Content That Anna Flaxis Likes

Content That Anna Flaxis Likes

Anna Flaxis, ASN 20,097 Views

Joined Oct 15, '10. Posts: 2,815 (67% Liked) Likes: 8,386

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  • May 19

    Quote from ERgirlynurse
    I was not referring to suing the hospital.
    The title of your thread is "Terminated. Pursue a Lawsuit?" Who, exactly, were you referring to suing, if not the hospital??

  • May 18
  • May 18

    Quote from Been there,done that
    I worked a small ICU.. if I felt the need to access any patient's chart in the unit during my shift, it is MY responsibility to do so. I was responsible for ALL the patients in the unit if and when the assigned nurse was off the unit.. or too busy to attend to their assigned patient.
    I agree with this concept. Now, I dont think that it necessarily sounds like that was what this nurse's goal was in accessing that chart. But it would be very hard to prove that he was just being nosy vs. being prepared to assist the patient if the assigned nurse wasn't available.

  • May 18

    P.S. They are not YOUR charts. They are the patient's charts. I worked a small ICU.. if I felt the need to access any patient's chart in the unit during my shift , it is MY responsibility to do so. I was responsible for ALL the patients in the unit if and when the assigned nurse was off the unit.. or too busy to attend to their assigned patient.

  • May 18

    Quote from Anna Flaxis
    I disagree. In a small department where you are each others' backup, I think it's important to be familiar with all of the patients on the unit. In the ED, while I have my assigned patients, I need to know who else is in the department and why they're there, and what the plan of care is, because we back each other up- I may or may not end up doing any care on someone else's patient, but I should be aware of what's going on in case I am needed to do so, especially since we don't have a charge nurse.

    As a House Supervisor, I don't actually provide any care (most of the time), but I do review the charts to know who is in the hospital, why they are in the hospital, what the plan of care is, any issues or concerns, that core measures are being met, and what the discharge plan is. I also review charts of ED patients to be on the lookout for potential admits.

    So, there are reasons that are perfectly legitimate and not violations of HIPAA for someone not directly providing care to be in the patient's chart.

    Maevish, rather than being passive aggressive and dropping hints, have you directly asked your co-worker why they are reviewing the chart?

    Yes I have (he's bored) and he butts out when I ask him to. There are never any breaks and the other nurses only provide care/help me when I ask them to (which is perfectly fine), but since they aren't ever providing care for my patients, I don't see any reason for any of them to be in my charts. As I said, the guy gets out of my chart when I ask him to, but that's beside the point because he (and everyone else) keeps doing it.


    As house supervisor and other areas of nursing I completely understand that. When I was a charge nurse I had to glance over charts to make sure I knew what was up if I was breaking someone or going to bed control. However, there are no charge nurses or floats nurses here and I don't go into charts where I'm not involved directly with the care and I didn't know people actually did that (supervisors, charges, etc aside).


    If they were doing audits or something like that, that would be one thing, but they're not and it just feels wrong. I'm cool with a quick report sheet that some hospitals do where you write code status, why they're here, activity, restraints, etc, but they don't do that here. I guess I've never been in an ICU where things were so slow (it really is tedious here at times) cause no one else has had the time to be nosy anywhere else I've worked

    xo

  • May 15

    thank you so much! I think it was a rough night and I'm just gonna keep trying to be more organized and manage better. Last night went better and hoping for a better night tonight! I just hope it does eventually improve, yano?

  • May 15

    When you think about it, it is pretty astounding that a person has to lay in severe pain despite the physical availability of pain medication. And, an admitting doc ordering 2 mg of morphine, (equivalent to 1 Vicodin) for pancreatitis with no additional or prn order is pretty numb.

    From the point the pain starts, an inadequate dose is given, re-assessed 1/2 hour later, a call made, an order given, and medication administered can be a really long time.

    Despite it being normal, it sucks. Especially since the issue was predictable and preventable had the doc done his/her job.

    Maybe: "I think if I was in your position I would feel the exact same way. I can promise you as your mom's nurse, I will do the best I can within the system, and I will give you the number of our VP in charge of patient relations."

    The anger is legit, and while it is being expressed toward you, it is not about you. Deflect it and point it where it is warranted.

  • May 15

    Thank you so much for reading my post, and taking time to reply. I read all the comments many times. Each comment left me something. Some lead me to reflex and think, some shared experiences in a field that I've never been before, some made me smile, and some gave me an encouragement. I am happy that I had a place to ask a question, and am very grateful that so many people gave me a helping hand. I'm very sorry that I cannot reply to each comment.

    Yes, I have heard people swear before, but truthfully not very often. I don't recall hearing profanity at home, the one I grew up in or the one of my own. And this male patient was probably the third, maybe the fourth one that I heard swearing in recovery room since I started working here 7 years ago. The previous patients were, just as someone said from his/her experience, said it once and apologized a few seconds later. So this patient was my first that kept swearing every 10 seconds, and this was the first time that I requested to stop swearing.

    His pain was very severe, and I maxed out with pain medication and asked the anesthesia team for help. By the time he felt better we had given him more than 4mg Dilaudid and 250 mcg Fentanyl and Ofirmev, taking as long as one hour before he was able to drift off to sleep.

