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manusko 9,869 Views

Joined: Aug 29, '10; Posts: 619 (31% Liked) ; Likes: 334
CRNA; from US
Specialty: 4 year(s) of experience in critcal care, CRNA

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  • Apr 24

    Quote from bartmc1
    I'm in my second semester of nursing school. It was highly competitive program to get into and I am very proud to be here. I am a 39 y/o father of 5, happily married and I work 36 hours a weekend. I am perturbed by a fellow male vet. He currently serves in the army reserves. I have done my time in. This guy is constantly demanding special considerations such as additional study time after a weekend drill and he'll make up appointments regarding service so he can skip clinicals or at least leave early. Am I wrong for getting mad because he is getting away with it as well as I don't believe I want a fellow nurse abusing circumstances after we graduate. More importantly I feel this is feeding something deeper. He dosent seem to belong to the same set of rules as the rest of us. Any advise?
    Vent and let it go.

  • Feb 24

    Quote from ruler of kolob
    You would be OK with a part time neruosurgeon working on your brain?
    What's wrong with someone that works a few days a week? I work with plenty of CRNAs that work 2-3 days a week for various reasons, all of which are none of the business of ad-coms.

  • Feb 24

    Quote from bread angel
    It is well advised for you to get a lot of experience as a newly graduated CRNA. That experience is going to be at a full service hospital and later on you can move to an ASC.

    If you are asking these questions because you don't want to work full time in anesthesia, that is your choice, but I would let the admissions committees know this. They would probably rather admit someone who is not setting conditions so early in the career.
    Who cares what the admissions committee knows about your future employment? It should not be a concern to them. If you are qualified and a good fit, then let it be.

  • Jan 7

    Quote from piratenurse0226

    Just a heads up, have you thought of going into a surgical or cvicu? Just asking because if you want to pursue CRNA, they will only take adult ICU exp no nicu exp. if you're serious about applying I would find an adult unit in your hospital to get into.
    Schools decide what experience they take. Critical care is the requirement. I attend school with a PICU and NICU nurse. Some places also allow ER.

  • Oct 29 '17

    Quote from offlabel
    Any non physician anesthetists, whether individually or corporately, one day realize they don't need to have their hand held by a doctor to do anesthesia. CRNA's knew that very early on and AA's are beginning to realize this now. One day there will be such a thing as a "militant AA" as far as anesthesiologists are concerned, if that entity doesn't already exist.

    The difference is that AA's practice at the pleasure of their state's board of medicine and can be dealt a lethal blow over a weekend. CRNA's are credentialed completely independently of any physician organization and as such are free to pursue or not pursue varying degrees of "independence" as they see fit.

    Take away? AA's need to play nice, regardless of the skill and experience they bring to the table. CRNA's don't.
    The problem with AAs being militant and wanting to break free is that they can not do this without going back to school and switching professions. They literally cannot practice independent of a anesthesiologist.

  • Oct 29 '17

    Quote from offlabel
    Any non physician anesthetists, whether individually or corporately, one day realize they don't need to have their hand held by a doctor to do anesthesia. CRNA's knew that very early on and AA's are beginning to realize this now. One day there will be such a thing as a "militant AA" as far as anesthesiologists are concerned, if that entity doesn't already exist.

    The difference is that AA's practice at the pleasure of their state's board of medicine and can be dealt a lethal blow over a weekend. CRNA's are credentialed completely independently of any physician organization and as such are free to pursue or not pursue varying degrees of "independence" as they see fit.

    Take away? AA's need to play nice, regardless of the skill and experience they bring to the table. CRNA's don't.
    The problem with AAs being militant and wanting to break free is that they can not do this without going back to school and switching professions. They literally cannot practice independent of a anesthesiologist.

  • Oct 29 '17

    Quote from offlabel
    Any non physician anesthetists, whether individually or corporately, one day realize they don't need to have their hand held by a doctor to do anesthesia. CRNA's knew that very early on and AA's are beginning to realize this now. One day there will be such a thing as a "militant AA" as far as anesthesiologists are concerned, if that entity doesn't already exist.

    The difference is that AA's practice at the pleasure of their state's board of medicine and can be dealt a lethal blow over a weekend. CRNA's are credentialed completely independently of any physician organization and as such are free to pursue or not pursue varying degrees of "independence" as they see fit.

    Take away? AA's need to play nice, regardless of the skill and experience they bring to the table. CRNA's don't.
    The problem with AAs being militant and wanting to break free is that they can not do this without going back to school and switching professions. They literally cannot practice independent of a anesthesiologist.

  • Jun 4 '17

    I believe he stated that 72k was after taxes on his RN job.



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