Latest Comments by heron21

Latest Comments by heron21

heron21 1,877 Views

Joined Aug 24, '10. Posts: 35 (14% Liked) Likes: 5

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  • 0

    Great article! Ah! My dream job! I worked as an ICU Tech for a year and a half while in Nursing School, then landed my first full-time RN job at a crazy busy Med-Surg floor. With up to 7 patients as a new nurse, I can't even remember my patients' first names off the top of my head, let alone their medical issues or their latest vitals. If I had the time, I would read through each patient's chart and medical history to understand the pathophysiology of their illnesses. I would take the time to TEACH my patients and families about their condition. I would love to know the ins-and -outs of my patients. I would love to work as an ICU nurse some day....

    I'm only 5 months into my nursing career. Believe me, I have very much to learn still, but could any of you offer any advice for a path to ICU RN for me?

  • 1
    Arcadia73 likes this.

    As a new grad with BSN, I was offered $29/hr for days (plus $2/hr for weekends) in December 2012. There is no negotiation when you're a new grad here. I was VERY lucky and happy to have been offered so I took it without resistance. This is in Middlesex county at an acute care hospital. This was also not a residency program; however I was given 8 weeks with preceptor on the floor, plus 2 weeks in classroom including an IV course.

  • 1
    bigp71 likes this.

    Unless you are applying to a facility where you completed your clinical, then I would not have listed your clinical sites. All nursing programs require clinicals, so your clinical list does nothing to let you stand out, UNLESS, again, if you can show to the potential employer that "I completed a clinical HERE at your facility and loved it so much that I want to WORK HERE."

    Your certification list is impressive. Did you utilize these skills as an Orderly? For example, did you draw blood, perform EKG's etc.? If so, specifically list this under your employment as an Orderly. With that said, volunteer experience can be a great highlight on your resume, but we can't tell what you did there exactly. Try to list accomplishments, if you can, rather than simple job descriptions. Be specific about skills you have done, or have experience in (i.e., don't say "bedside procedures" and simply state examples in parenthesis-- It almost downplays these valuable experiences!). Instead, say something like, " Assist nurse in bedside procedures including care for Stages I-IV ulcers,.....X, Y, Z." And of course, include skills that you were able to do independently, like, " Assist in patient ambulation, hygiene care, X,Y,Z. Removal of peripheral IV's, foley catheters (if you did these), X, Y, Z...."

    Remember in a resume, it's not so much what you've done, but what you've accomplished. Show off your successes! Brag a little (or a lot) about what you can do, your proven skills! Good luck to you!

  • 1
    Nursing2102 likes this.

    Job market is super tough for new grads especially in NJ/NY area. My recommendation is to start networking DURING your clinicals. That's how I got my job as a new grad. I emailed a nurse manager on a unit where I completed one of my last clinicals and I was scheduled an interview and quickly offered the job BEFORE it was even posted! Obviously this means that you need to make a great impression during clinicals, ask about the facility and about potential job opportunities. Be interested in them first, then they may get some interest in you!

    Also, WORK as a tech, nursing assistant or anything NOW in the setting you want to be in as a nurse. Again, if you make a good impression, your fellow colleagues who are also nurses, hiring managers, etc. can serve as excellent recommendations, references and maybe help you land your first RN job. Network, network, network. Simply applying online will get you NO WHERE. (Take it from someone who sent apps to about 50-60 positions in 2 months!). Hopefully in 2 years, the market will get better for you!

  • 0

    My advice is also to stay in Ohio. After all, the Ohio job gave you back the offer that you originally rescinded. I don't suggest burning any bridges before you start your RN career. Is the OHio job also a Nurse Residency program? If you did very well in your RN program independently, you will likely not need a residency program.

