Latest Likes For conscientiousnurse

Latest Likes For conscientiousnurse

conscientiousnurse, RN 3,255 Views

Joined Sep 5, '10. Posts: 107 (26% Liked) Likes: 43

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  • Mar 8

    You said it was at a home health care company. Can you be more specific: are you talking about private-duty homecare, where you care for 1 person for an entire shift in their home, or are you talking of make home health visits, like a visiting nurse? Those are entirely different types of nursing. If it's private-duty home health, and if they do orientations for every patient and also have a good support system for you, it may be entirely appropriate for a new grad. Since private-duty only gives you 1 patient at a time, you can do your homework on all their diagnoses and meds/treatments and can often "bounce off" your thoughts on the next shift's home care nurse, or the patient's family members if present (They know the patient best, and are often a great resource). (You could also call your supervisor in the office, or the patient's M.D. Worst case: there's always 911, if you think it's an emergent situation. 911 can assess the patient and let you know whether they think they need hospitalization). Since patients in private-duty care are usually quite stable, I don't see it being a big problem to have a new grad, as long as you have fairly good assessment skills and good support.

  • Jun 29 '15

    If you're able to insert IVs so well, have you considered applying for Phlebotomist positions? Seems like a job that doesn't require heavy lifting or a lot of the things nurses hate about their jobs. Also, some insurance companies hire people to go to homes to do phlebotomy and simple exams to check eligibility for life insurance.



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