    It was very inspiring to know about the study that shows that swearing reduce stress or pain. That helps me find an answer to what I was wondering. It reminded me of when I had a hip surgery due to a congenital issue, or when I had hydronephrosis due to kidney stone, both in my 20's. I was in an intense pain that I could barely breathe. I became tearful and had no control. If someone asked me not to, it would've been very difficult if I tried. And with the study I see that swearing is a way that people cope with some form of crisis, just as crying is what I do to deal with it when I'm very emotional or stressed.

    Then I must say that it was unprofessional that I asked him to stop swearing. Of course if he couldn't, there wouldn't have been any way for anyone to "make" him stop. But he should've been able to say what he needed to say.

    Some people mentioned my ability of handling anything when I had a hard time handling profanity. Yes, it has been 15 years since I started working as an RN but I still learn something new everyday. I am probably not a great nurse who can handle things well as suspected here, but I'm trying to be better with any help that I can have. Some come from people that I know, some come from people that I can only meet in the cyberspace.

    Thank you so much again for all your comments to help me be better. I think I can start a great new week. Hope this will be another great one for you as well.

  • May 15

    This is a very gracious, thoughtful response SweetieBeeSandy.

    Quote from SweetieBeeSandy
    Thank you so much for reading my post, and taking time to reply. I read all the comments many times. Each comment left me something. Some lead me to reflex and think, some shared experiences in a field that I've never been before, some made me smile, and some gave me an encouragement. I am happy that I had a place to ask a question, and am very grateful that so many people gave me a helping hand. I'm very sorry that I cannot reply to each comment.

    Yes, I have heard people swear before, but truthfully not very often. I don't recall hearing profanity at home, the one I grew up in or the one of my own. And this male patient was probably the third, maybe the fourth one that I heard swearing in recovery room since I started working here 7 years ago. The previous patients were, just as someone said from his/her experience, said it once and apologized a few seconds later. So this patient was my first that kept swearing every 10 seconds, and this was the first time that I requested to stop swearing.

    His pain was very severe, and I maxed out with pain medication and asked the anesthesia team for help. By the time he felt better we had given him more than 4mg Dilaudid and 250 mcg Fentanyl and Ofirmev, taking as long as one hour before he was able to drift off to sleep.

    It was very inspiring to know about the study that shows that swearing reduce stress or pain. That helps me find an answer to what I was wondering. It reminded me of when I had a hip surgery due to a congenital issue, or when I had hydronephrosis due to kidney stone, both in my 20's. I was in an intense pain that I could barely breathe. I became tearful and had no control. If someone asked me not to, it would've been very difficult if I tried. And with the study I see that swearing is a way that people cope with some form of crisis, just as crying is what I do to deal with it when I'm very emotional or stressed.

    Then I must say that it was unprofessional that I asked him to stop swearing. Of course if he couldn't, there wouldn't have been any way for anyone to "make" him stop. But he should've been able to say what he needed to say.

    Some people mentioned my ability of handling anything when I had a hard time handling profanity. Yes, it has been 15 years since I started working as an RN but I still learn something new everyday. I am probably not a great nurse who can handle things well as suspected here, but I'm trying to be better with any help that I can have. Some come from people that I know, some come from people that I can only meet in the cyberspace.

    Thank you so much again for all your comments to help me be better. I think I can start a great new week. Hope this will be another great one for you as well.

  • May 14

    It seems I've seen more threads lately from potential nurses that don't really want to work as nurses. It may not be impossible to find work away from bedside nursing right out of school, but I don't think that it is likely. I guess my question to you and the others that are posting this question is if you really don't ever want to work providing patient care as a nurse, why would you even want to be a nurse?

  • May 14

    Quote from nynursey_
    If you're absolutely positive that you have zero interest in bedside nursing (hospitals, SNFs, LTACHs, LTC) then I don't think hospital experience is a must. It will hone your assessment skills and clinical skills but if your goal is to work in a clinic for the rest of your career then it's not particularly pertinent. Not every nurse desires to run the every day rat-race of floor nursing. And I don't blame them.

    As for career options, consider these:

    1. Urgent Care
    2. Clinic
    3. Private Practice (Primary Care)
    4. UR (Utilization Review)/CM (Case Management)
    5. Public Health (Education Focused)

    I hope these suggestions help! Good luck in finding that right fit!
    In number 1, at least in my area, requires 2-5 years of ED experience, especially when there is going to be the solo nurse present, just FYI.

  • May 14

    Quote from westieluv
    I think they ask for this experience because they can, due to the demand for non-bedside positions these days.
    Well, also because it's v. difficult to be a competent, effective case manager without having a thorough understanding of how the larger healthcare system works, clients' needs, and the solutions to those needs, usually acquired through years of experience.

  • May 14

    Yes, I get called constantly at times. I never answer and I never call back. There's nothing wrong with saying no or not saying anything, at all.

  • May 10

    thanks. Sounds a lot like me. I tell my husband I'm a nurse, but I'm me at home. It's a role and I try to do my best everyday. I'm told the same....I'm the calm, "chill", patient one that people aren't afraid to ask for help ....thanks for sharing!

  • May 7

    One more thing.

    OP, I want to make sure you understand the nursing role. You are not in a position of authority over your patients. It is not up to you to discipline or correct them. That is actually an abuse of the nursing role. You assess, educate, and implement nursing interventions.

    There is no care plan in the world that includes "berate patient until behavior improves."


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