Content That Nurse Maru Likes

Content That Nurse Maru Likes

Nurse Maru (1,885 Views)

Joined Dec 22, '10 - from 'Nebraska'. Nurse Maru is a Psych Nurse. She has '2' year(s) of experience. Posts: 48 (48% Liked) Likes: 85

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  • Oct 10 '15

    We need to stop this, ethics demands that the pt has a say in their treatment. If we can tell a family their mom signed to be an organ donor and it's no longer up to them what happens to the pts organs why can we not tell family we are abiding by the written wishes of the pt for their living will.

  • Dec 14 '12

    Quote from T-Bird78
    If you call out sick and don't have a note, even for just one day, you don't get to use PTO with it.
    *** I used to work at a large Magnet hospital that had the same policy. One day some of us nurses were standing around in the ER talking about it and an ER physican heard us. He was incredulous and said that was the stupidiest thing he had ever heard (quite a statement coming from an experienced ER physician). This great man told us that if any of us ever needed a doctors note to show up in the ER and he would write us a note, and he did! All we had to do was walk in (we didn't wait in the waiting room but used the employee entrance) and say "Hi Doc!" and he would grab an Rx pad and write "PMFB-RN was seen by me in the ER today", hand it to us and we would be on our merry way. Word got around and pretty soon staff from the whole hospital was dropping by to ge a note. That one doc talked the other ER physicians into also writing us notes. He said "afer all it's perfectly true! You actually did see nurse Smith on the ER today" No other deails were on the note and the doc enjoyed telling nursing management that no he could not elaborate about what were were seen in the ER for, HIPAA you know!

  • Dec 14 '12

    Quote from blondy2061h
    The media is out of control. Their ceaseless pestering led to Diana's death, and now just a few short years into Will and Kate's marriage there's already been a needless death.
    The audience the media serves is more out of control. If not, there would be no media wasting their time on the celebrity crap.

    Those who buy the tabloids, visit the web sites, or watch the TV shows are "contributors."

  • Dec 14 '12

    Quote from rngolfer53
    The audience the media serves is more out of control. If not, there would be no media wasting their time on the celebrity crap.

    Those who buy the tabloids, visit the web sites, or watch the TV shows are "contributors."
    So true.

  • Dec 13 '12

    We had a really mean pt on our oncology unit. I was told she was a very intelligent and articulate woman who was in denial for a long time and who was now trying to blame the medical establishment for her life limiting cancer. She was leaving the unit for daily radiation tx. Lucky for me I never was assigned to her during her two or three brief stays with us. Next door to her was my sweet, simple pt--a frequent flier who had life limiting colon cancer. She was on heavy amounts of Dilauded and was a bit of a scatterbrained to begin with.

    She would leave the unit frequently with IV pole in tow to visit the vending machines or people watch in the lobby. Upon returning, My scatter brain sweat-heart pt passed me by at the front desk establishing it would be another hour before she could have her PRN Dilauded/Benedryl combo. She left me and went out of sight down the hall where she settled into the wrong room, sitting on the edge of the bed of the mean pt who started to pitch a fit on the level you've never heard/seen before when she returned with her transport team who had already been yelled at several times for various things. Needless to say they disappeared as soon as they could so she leashed a full fury attack on my sweet pt--throwing racial slurs and just saying the meanest things.

    My pt had barely sat down and didn't touch anything, still we remade the bed and obtained a new meal tray. We arranged for a flower delivery. We even wiped all surfaces down with Sani Wipes and called housekeeping to clean the restroom. Mean Lady berated me the whole time to her own nurse who she also treated badly.

    While I and the other nurse attempted to do "service recovery" on the mean pt. (and I kindly asked the relief nurse to settle my crying pt into her own room and pull some Ativan early for her based on a phone order I had just obtained), my manager pulled me aside and said she would be writing me up for not preventing my pt from going into the wrong room. That I should have been rounding frequently enough to have noticed my pt was in the wrong room.

    So tell me, I asked, how would I know my frequently ambulating/restless pt had settled into the room covered by another nurse? She told me that I should been a good enough nurse to have prevented the situation. Hmmm, I thought to myself, no amount of "good nursing" was going to prevent an honest mistake from happening that was totally unrelated to my nursing care. Am I right?

  • Oct 2 '12

    I wish nurses would treat each other better

  • Sep 30 '12

    Just as much as I wouldn't tolerate verbal and emotional abuse at home, there's no reason why I would tolerate it in the work place.
    Document, document, document and raise it to the hierachy.

