Latest Likes For Mookiepsychnp

Latest Likes For Mookiepsychnp

Mookiepsychnp 1,144 Views

Joined Jul 18, '10. Posts: 35 (20% Liked) Likes: 10

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  • Jan 17

    Quote from PsychGuy
    Right now psych is hot. Supply v. Demand. Southern US. Start 150k. Everybody and their cousin wants ED. I used to work ED as a RN. Never saw the appeal. I liked urgent care better - more realistic, existential life problems that all clinicians should understand and be able to treat.
    Everybody in their cousin wants psych now too! lol Every NP student I know (NorthEast) is going back to school for psych NP. Don't know how much longer we will be considered hot. Pay is definitely geographic. Everyone is not going to earn $150K or even close. I'm not that far from NYC and they are not being offered that. You were very fortunate.

  • Jan 10

    I definitely have my own no matter what the company provides. They may decide to settle a case, which would have my name attached even if innocent. I always feel better safe than sorry.

  • Nov 22 '15

    Quote from alexb45
    I have been a Family Nurse Practitioner for almost ten years now, and have been working with a plastic/cosmetic surgery group. My training as an FNP did not prepare me for this role as there were no surgical rotations in my program. I had previous OR experience as an RN and was fortunate that one of the surgeons were willing to hire and train me as a new NP for their practice. Yes, there definitely was a learning curve in the first year or two but I think your success depends on the willingness of your physician to train you in your given field.

    I see a dermatologist who is an FNP, yet there isn’t a Board Certified Dermatologic Nurse Practitioner, and I couldn't be happier with the care I receive. I have another colleague who works with an interventional radiology group, and from my understanding there is no certification for that specialty either, yet she provides excellent care. Most typical family nurse practitioner programs offer little to no training in most of the specialties that NPs work in, yet they all have positive patient outcomes. I can go on and on.

    IMO IF the psychiatrist you will be working with will provide you the necessary training and not throw you out there on your own right away, I say go for it. A lot of the knowledge you will obtain will be from on the job training. Depending on your state if you will be collaborating with your physician, I am almost 100% certain that the physician will not put their license at risk by allowing you to practice without supervision until they are certain you are comfortable and competent to provide excellent and safe care for your patients.

    In my years working with a variety of other medical professionals, I have found that PAs don't seem to have this issue among their profession. From my understanding, their training encompasses all aspects of medicine plus they are required to do rotations through most specialties. Yes, PAs have specialty certifications they can obtain however they don’t have "turf wars" between specialties as most Nurse Practitioners do. If there is a board certification in your speciality I absolutely encourage you to go for it. IMO as advanced practice nurses we are doing ourselves a disservice by having these "turf wars" between specialties, by telling each other "we cant do this or that." I understand the training for the FNP may be limited in its scope, however this may signal a change on how all nurse practitioners are trained/educated. As healthcare changes we also have to change and work together as a profession.
    This issue really has absolutely nothing to do with "turf wars" but it is all about scope of practice and malpractice. If you are a FNP you are still practicing within your scope of practice if a cardiologist or dermatologist decides to give you advanced training and you decide to work in that specialty. If you however decide to take a position working with a psychiatrist and treating mental health disorders as a FNP you are practicing outside your scope of practice which leaves you vulnerable for lawsuits. I am certified as an Adult psych np and I had a private practice try to convince me to see children stating that the psychiatrist could supervise me and I could take CMEs in child psychiatry. Well I contacted my malpractice provider and they informed me that if I practice outside of my scope which is adults only, they would not represent me if I were to find myself involved in a lawsuit. Providers need to recognize that even if an organization or physician tells you it is alright for you to provide services that you may not be sure falls within your scope of practice, it is your responsibility to find out if you are really protected. I'm sure when we start seeing posts about people being caught up working outside their scope because such and such said it was alright or they prefer that specialty, this will become less of an issue. As the NP field grows so will the lawsuits!

  • Nov 11 '15

    Quote from alexb45
    I have been a Family Nurse Practitioner for almost ten years now, and have been working with a plastic/cosmetic surgery group. My training as an FNP did not prepare me for this role as there were no surgical rotations in my program. I had previous OR experience as an RN and was fortunate that one of the surgeons were willing to hire and train me as a new NP for their practice. Yes, there definitely was a learning curve in the first year or two but I think your success depends on the willingness of your physician to train you in your given field.

    I see a dermatologist who is an FNP, yet there isn’t a Board Certified Dermatologic Nurse Practitioner, and I couldn't be happier with the care I receive. I have another colleague who works with an interventional radiology group, and from my understanding there is no certification for that specialty either, yet she provides excellent care. Most typical family nurse practitioner programs offer little to no training in most of the specialties that NPs work in, yet they all have positive patient outcomes. I can go on and on.

