Latest Comments by nursingstudent_2012

Latest Comments by nursingstudent_2012

nursingstudent_2012 1,705 Views

Joined Oct 31, '10. Posts: 34 (12% Liked) Likes: 7

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  • 0

    I will ask my preceptor that. Thank you so much. That's a really good suggestion.

  • 1
    brandy1017 likes this.

    Thanks for the clarification. That makes sense. And thank you for the suggestions. I found several useful tools from ASIA and am planning to explore both websites. I'll also check out Craig and Shepherd Hospitals' websites.

    Honestly IDK what to expect so I'm nervous. I'm so used to being in a regular unit like Med-Surg and Cardiac CU. So when I heard Rehab I automatically thought "what's the difference?"

  • 0

    Thank you so much. I was thinking Neuro and musculoskeletal would be the main focus. But reading about SCI a little more, I realized there are a lot of other important things that I need to focus on.

  • 0

    Hi everyone. I'm a nursing student and I found out yesterday that I was assigned to do my clinicals at a Spinal Cord Rehab unit of a hospital. I have never been to a rehab unit ever in my entire 3 years in nursing school and have no idea what kind of assessments you do for patients in a rehab unit. I did research last night but aside from neuro assessments I'm still clueless as to what I need to do for the patients.

    Can anyone please enlighten me? I'm guessing since it's a Rehab unit it's an outpatient right? So what kinds of assessments are necessary for spinal cord injury patients? Is there a universal assessment tool available that all hospitals use? I need to make a time management tool but I'm having trouble making one since i dont know what you do in a rehab unit.

  • 0

    HI everyone. I'm doing a research related to cardiac nursing. I'm really interested in the heart so I want to focus on it for this research project even though I'm doing my preceptorship at an Oncology/MedSurg unit.


    So basically we are supposed to develop a research proposal. So I would like to ask those of you who works at CCU what issues/problems have you seen/noticed in your unit that you think needs to be addressed/changed?

  • 0

    Quote from Jolie
    Based upon this statement, I don't think you understand what Rhogam is and what it does. Giving an injection to the mother post-delivery does not protect her newborn from anything. Please read up on this med so that you understand its function.

    What nursing considerations do you have for Rhogam?
    I was refering to the postpartum stage.
    Here are the nursing considerations that I have so far:
    Before:
    1. Pt with immunoglobulin A deficiency may develop immunoglobulin A antibodies and have anaphylactic reaction; must weigh benefits of treatment against risk of hypersensitivity reactions before giving.
    2. Obtain and review hx of allergies and reactions to immunizations. Keep epinephrine 1:1,000 ready to treat anaphylaxis.
    3. Immediately after delivery, send a sample of neonate's cord blood to laboratory for typing and cross-matching. Confirm if mother is Rho (D)-negative and Du -negative. Give drug to mother ONLY IF infant is Rho (D)- OR Du -positive. Administration must occur w/in 72 hours of delivery.
    4. Use with caution in pt with thrombocytopenia or coagulation disorders; hemorrhage/hematoma may occur from IM administration.
    After:
    1. Monitor for s/s of intravascular hemolysis (IVH), anemia, renal insufficiency, back pain, shaking, chills, discolored urine, or hematuria for 8 hours after administration.
    2. Assess pt for difficulty breathing, tachycardia, back rash, pain, redness, swelling or pain at injection site, decreased urine output, peripheral edema.

  • 1
    xtxrn likes this.

    thank you very much everyone for the advice. You are all very helpful.

  • 0

    Quote from JenG2011
    Hi- I am an L&D nurse and also a A- mother. Besides the above mentioned considerations. Rhogam is a blood product, but after delivery we draw maternal blood to look for any maternal-fetal blood mixing. Make sure you know what rhogam is for. The dose is titrated for the specific mom. Also the women is given a card to indicate she has received it. She needs to be made aware so if she needs blood products in the near future the blood bank is made aware to explain the antibodies.
    Also I tell my moms to put the Tucks in the fridge it really helps with post partum healing and itching. I know this one first hand. Hope that helps. Jen

    Thank you very much. This is very helpful. I know RhoGam is administered to prevent poisoning the baby if there's an incompatibility present, right? That's what I based my nursing considerations.

  • 0

    Quote from Jolie
    I wouldn't stress over the nutrition bar. Most vitamins are water soluable. If the patient takes in a large amount of a vitamin due to food intake plus supplement, the kidneys will excrete the excess. Your concern would be more for her overall use of vitamin supplements that may double or triple what is in her prenatal vitamins.