  • Sep 30 '12

    Job hunt now while you are still employed. Don't leave until you find another position.. 6 months is not ideal but that shouldn't stop you from looking and putting yourself out there. As for the doc, write her up and keep going up your chain of command. If you must, file a complaint with the state or what ever the governing body of MD's are. The last MD I knew like that lost his license in one state and had to go through anger management plus rehab in his current state for this type of behavior...

  • Sep 30 '12

    Write it up. Nurses write eachother up all the time. Are doctors exempt? Exempt from have to respect coworkers? No.

  • Sep 27 '12

    I haven't read any of the other responses because what the OP wrote struck a chord.
    I got a call at work that my daughter, who was in the ER at another facility had coded, and I needed to get there ASAP. My fellow nurses immediately divided my pts and after the briefest of reports sent me on my way. We called the boss, but I don't even remember what she said.
    There was no discussion about the work load. The women I worked with that day saw my distress and helped me in the only way they could.
    Even had I stayed and waited for a replacement, I wasn't thinking clearly.
    On that day, nurses treated one of their own, with the same sense of compassion we are expected to give to pts.
    It's hard for me imagine anyone so cold blooded as to prevent a person from being with family in an emergency

  • Sep 25 '12

    If you work inpatient psych, guess what: you are still in floor nursing!

    Davey Do summed it up best. It's not without medical components: contrary to what some others believe, psych patients don't check their medical issues at the door when admitted. They may be controlled medical issues, but they will be there and will be unable to be ignored. And if a facility took only psych patients with no medical issues whatsoever, they'd have a very small census.

    Inpatient psych nursing is not the "put up your feet and take a break" nursing that some think it is--if that is your mentality, turn around now because you will be eaten alive in your first week. It's a different speciality of nursing with its own skill set as well as its own stressors. Pace may be faster or slower. Plus it's actually more physical/hands-on than one may think. And there is an increased risk of physical danger to staff...not as bad as the risk of working in the ED IMO, but it's there. Staff are trained to handle such incidents, but that doesn't eliminate the risk entirely.

    The best way for you to see what it's like is to experience it for yourself. See if you can get a per-diem job there, or at least shadow for a few shifts (you need to do more than one to get a truer picture of what psych nursing is like). You may find it's the change you seek, or you may find you've went from frying pan to fire. You won't know until you try.

    Best of luck whatever you decide!

  • Sep 20 '12

    This question comes from the perspective of a student or very new grad, who thinks that all nursing is, is "tasks," which is what they call "skills." This is because they have just spent their instructional time focusing on the lab check-off sheet and being jealous of their peers who "got to do a ... !!" as if putting in a Foley, starting an IV, or sinking an NG were such great shakes that they'd remember every one they ever did forever. (Hint: Not.)

    Do not ever say a psych nurse has "lost all her skills." There are very, very specific skills that psych nursing demands; just because your friends don't think they see the nurses at the mental health facility "doing anything" doesn't mean that those nurses are not, in fact, doing a great deal. They are. If you are savvy enough to learn from them, you'll learn a LOT you can definitely use in ER. No worries on that score, really. Where do crazy people go, anyway? Right! The ER.

    And I say this from the perspective of a long-time critical care nurse who "got to do...!!" everything you can think of and a lot you can't. Take the psych job and be thankful you have the opportunity to do it.


    Note: to get full impact of this message, it should display in Comic Sans, green. Thank you.

  • Sep 18 '12

    Aggressively interview. Tell them you are looking for a change, different shift, shorter commute, or something neutral. Have at least two references from your current facility-charge nurses or supervisors. See if they will give you a severance, apply for unemployment.
    Focus on your strengths and what you can bring to a new position..These are some ideas.. Good luck!!

  • Sep 13 '12

    Quote from PennyWise
    I too have been annoyed by the theorists who spew on and on about "caring". Its as if they all wrote their work after a very long separation from the profession. The theories simply did not apply to nurses doing direct patient care it seemed, and they were not practical at all.

    Much later, I find myself with a new attitude towards some of the specific theories and nursing theory overall. Part of the reason for my change of heart is my new way of defining "care".

    "Caring" is not a static word or action. Think back to your Psych 101 class to get my jest. Every PSY101 class begins the same way, with the question: "What is normal?". Most people struggle giving it a concrete description that holds up in different settings/situations. Apply the same train of thought to "Nursing Care". What is it? When are you doing nursing care and when are you doing "other tasks" or "paperwork"? Its hard to come up with a description that holds up long.

