an hour I lose it a bit lol.

  • Mar 31

    Quote from HDChopefulRT
    I feel you wouldnt complain and start a post if you cared .I know nursing is a very fast paced job but that's why it requires you to multi task. Have a great day.
    LoL only a non nurse would say something so patronizing and dead wrong. If someone is complaining about problems, they care a lot. If someone cares little or not at all they wouldn't be bothered to worry or stress.

  • Mar 31

    Quote from friggasdistaff
    I wonder if the poster is fully aware of what a HUC actually does. When you expect me to 'take care' of the patient's 'fluffier' needs, I am missing the call from the specialist who I've paged three times. I can't get your patient a Ginger Ale and prepare a patient for transport or facilitate an admission. I am more than happy to help out in any way I can, but not when I am performing tasks that I can't delegate or are time sensitive. Just like an RN there are things that I do that can't be delegated to other team members.
    As to your frustration over the phrase 'I'll get your Nurse' most people say that because we don't know who will be available to assist the patient. It may be a CNA , or a Tech, or an RN. We don't have the luxury of time to explain that this is a task that can be delegated to another team member and we will let that member of the care team know. On my unit I always try to suss out what a patient needs when they ask for a nurse, so I can make the best use of the team's time, but some patient's just want 'their nurse' and that's their right.
    At my facility, unit clerks do not page physicians. That task falls to the person who needs to get in touch with said physician. As for answering the phones in general, I'm more irked about the fact that the unit clerk will take a break at their convenience, not at the convenience of the staff, leaving the nurses and PCAs to answer the phones and call lights. Someone else can get the phone. It's not exclusive to the ASA. Someone else is not going to start a blood transfusion. That's exclusive to me.

    If you aren't sure which person is going to respond, a simple "I'll send someone down for you," is more appropriate. When unit clerks begin allowing patients to summon the nurse to the room, and the nurse then fetches things, and the patient associates the nurse as the ONLY person who can do that.

    Yes, you're correct, a patient is entitled to request to speak to their nurse, and I don't mind attending to those calls. But those instances are rare.

    I truly do appreciate each member of the healthcare team, but it really does get old to constantly be the 'go to' or 'fall guy' for absolutely EVERYTHING.

  • Mar 31

    Quote from marylou5
    It's called team work!! It's called common sense!! Yes, there are levels of care assigned to each discipline but we all know that there are areas that overlap. If I'm in a room observing/conversing with a patient why not multitask?? Make the unmade bed the aide didn't get to.....or clean up an accident the patient had, or give a drink, or take to the bathroom to avoid the accident etc etc etc.
    Quite often it takes more time to find the person responsible than it does to do it yourself! You are already there! I insist on absolute team work...that every pt is everyone's responsibility..if you see a light you answer it..take care of the call or find the appropriate person..that's everyone's job including mine!! If you pitch in when possible, you gain the respect of all disciplines because you care more about patient care, than whose job it is! When they notice you are right out straight, they pitch in and just do! For example a CNA told me she restocked the emergency cart, got a new O2 tank, tubing etc so I would just have to check it..... not her job! Another CNA re-stocked the top of my med cart with supplies, ice water and juices..and replenished supplies on the RX cart....not her job! It was a 'crisis' day and they all stepped up. Team work makes every day easier for everyone.....Granted the lower level disciplines, mostly, can't do your job.... but they can make your job easier, if you are not 'too good' to pitch in and do 'their' job when the opportunity and time presents.
    See? There's the "too good" attitude. What about the tasks only the nurse can do? And "too good" and race and religion and gender and political views and anything else doesn't even begin to factor in? If I am making beds, who will give my meds? Do my charting, my admissions, transfers, and discharges? Who will get orders from doctors? Who will do all of my work? You know who? Me, myself, and I. And the aides will do theirs because I won't, can't, don't have time. They get breaks, I don't, but I should do their work? Not.

  • Mar 31

    Quote from buddiage
    How did you get into nursing school? Did they not do a background check with that? I'm sure every nursing school does.

    This would be an excellent opportunity for you to explain your "new" lifestyle. You might as well bring it up the next job interview, if nursing has improved your life, given you opportunity, then state that.

    I don't know the legalities of it, but I'd be VERY cautious with someone who did that too. Can you see the reservations someone might have hiring you? Can they trust you not to take what is not lawfully yours?

    You are just going to have to go "there" on your next interview and explain yourself.

    Some of us have had bumpy beginnings into adulthood, but we managed to see the light and be better for it- you might have to prove that you value morality and have high ethical values, and you'd never return to that type of decision making.
    I'm a bit uncomfortable with the OP being addressed like this. I'm not sure why, because I'm such a goody-two-shoes. I've never even had a speeding ticket, let alone any other sort of trouble with the legal system.

    It just seems to me that sometimes we are too harsh with those who have had brushes with the law. How do we expect others to pick themselves up out of bad choices if we constantly kick them down? I know that using someone else's credit card is bad, it makes me wince. But still, all of us could be driven to do bad things that we would never imagine given extreme circumstances.

    Anyway, I am sorry I am rambling. To the OP, hold your head high. I think you do need to disclose this to prospective employers. I'd just tell what the charge was matter of factly and explain that it was an abheration regarding your behavior, a mistake that you feel badly about, and you completed your community service. Then I'd launch quickly into your academic achievements, strengths, what you may offer the hospital, etc. Hold your head high. Yes, your charge is a blip on the radar that causes concern, but it doesn't need to define you regarding employment.

  • Jun 15 '15

    ZERO TOLERANCE. write it up in the chart and do an incident report. refuse to be in the same room with this person unless someone else it there. tell them their behavior will not be tolerated.


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