Latest Likes For rnccf2007

Latest Likes For rnccf2007

rnccf2007 (2,431 Views)

Joined Jan 10, '11. Posts: 147 (56% Liked) Likes: 255

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  • Nov 23 '15

    Quote from SneakySnake
    I said- "resident has bruising on arm and hip because they have been scratching"
    Other nurse said- "It looks ecchymotic to me, not bruised....just my opinion"

    I thought ecchymosis was bruising? Can anyone offer some clarification on this?
    Sounds like you have a co-worker from hell that we all have (had) to deal with. Where I come from, eccchymosis simply means bruising. Early in my nursing career (hasn't been too long) I worked with an LPN who sounds like your co-worker. She reviewed and critisized all of my nursing assessments. I am can be silly at times, so I started writing big words for my assessments. No generalized edema for me... "anasarca" , no reddened spots that were not a stage I but "blanchable erythema," etc. She stopped her critisim shortly after. Kind of backfired on me, because now I always document this way. LOL. Thankfully, I don't talk to my patients or co-workers that way. So If you ever get a chance, tell you co-worker..."looks like blanchable erythema to me not a reddened area, etc." Hope you get my point.

  • Nov 20 '15

    Sorry, but the truth. Not many people would work under such circumstances and still have empathy and compassion for others. My patients generally love me and a passion of mine is to always give them a heads up---meds, new orders, procedures,etc. I sometimes cry on my way home from work, because I can't provide the best care possible related to staffing at my hospital. Also work HHC and clients always request me to come back. My own health is suffering. The public needs to know the truth (and most of them do...patients are not stupid). Sorry, but I have an issue with someone who is not in the healthcare profession (and it is all big money now) billing doctors as the money makers. Yes...they are...but we are the gatekeepers...and any nurse worth their salt knows this. I do not feel that I have to apologize for an incompetent nurse.

  • Jul 8 '15

    I have nine years of nursing experience and have been an agency nurse for almost two years. The first thing that I recommend is to thoroughly check out the various nursing agencies in your area and find out what they have to offer such as benefits, pay scale, etc. For example, pay scale... At one hospital I worked at I talked to another nurse (doing the same job I was) working for a different agency and found out that she was making almost $5 less an hour than I was. She then quickly switched to my agency! Benefits...some offer medical benefits, some do not and this can depend if you work on a contract or prn. As far as extra money... consider no pto, no vacation pay, no short-term or long-term disability insurance, have to pay for your own BLS and ACLS classes, no tuition reimbursement, etc. So, in the end it may not be extra money. Flexibility in scheduling is another thing to consider. Remember, you will usually work at facilities to provide gaps in regular staffing. I have talked to and worked with nurses who have been agency nurses for many years. At one time, (at least in my area---Akron/Cleveland/Youngstown, OH) you could basically pick and choose when you wanted to work. Not always the case these days, although there is still some flexibility (but then again this is the same if you are an employee, because many facilities have self-scheduling).

    Also, r/t filling in the gaps. If doing prn, you will be the first nurse to be cancelled r/t census and staffing. When I first started doing agency, I worked for only one facility and was rarely cancelled. Then census went down, and I was sometimes going two weeks without working. So, I started working for multiple facilities through my agency. And being unsure if you are going to work that day sucks...getting that call that you are cancelled two hours before you start work. However, if you take a contract, you are basically guaranteed your hours, which I prefer.

    You wrote, "What is it really like walking into a floor you've never worked and expected to start work?" To be honest, the first time that I did it was scary. I was told to come in an hour early to learn the computer system and acclimate myself to the environment. Well, got there and couldn't get into the computer system...when they finally got me in two hours later, I had to take care of my patients and learn the computer system on my own. So, another thing to check out is what kind or orientation you will get at the facilities you will work in.

  • May 28 '15

    'Is it feasible to initiate a "no visitor" policy between 6-8? Allowing for report to be given and maintain privacy. The double occupancy beds is a tricky thing. When I use to have to deal with semi-private I would do report at the door and then we would go in and introduce and check things quickly."

    Thank you for your comment. I think that a "no visitor policy" between shift change would be great. Unfortunately, with the open visitation policies that seem to exist in may hospitals today, this may be a challenge. Also, just to clarify, we are expected to give report directly at the bedside (we are not just quickly checking things and introducing the on-coming nurse to the patient, which is a practice that I totally agree with r/t continuity of patient care)...while the Nurse Manager or members of Quality Control listen at the doorway.

    "Things like HIV status should be on your handover sheet, medical staff round and have no issue discussing pt status in a shared room. Sensitive issues should be dealt with in a sensitive manner but seriously is the pt room mate going to be concerned about the status of his IV cannula?"

    [FONT=Open Sans, verdana, sans-serif][COLOR=#000000]Another clarification. The hand-off sheet is completed at the bedside by the on-coming nurse as you give report. We are not talking about the status of an IV line! I guess that bedside reporting can be a good thing if it is done correctly. If not, I see some major issues occurring in the future. And...just because something is legal...it does not make it ethical.[/COLOR][/FONT]

  • May 22 '15

    Lol, sorry for the typo!

  • May 18 '15

    And your comment "he was a huge money make for the hospital" totally offends me. We may not be huge money makers but we are the very people who save lives...all we ask is your health.

  • May 18 '15

    Also, Anonymus, what kind of job do you do? Do you work 12-15+ hours with no (I mean no) breaks? Without pay? No food, no water. So you had a bad experience with a nurse. The majority of us work very hard because we are dedicated to people at our own expense. When the public starts thinking that we are maids and waiters ("get me my coffee", "I need a salad")...they forget that we are professionals with college educations...we can save your life... Give us our due respect.

  • May 18 '15

    Just out of curiosity, why are you a member of this website? Are you monitoring your doctor, pharmacist, mechanic? Why monitor only the nurse?

  • May 14 '15
  • May 14 '15

    Just out of curiosity, why are you a member of this website? Are you monitoring your doctor, pharmacist, mechanic? Why monitor only the nurse?

  • May 13 '15

    Just out of curiosity, why are you a member of this website? Are you monitoring your doctor, pharmacist, mechanic? Why monitor only the nurse?

  • May 13 '15

    Just out of curiosity, why are you a member of this website? Are you monitoring your doctor, pharmacist, mechanic? Why monitor only the nurse?

  • May 13 '15

    Sorry, still just curious. Why are you on a nursing blog site?

  • May 13 '15

    Curious,

    After 5 years, why are you now voicing your complaints!

  • May 13 '15

    Just out of curiosity, why are you a member of this website? Are you monitoring your doctor, pharmacist, mechanic? Why monitor only the nurse?


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