    Why? Because what "care" is changes with the patient's needs and what they face at the moment. I used to work on a M/S unit, and a fair share of my patients needed little more than their meds and help getting to the bathroom. Now, if I am out at the desk documenting and discussing things with the Case Manager/Social Worker while this patient needs to get into the bathroom, I'm not "caring" for the patient. On the other hand, once my patient is done having their elimination needs met, if I go out to the desk and spend the next half hour checking on the status of my Fantasy sports team, I'm not "caring" for the patient. I could instead be addressing the plan of care, documenting so that care can follow a well informed continuum and anticipating discharge needs. If the doctor holds their discharge because they don't know the patient has been voiding and this is a direct result of my lack of documenting, I have not "cared" for the patient. Then again, if my patient is having an active MI and I choose to run to the computer to chart that AM's output.................you know what goes here.
    I think you have made a really good point here. Reminds me of the dilemma anthropologists face when observing cultures -- do the behaviors of the cultures change as a reflection of the observation, do the observers change as a reflection of the cultures observed?

    It's hard to identify a pure concept of what care means in nursing, with so many people involved, and to separate the subjective ideas of caring for x or caring about x, or even being cared for, from the objective, tangible tasks of providing care.

    Because nursing, at it's core, is about disparate individuals interacting with each other; and what happens when people interact is that they change.

    And for nurses, that means that everything we do changes everything. All the time.

    It's exhausting to think about or to try and keep up with it.

    It's also a good reason that computers will never be good nurses.

  • Sep 13 '12

    I too have been annoyed by the theorists who spew on and on about "caring". Its as if they all wrote their work after a very long separation from the profession. The theories simply did not apply to nurses doing direct patient care it seemed, and they were not practical at all.

    Much later, I find myself with a new attitude towards some of the specific theories and nursing theory overall. Part of the reason for my change of heart is my new way of defining "care".

    "Caring" is not a static word or action. Think back to your Psych 101 class to get my jest. Every PSY101 class begins the same way, with the question: "What is normal?". Most people struggle giving it a concrete description that holds up in different settings/situations. Apply the same train of thought to "Nursing Care". What is it? When are you doing nursing care and when are you doing "other tasks" or "paperwork"? Its hard to come up with a description that holds up long.

    Why? Because what "care" is changes with the patient's needs and what they face at the moment. I used to work on a M/S unit, and a fair share of my patients needed little more than their meds and help getting to the bathroom. Now, if I am out at the desk documenting and discussing things with the Case Manager/Social Worker while this patient needs to get into the bathroom, I'm not "caring" for the patient. On the other hand, once my patient is done having their elimination needs met, if I go out to the desk and spend the next half hour checking on the status of my Fantasy sports team, I'm not "caring" for the patient. I could instead be addressing the plan of care, documenting so that care can follow a well informed continuum and anticipating discharge needs. If the doctor holds their discharge because they don't know the patient has been voiding and this is a direct result of my lack of documenting, I have not "cared" for the patient. Then again, if my patient is having an active MI and I choose to run to the computer to chart that AM's output.................you know what goes here.

    Gene Watson's theories were brought up, and I am a fan of hers now. I used to bash her relentlessly though in school and as a new nurse. If you apply my changing/conforming definition of care to her theories, she is much more palpable. Her thoughts on "therapeutic touch" are what kill her in my opinion. They give the rest of her theories a sense/feel of "lovey/touchy" that was not intended. When you read her theories with those tinted glasses, it can seem that her theory dummies down nursing and anyone who can "koochie koochie" their patient is a good nurse. I think we can all agree that is not the point Watson was making.

    Instead, I take her theories as being a call to arms. She realized the importance of a therapeutic relation between a caregiver and a patient. While administration and business directed administration attempt to pile more and more work on nurses, the amount of quality time spent with patients is reduced. Since there is "no money to be made" in quality patient relations, this is a sacrifice they are more than happy to make. The politicians and policy makers see this trend and have taken action to better direct healthcare facilities, but more time is needed before their efforts bear fruit. Watson realized that a person to person relation, applied under the guidance of the proper vision of "care", is necessary for health and improves outcomes. It is our burden to take this knowledge and use it to further nursing as a profession. We have not done so........yet.

    Another poster talked much about how technology and UAP are taking over nursing and phasing us out. I disagree. Most facilities I know of who have gone to such measures have reversed field by now. It just never works out. I don't think it ever will either. What I talked about above is why. Machines can not achieve a therapeutic relation with their patients. Bots who take vitals can not express any concern for the patients well being or assess changes in the patient's condition that require a change in the plan of care. Computers deciding when the patient's condition changes and informing/calling doctors? LOL, well, considering that they can't even develop a tire pressure gauge that is reliable enough to inform us when to check the tires, I don't think we're as close to this as you seem to believe. You think doctors flip out now about unnecessary/improper phone calls, oh my.........wait until they try to let a computer do it and see what results you get.


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