Latest Likes For rnccf2007

Latest Likes For rnccf2007

rnccf2007 3,273 Views

Joined Jan 10, '11. Posts: 199 (52% Liked) Likes: 302

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  • Jul 31

    LOL, there are no easy RN-BSN programs...or any nursing programs that are easy. My RN-BSN was on-line, and I am assuming that yours is too. I had to write papers and posts galore...and APA format accounted for a good portion of the grades. My suggestion to you is to buy the APA Manual and keep it by your side as a "bible" when writing.

  • Jul 19

    Quote from TriciaJ
    You must have had some sort of orientation to your unit. No good asking us, because hospitals use different brands of equipment which require different ways to do things. So just ask someone where you work. You might feel stupid having to ask (we have all been there). But the really stupid person is the one who doesn't ask, just tries to wing it. It's hard for us to help you when we don't know what kind of IV tubing you are using. So just find someone who looks receptive, and ASK.
    To OP and all new nurses...the scariest nurses are the ones who don't ask questions when they are unsure of what they are doing. I remember how hard it was for me, as a brand-new nurse, to ask questions; oftentimes because some nurses can just be plain mean, especially to new nurses. But, I always asked questions...even if I knew I would have to endure snarkasim (yes know it is not a word). I still bounce questions off other nurses and they do the same with me....nobody can know everything. Think about this...why do docs consult other docs?' My best advice is to take a good look around your unit...and you will get the feel for other nurses who (don't forget where they started from) and will love to educate you. And...don't forget when you become an experienced nurse to pass it on. BTW, saline lock (aka hep lock) means the IV or central line has no fluids running through it. Caps and tubing vary by facility.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from rnccf2007
    You know you have been a nurse too long, when one of parents deck you and you can't get up off the floor.
    LO, sorry, meant patients.

  • Jul 18

    You know you have been a nurse too long, when one of parents deck you and you can't get up off the floor.

  • Jul 18

    When you have heard about this phenomenon; but now you actually hear calls lights, tele monitors, IV pump beeps, bed alarms, vent monitors, etc...when your alarm clock goes off.