    Tucks contain witch hazel which is used for comfort and cleansing of hemorrhoids and/or perineal lacerations.

    You are correct that Rhogam is a blood product, so you're on the right track there. But not every mother gets Rhogam. Who should receive this med and why?
    So for Tucks, I should still look for signs&symptoms of allergic reaction right?

  • 0

    Quote from Jenni811
    over my head, i hated L&D. You sound like your WAY in depth. I really could care less if a mom ate a nutritional bar before taking vitamins. i mean alcohol can't be consumed during pregnancy, so if a pregnant woman wants a nutrition bar, i'd let her eat a nutrition bar.

    Sorry, i'm not much help

    It's ok. It's something to think about. Thanks for replying.

  • 0

    hi everyone. i am making drug cards for my clinicals this sem which happnes to be in l&d and pediatrics units.

    i couldn't find info on my drugbook and on the net about the nursing actions on the following meds. can someone please help?

    1. tucks/witch hazel pads -- i couldn't find info when i search for tucks pads but i would when i just typed in "tucks" which could be cream, lotion. honestly i am not familiar with this at all. web did not help much coz i could see the actual product. web just showed pictures of the box that it comes in.

    2. rhogam -- confused about this one. since basically we are worried about possible reactions d/t blood typing/cross-matching/incompatibilities, the nurse should still watch for signs of anaphylactic reactions after administration right? and if so then that would be one nursing action after drug administration. would there be others?

    3. prenatal vitamins --- i have the ff. for nursing actions. are these correct?
    nursing actions:

    before:

    1. double check if pt has just eaten a nutritional bar because this could result in an overdose on certain nutrients.
    2. check if pt is taking any other supplements to avoid overdose.
    3. do not crush, break or open tablet or capsule form. tell pt not to chew it.
    4. advise pt not to take with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements or antacids that contain calcium.
    5. iron supplementation should not be used with hemochromatosis/hemosiderosis.
    6. use with caution on pt with severe hepatic impairment.
    7. use with caution in pt with kidney stones d/t calcium content.
    8. use with caution on pt with severe renal impairment.
    after:
    1. check for signs/symptoms of overdose such as stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.
    sorry for the long question. i already used several sources but still couldn't find what i'm looking for.

  • 0

    Hello RNs and RN students. I am a nursing student. Just started my 3rd semester. It's our first time learning about mother and baby, peds. I am having my very first clinical rotation (of the semester) this FRiday and I am assigned to be in the NICU. I am excited but nervous at the same time. I mean I have never taken care of a sick baby before and these babies are really sick and fragile.

    Any advice for a student's FIRST TIME NICU EXPERIENCE?

  • 0

    Hello RNs and RN students. I am a nursing student. Just started my 3rd semester. It's our first time learning about mother and baby, peds. I am having my very first clinical rotation (of the semester) this FRiday and I am assigned to be in the NICU. I am excited but nervous at the same time. I mean I have never taken care of a sick baby before and these babies are really sick and fragile.

    Any advice for a student's FIRST TIME NICU EXPERIENCE?

  • 0

    hi everyone. i am making drug cards for my clinicals this sem which happnes to be in l&d and pediatrics units.

    i couldn't find info on my drugbook and on the net about the nursing actions on the following meds. can someone please help?

    1. tucks/witch hazel pads -- i couldn't find info when i search for tucks pads but i would when i just typed in "tucks" which could be cream, lotion. honestly i am not familiar with this at all. web did not help much coz i could see the actual product. web just showed pictures of the box that it comes in.

    2. rhogam -- confused about this one. since basically we are worried about possible reactions d/t blood typing/cross-matching/incompatibilities, the nurse should still watch for signs of anaphylactic reactions after administration right? and if so then that would be one nursing action after drug administration. would there be others?

    3. prenatal vitamins --- i have the ff. for nursing actions. are these correct?
    nursing actions:

    before:

    1. double check if pt has just eaten a nutritional bar because this could result in an overdose on certain nutrients.
    2. check if pt is taking any other supplements to avoid overdose.
    3. do not crush, break or open tablet or capsule form. tell pt not to chew it.
    4. advise pt not to take with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements or antacids that contain calcium.
    5. iron supplementation should not be used with hemochromatosis/hemosiderosis.
    6. use with caution on pt with severe hepatic impairment.
    7. use with caution in pt with kidney stones d/t calcium content.
    8. use with caution on pt with severe renal impairment.
    after:
    1. check for signs/symptoms of overdose such as stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, tingly feeling in or around your mouth, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.
    sorry for the long question. i already used several sources but still couldn't find what i'm looking for.


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