Latest Comments by amianurseyet?

amianurseyet? 588 Views

Joined Oct 3, '10. Posts: 30 (7% Liked) Likes: 2

Sorted By Last Comment (Max 500)
  • 0

    she's right. i'm moving slowly. however, it's not because i'm out to lunch, so much as i'm concerned that i'll make a mistake that may get me eliminated from my program. we have evaluations next week. otherwise, my report is very good with her. anyone else ever feel slow in clinicals? i notice my friends will speed through things in order NOT to look conspicuously slow. it works for them. for me, clinicals feels very similar to my fear of heights. i just don't want to die.

  • 1
    Boog'sCRRN246 likes this.

    you're putting me on, right? wow....bwahahahaha. that's got to be the worst i've ever heard. yep, definitely justified there.

  • 0

    oh, but i should have asked you both: what, then, have you witnessed in the clinical setting that has resulted in a student's dismissal, did you or did you not think it was justified, and why?

  • 0

    i want to believe both of you about the bias. and by all rights, particularly based on my education in social psychology(e.g., theories like "self serving bias""), i would. however, i've even witnessed unwarranted targeting (probably should have mentioned that?). so, i can't agree that it's all lack of accountability on the part of the reporter. anyway, i suppose this thread is an attempt to get the viewpoints of people who actually have experienced/witnessed this and/or successfully survived/avoided it. thanks for your input.

  • 0

    it seems that, for the most part, failing nursing school has primarily to do with getting pegged off in clinicals. sometimes this is easily justifiable (e.g., truly dangerous action on the part of the student, general lack of professionalism, etc.). however, based on many of the stories i've read here and elsewhere, it is often unjustifiable (e.g., a nasty CI targets a student and makes a case to fail them). i have heard many stories regarding specific CI's at my school that i plan on avoiding throughout my time here, if at all possible;not because i can't or am unwilling to work with "difficult" people, but because i am unwilling to be failed out of nursing school. i am curious as to how many people here have been strategical about their CI selection, and to what extent they (or others they might know) attribute this to their surviving nursing school.thanks. has "rate my professor" been of any assistance?

  • 0

    "Get with the class mate who is doing really well and ask them how do they study, what makes them retain the information and what thinking process that they have to achieve good scores."

    bingo.find the smartest one, compliment them on how much you admire their intelligence, and basically make yourself a barnacle on their brain. i've done it and it works.smart people love nothing more than to have disciples. get it done.

  • 0

    not at all! i totally appreciate your input. that's exactly the sort of thing i came in here to hear!

  • 1
    nursel56 likes this.

    thank you! yeah, i'm confident it will go away; because, as i've said, this is something that i've been dealing with on and off throughout my life. i know how it works. there's definitely a pattern and predictability to it. which is comforting in its own way. in other words, i know what situations are going to elicit the response, and i can generally predict how long it will take for it to dissipate. anyway, i've got 5 more days and then clinicals are over, which is hard to believe. so, not too many shots to prove my salt to this instructor. if i can't impress her with my typing, i'll do it with my care plans, i guess.

  • 0

    yeah, just started this weekend. my instructor seems, thus far, impressed by my academic stuff (e.g., care plans, chart reviews, ability to answer science/health related questions, etc.) but, she's indicated that she can see my anxiety. i just wish i could hide it better. my return-demos in lab, for instance, though i passed all of them, were an absolute disaster (imo). very jittery/sloppy indeed. i just don't do well at performing fine motor tasks on a tight rope over a snake pit with no practice. but, maybe that's just me. my real concern, is that i'll eventually get one of these instructors who, rather than focusing on teaching me to be a nurse, will instead take it upon herself to make comments about my personage (i.e., a tremor in my hands, things i generally have no control over at all, etc.) and somehow equate those things with not having what it takes to be a nurse. because, i can say with certainty, that being personally attacked does not generally motivate me to perform exceptionally well.

  • 0

    whoa! okay, i've always been inclined to anxiety. however, i maintain a decent sense of humor about it most of the time. i laugh is off as "neurosis" ala woody allen, and most of my friends, girlfriends, etc. have generally considered it an even endearing aspect of my character. perhaps because i'm open about being afraid about certain aspects of life, and am willing to talk about it with people?it's a good ice breaker, generally. but.....the level of PHYSIOLOGICAL anxiety that i'm experiencing in nursing school (in labs, and now in clinicals) is ,at times, totally humiliating. i mean, the other day at clinical, my hands were actually shaking as i typed my patient info into the system. this would not normally have been the case, of course; however, my clinical instructor was observing me while i did it, and i've got a thing about that. basically, when i've got anxiety, you would never really know it, EXCEPT for if i had to do anything fine-motor related (like, say, typing) in front of you. i can't exactly tell my sympathetic nervous system not to be my sympathetic nervous system at will. it was embarrassing. she's really cool, but she noticed enough to tell me to take a deep breath and chill. see, that just kinda sucks that my anxiety is that visible and there's nothing i can do about it. my brain is there, i've got it more or less together, etc. but, i'm not acclimated to the clinical setting yet, and, until i am, these physiological manifestations of anxiety are going to persist. i know myself well enough to know that, with time and repeated exposure to the environment, all that will dissipate and i'll be completely fine. my fear, though, is that, due to the constant scrutiny of observation i'm under, my instructor might consider anxiety an actual "problem," a sign of weakness, etc. there is no jedi mind trick for me. i've tried them all. all i can do is persist and wait for my brain to turn the anxiety thermostat down. i just hope that this instructor (and future instructors) are cool enough to understand that. anyone else experience fairly persistent physiological manifestations of anxiety while under the supervision of clinical instructors? i'd be really interested to learn how it's been for you. and, i'd be particularly interested to learn whether or not your anxiety issues have ever come up in your evaluations. thanks.

  • 0
  • 0

    i thought it would be interesting to start a thread wherein people share stories regarding errors that nearly cost them their degree in nursing. there are so many ways to screw up as a nursing student; some more obvious than others. yet, sometimes it's the seemingly small error that might land a student in a world of pain. stories of survival regarding such experiences are inspiring to those of us currently fighting the street fight that is nursing school. let's face it, it gets kinda dirty.



close