  • Jul 18

    When you fixate on people's veins when standing at the checkout line at a store.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from TriciaJ
    You must have had some sort of orientation to your unit. No good asking us, because hospitals use different brands of equipment which require different ways to do things. So just ask someone where you work. You might feel stupid having to ask (we have all been there). But the really stupid person is the one who doesn't ask, just tries to wing it. It's hard for us to help you when we don't know what kind of IV tubing you are using. So just find someone who looks receptive, and ASK.
    To OP and all new nurses...the scariest nurses are the ones who don't ask questions when they are unsure of what they are doing. I remember how hard it was for me, as a brand-new nurse, to ask questions; oftentimes because some nurses can just be plain mean, especially to new nurses. But, I always asked questions...even if I knew I would have to endure snarkasim (yes know it is not a word). I still bounce questions off other nurses and they do the same with me....nobody can know everything. Think about this...why do docs consult other docs?' My best advice is to take a good look around your unit...and you will get the feel for other nurses who (don't forget where they started from) and will love to educate you. And...don't forget when you become an experienced nurse to pass it on. BTW, saline lock (aka hep lock) means the IV or central line has no fluids running through it. Caps and tubing vary by facility.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from TriciaJ
    You must have had some sort of orientation to your unit. No good asking us, because hospitals use different brands of equipment which require different ways to do things. So just ask someone where you work. You might feel stupid having to ask (we have all been there). But the really stupid person is the one who doesn't ask, just tries to wing it. It's hard for us to help you when we don't know what kind of IV tubing you are using. So just find someone who looks receptive, and ASK.
    To OP and all new nurses...the scariest nurses are the ones who don't ask questions when they are unsure of what they are doing. I remember how hard it was for me, as a brand-new nurse, to ask questions; oftentimes because some nurses can just be plain mean, especially to new nurses. But, I always asked questions...even if I knew I would have to endure snarkasim (yes know it is not a word). I still bounce questions off other nurses and they do the same with me....nobody can know everything. Think about this...why do docs consult other docs?' My best advice is to take a good look around your unit...and you will get the feel for other nurses who (don't forget where they started from) and will love to educate you. And...don't forget when you become an experienced nurse to pass it on. BTW, saline lock (aka hep lock) means the IV or central line has no fluids running through it. Caps and tubing vary by facility.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from TriciaJ
    You must have had some sort of orientation to your unit. No good asking us, because hospitals use different brands of equipment which require different ways to do things. So just ask someone where you work. You might feel stupid having to ask (we have all been there). But the really stupid person is the one who doesn't ask, just tries to wing it. It's hard for us to help you when we don't know what kind of IV tubing you are using. So just find someone who looks receptive, and ASK.
    To OP and all new nurses...the scariest nurses are the ones who don't ask questions when they are unsure of what they are doing. I remember how hard it was for me, as a brand-new nurse, to ask questions; oftentimes because some nurses can just be plain mean, especially to new nurses. But, I always asked questions...even if I knew I would have to endure snarkasim (yes know it is not a word). I still bounce questions off other nurses and they do the same with me....nobody can know everything. Think about this...why do docs consult other docs?' My best advice is to take a good look around your unit...and you will get the feel for other nurses who (don't forget where they started from) and will love to educate you. And...don't forget when you become an experienced nurse to pass it on. BTW, saline lock (aka hep lock) means the IV or central line has no fluids running through it. Caps and tubing vary by facility.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from TriciaJ
    You must have had some sort of orientation to your unit. No good asking us, because hospitals use different brands of equipment which require different ways to do things. So just ask someone where you work. You might feel stupid having to ask (we have all been there). But the really stupid person is the one who doesn't ask, just tries to wing it. It's hard for us to help you when we don't know what kind of IV tubing you are using. So just find someone who looks receptive, and ASK.
    To OP and all new nurses...the scariest nurses are the ones who don't ask questions when they are unsure of what they are doing. I remember how hard it was for me, as a brand-new nurse, to ask questions; oftentimes because some nurses can just be plain mean, especially to new nurses. But, I always asked questions...even if I knew I would have to endure snarkasim (yes know it is not a word). I still bounce questions off other nurses and they do the same with me....nobody can know everything. Think about this...why do docs consult other docs?' My best advice is to take a good look around your unit...and you will get the feel for other nurses who (don't forget where they started from) and will love to educate you. And...don't forget when you become an experienced nurse to pass it on. BTW, saline lock (aka hep lock) means the IV or central line has no fluids running through it. Caps and tubing vary by facility.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from TriciaJ
    You must have had some sort of orientation to your unit. No good asking us, because hospitals use different brands of equipment which require different ways to do things. So just ask someone where you work. You might feel stupid having to ask (we have all been there). But the really stupid person is the one who doesn't ask, just tries to wing it. It's hard for us to help you when we don't know what kind of IV tubing you are using. So just find someone who looks receptive, and ASK.
    To OP and all new nurses...the scariest nurses are the ones who don't ask questions when they are unsure of what they are doing. I remember how hard it was for me, as a brand-new nurse, to ask questions; oftentimes because some nurses can just be plain mean, especially to new nurses. But, I always asked questions...even if I knew I would have to endure snarkasim (yes know it is not a word). I still bounce questions off other nurses and they do the same with me....nobody can know everything. Think about this...why do docs consult other docs?' My best advice is to take a good look around your unit...and you will get the feel for other nurses who (don't forget where they started from) and will love to educate you. And...don't forget when you become an experienced nurse to pass it on. BTW, saline lock (aka hep lock) means the IV or central line has no fluids running through it. Caps and tubing vary by facility.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from TriciaJ
    You must have had some sort of orientation to your unit. No good asking us, because hospitals use different brands of equipment which require different ways to do things. So just ask someone where you work. You might feel stupid having to ask (we have all been there). But the really stupid person is the one who doesn't ask, just tries to wing it. It's hard for us to help you when we don't know what kind of IV tubing you are using. So just find someone who looks receptive, and ASK.
    To OP and all new nurses...the scariest nurses are the ones who don't ask questions when they are unsure of what they are doing. I remember how hard it was for me, as a brand-new nurse, to ask questions; oftentimes because some nurses can just be plain mean, especially to new nurses. But, I always asked questions...even if I knew I would have to endure snarkasim (yes know it is not a word). I still bounce questions off other nurses and they do the same with me....nobody can know everything. Think about this...why do docs consult other docs?' My best advice is to take a good look around your unit...and you will get the feel for other nurses who (don't forget where they started from) and will love to educate you. And...don't forget when you become an experienced nurse to pass it on. BTW, saline lock (aka hep lock) means the IV or central line has no fluids running through it. Caps and tubing vary by facility.

  • Jul 17

    You know you have been a nurse too long, when one of parents deck you and you can't get up off the floor.

  • Jul 17

    When you fixate on people's veins when standing at the checkout line at a store.

  • Jul 17

    When you fixate on people's veins when standing at the checkout line at a store.


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