    IMO IF the psychiatrist you will be working with will provide you the necessary training and not throw you out there on your own right away, I say go for it. A lot of the knowledge you will obtain will be from on the job training. Depending on your state if you will be collaborating with your physician, I am almost 100% certain that the physician will not put their license at risk by allowing you to practice without supervision until they are certain you are comfortable and competent to provide excellent and safe care for your patients.

    In my years working with a variety of other medical professionals, I have found that PAs don't seem to have this issue among their profession. From my understanding, their training encompasses all aspects of medicine plus they are required to do rotations through most specialties. Yes, PAs have specialty certifications they can obtain however they don’t have "turf wars" between specialties as most Nurse Practitioners do. If there is a board certification in your speciality I absolutely encourage you to go for it. IMO as advanced practice nurses we are doing ourselves a disservice by having these "turf wars" between specialties, by telling each other "we cant do this or that." I understand the training for the FNP may be limited in its scope, however this may signal a change on how all nurse practitioners are trained/educated. As healthcare changes we also have to change and work together as a profession.
    This issue really has absolutely nothing to do with "turf wars" but it is all about scope of practice and malpractice. If you are a FNP you are still practicing within your scope of practice if a cardiologist or dermatologist decides to give you advanced training and you decide to work in that specialty. If you however decide to take a position working with a psychiatrist and treating mental health disorders as a FNP you are practicing outside your scope of practice which leaves you vulnerable for lawsuits. I am certified as an Adult psych np and I had a private practice try to convince me to see children stating that the psychiatrist could supervise me and I could take CMEs in child psychiatry. Well I contacted my malpractice provider and they informed me that if I practice outside of my scope which is adults only, they would not represent me if I were to find myself involved in a lawsuit. Providers need to recognize that even if an organization or physician tells you it is alright for you to provide services that you may not be sure falls within your scope of practice, it is your responsibility to find out if you are really protected. I'm sure when we start seeing posts about people being caught up working outside their scope because such and such said it was alright or they prefer that specialty, this will become less of an issue. As the NP field grows so will the lawsuits!

  • Nov 10 '15

    Quote from alexb45
    I have been a Family Nurse Practitioner for almost ten years now, and have been working with a plastic/cosmetic surgery group. My training as an FNP did not prepare me for this role as there were no surgical rotations in my program. I had previous OR experience as an RN and was fortunate that one of the surgeons were willing to hire and train me as a new NP for their practice. Yes, there definitely was a learning curve in the first year or two but I think your success depends on the willingness of your physician to train you in your given field.

    I see a dermatologist who is an FNP, yet there isn’t a Board Certified Dermatologic Nurse Practitioner, and I couldn't be happier with the care I receive. I have another colleague who works with an interventional radiology group, and from my understanding there is no certification for that specialty either, yet she provides excellent care. Most typical family nurse practitioner programs offer little to no training in most of the specialties that NPs work in, yet they all have positive patient outcomes. I can go on and on.

    IMO IF the psychiatrist you will be working with will provide you the necessary training and not throw you out there on your own right away, I say go for it. A lot of the knowledge you will obtain will be from on the job training. Depending on your state if you will be collaborating with your physician, I am almost 100% certain that the physician will not put their license at risk by allowing you to practice without supervision until they are certain you are comfortable and competent to provide excellent and safe care for your patients.

    In my years working with a variety of other medical professionals, I have found that PAs don't seem to have this issue among their profession. From my understanding, their training encompasses all aspects of medicine plus they are required to do rotations through most specialties. Yes, PAs have specialty certifications they can obtain however they don’t have "turf wars" between specialties as most Nurse Practitioners do. If there is a board certification in your speciality I absolutely encourage you to go for it. IMO as advanced practice nurses we are doing ourselves a disservice by having these "turf wars" between specialties, by telling each other "we cant do this or that." I understand the training for the FNP may be limited in its scope, however this may signal a change on how all nurse practitioners are trained/educated. As healthcare changes we also have to change and work together as a profession.
    This issue really has absolutely nothing to do with "turf wars" but it is all about scope of practice and malpractice. If you are a FNP you are still practicing within your scope of practice if a cardiologist or dermatologist decides to give you advanced training and you decide to work in that specialty. If you however decide to take a position working with a psychiatrist and treating mental health disorders as a FNP you are practicing outside your scope of practice which leaves you vulnerable for lawsuits. I am certified as an Adult psych np and I had a private practice try to convince me to see children stating that the psychiatrist could supervise me and I could take CMEs in child psychiatry. Well I contacted my malpractice provider and they informed me that if I practice outside of my scope which is adults only, they would not represent me if I were to find myself involved in a lawsuit. Providers need to recognize that even if an organization or physician tells you it is alright for you to provide services that you may not be sure falls within your scope of practice, it is your responsibility to find out if you are really protected. I'm sure when we start seeing posts about people being caught up working outside their scope because such and such said it was alright or they prefer that specialty, this will become less of an issue. As the NP field grows so will the lawsuits!



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