  • 0

    I am a new grad with my BSN and passed my boards a month ago today. Since then, I have applied to 30 different hospital and LTACH positions that are as far as an hour drive from me. Not a single call-back, let alone an interview. I attended a career fair, followed up with the recruiters, rediscovered my LinkedIn account, got my ACLS cert and NOTHING. I'm at my wits end here. It seems 98% of RN jobs require minimum a year of experience. I have 6 months experience as a PCT, 6 years as Unit Secretary and none as a Nurse, but VERY eager to start. I realize that its only been a month, but I'm afraid I'm be losing skills and knowledge the longer that I am not working as an RN. What else can I be doing to let my application emerge from HR's giant pile? What other type of settings can I be looking at, besides nursing homes? I've been checking on facilities' websites directly. Any suggestions are welcomed.

    Just looking for a chance.

  • 1
    oluchika likes this.

    I think an email formatted as a formal letter would be appropriate and much quicker delivery if you are crunched for time. Have you scheduled your shadowing time on the unit? You could include the days/times that you can come in next week at the closing of the email. Good luck to you!

  • 0

    Definitely invest in a decent suit, in black or navy, or other neutral color. Assuming that you would be a similar size, that suit will be timeless that you can wear over and over for professional meetings, like interviews! Good luck to you.

  • 0

    Hi All,

    Like many of you skimming this section, I am currently updating my resume for upcoming career fairs and job applications. I recently passed my NCLEX (from Quick results service, result 48 hours after test) and delving into the tough world of job hunting for the coveted first RN job.

    Please review my resume and let me know what you think. HONESTLY. What are your first impressions within 10-20 seconds of looking at it? I just get dizzy staring at my own resume for hours!! I would be willing to return the favor and critique yours too. (Once upon a time, I was a hiring manager too!).

    Thanks so much!

  • 0

    Hi Oneday...I am not applying as I am already enrolled in the ABSN program now. It is in fact impossible to work full time. There is at least one online class per semester. I'm not sure about the RN--> BSN program, but the ABSN is only 14 months with up to 20 students in the program.

  • 0

    The class equivalent for HIP is Interpersonal Communications class which can be taken in any community college. I do not recommend taking the challenge exam. I would email any of the admins for the challenge exam info, including the syllabus and textbook. Good luck.

  • 0

    chiasmus-

    I graduated with honors from RU in 2003. I took 3 pre-reqs (Microbio, Nutrition, Interpersonal Comm) at a community college last year and earned A's in those classes. All other pre-reqs were taken as part of my first undergrad degree. From what I can remember, my grades back then were: Bio 1(C--> first semester in college, didnt know how to study=\), Bio 2 (B), Anat/Physio (A/B+), Psych classes (A), Stat/Calc/Computers (A), Chem 1-2 (B+)...

  • 0

    I work about 16-20 hours per week while in the ABSN program at RU. Daytime work is IMPOSSIBLE. My work schedules are usually weekends. The first semester (Summer) was incredibly difficult. I would allow from a lot of flexibility in your work schedule if I were you.

  • 0

    I'm in the ABSN program now. Sounds like you may need to take an english course. I recommend emailing one of the Admins (in Newark or NB) and meet with them to review your transcript. They can give an unofficial evaluation of your transcripts from all colleges you've gone to. Also the ABSN is in BOTH campuses, varies per semester (Summer, Spring is in Newark; Fall in NB).

  • 0

    I'm currently in the RU ABSN program and can attest to the program requirements. While they cannot advertise preference for RU grads, it is known that this is the case. As it was explained to me, the college of nursing can confirm that the candidate has succeeded in completing the rigors and high standards of a Rutgers degree. In their eyes, this is a major a highlight in your application and reflects your ability to succeed in a VERY intense program.

    Previous RU students (if you've taken any course in Rutgers or completed a degree) completes a different application, called "Re-enrollment Application." It does have a section for a personal statement, which is where I mentioned my work in the health field and other qualifications. I was told that GPA lower than 3.0 are not even considered. My cumulative GPA in my previous degree (Exercise Science) was 3.6. I believe Challenge exams are no longer being offered, so that means that all pre-reqs must be completed before the program starts.

    Now, if someone who has a science degree from an Ivy league, (but GPA is 3.3) may not necessarily be over or under a Rutgers grad. They do consider other factors.

    Let me know if you have other questions about the program.


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