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gettingbsn2msn 8,148 Views

Joined Jul 6, '10. Posts: 519 (47% Liked) Likes: 810

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  • Jul 22

    The other thing I noted is that the APRN in the scenario introduced herself as a "Doctor" which I find both pretentious and disingenuous. While she may have a doctoral degree she is not a medical Dr. which is the implication of her introduction. This is just another example of how the "Educated Elite" try to hoodwink the poor dumb rabble. Most people are perfectly capable of understanding that they are seeing an experienced and highly trained professional but they are also within their rights to ask to see a "Real Doctor". I love the whole idea of becoming MHNP because of how underserved the psychiatric population is. They are swimmers in a sea of sharks and need more lifeguards with eyes on the water. I have had great experiences with NP's over the years but some NPs do not understand their role in the system. They are not Medical Doctors and should not pretend to be such.


    Hppy

  • Jul 22

    could have been written better but it isnt lies.

    Not as bad as the "studies" provided by nursing organisations trying to say they can 100% doctor with less education and more online discussion posting.

  • Jul 22

    Antagonism between NPs and physicians exist everywhere. I don't think a solution will come to passim this decade. Personally, I come across physicians like this all the time and what I do is find employment where they truly welcome mid levels.

  • Jul 22

    Hi, I have my MPH and ADN. I went to graduate school straight after getting my Bachelor's in Community Health. I initially wanted to work for the CDC in public health. I couldn't find a job with my MPH, so I went back to school and earned my ADN. I don't think having my MPH has any affect on anything. I have gotten management positions in nursing due to me having my MPH, since I don't have my BSN as of yet. I am currently in Walden University BSN/MSN-NP program. So in my opinion there is no particular benefit of getting your MPH unless you want to work in public health specifically. But I can say that I do not feel my MPH was a waste of time and that it does help me in my current nurse management position. But if you want your NP license, then don't waste your time getting a MPH unless you just enjoy going to school.

  • Jul 22

    Quote from 2bNotAnotherMaleNurse7
    Well they said it was more functional medicine. Ordering DME, trigger point injections, functional assessments, etc..
    True functional medicine is not doing DMEs, trigger point injections, functional assessments, etc. This is more of a physical medicine route (possibly chiropractic). Functional medicine is...patient comes in with fatigue, weight gain, "brain fog", etc. and you evaluate for nutritional deficiencies, thyroid, adrenal, sugar problems.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from hospicenp
    One of the worst states: Florida. Prescriptive authority does not include ANY scheduled drugs, which is a real hassle for me since I work in hospice. We have to file our MD protocol annually. We constantly fight the Florida Medical Association in the legislature, they introduce bills to limit us even further and would get away with it if we aren't vigilant. If it weren't for the particular group I work with, I wouldn't be here.

    We are right there with you here in GA....

  • Jul 9

    Quote from futurenp89
    A lot of you who resent going into nursing act like it's too late to get out. Get out now before you become any more of a plague to this profession.
    You're funny. If all the unhappy, burnt out, dissatisfied nurses quit then there would be a catastrophic shortage of nurses! How about hospitals start treating their staff better with decent safe staffing ratios, working equipment, ceiling lifts, adequate supplies and support staff that might improve morale a whole hell of a lot! Just my opinion, but I'm sure many others would agree with me!

  • Jul 9

    Quote from sewersurfin
    no. I am not nurse material. I am going to start on a career change and am working on a graduate degree in history.
    Sounds fun, but what are you going to be able to do with a MA in history? Probably the best option would be teaching high school students as public teachers have the best benefits and retirement options. But professors that's another story. They have gone to 75% adjunct professors part time, paid by class vs tenured full time professors with benefits. It is not a good time to become a professor in America!

  • Jul 9

    Quote from Been there,done that
    35 years and now in a decent (work from home) position. I would not do it again.
    I believe nurses are worked like mules... to make money for the man.

    Is it too late to go to law school?
    No it's never too late, but law school isn't necessarily going to be the greener pasture - check out the cost of law school these days relative to the starting pay for an attorney...if you can find a job....there's a big over saturation of attorneys which has plummeted starting salaries.

  • Jul 9

    I have been a nurse for 46 years and nobody gives a dam.If I had been an MD that long people would revere me.

  • Jul 9

    Quote from JKL33
    What I would NOT do is steal from employees.

    Let me put this into perspective. I've been around long enough to remember a time when it was 100% acceptable to take an acetaminophen tablet from the employer's stock for personal use. Although I never needed to use this option, sometimes people did and it generally wasn't abused. From the employer's POV it helped the employee and enabled them to continue working.

    Business practices have changed. It is well-known now that it is not the employer's responsibility to provide things like this for the employee. If one were to take a $.02 tablet from the employer, they would be stealing. Any of us who experienced this change in trends has heard this line repeatedly.

    Now, please tell me how hiring someone at X dollars per hour to work X hours per week, and then, when it suits you, demanding that - as a condition of their continued employment - they sit at home at your beck and call for ZERO dollars (or a pittance, same difference) is not stealing. The market cost of "retaining" a skilled professional is not being paid. It's not even being acknowledged!

    There is NO attempt to be ethical with this practice. Fair compensation is not offered - I mean, wouldn't the employer also save money by paying only 60% or 50% of the usual wage? Although those figures still don't represent the terms under which the employee was hired, they are certainly more fair. I've also never heard of the employer providing a statement of financial donation to the employee who donates 4, 8, 12 hours' worth of time. Again, that doesn't really cover it, but it would at least be an acknowledgment and a gesture of integrity.

    Instead, what they are doing is taking 50% of the employment agreement and using it to their advantage: "You're on the schedule for this shift, we can tell you to stay home if we want to." FINE!!! The other 50% of that is that if you're going to say I'm on the schedule, that means you intended to pay me what we agreed upon, or you can take me off the schedule. You can't have it both ways.

    It's really pretty simple.
    I absolutely agree with the 'frog and the pot' analogy. This practice is stealing, unethical, and just another insult to all of the dedicated caregivers that are the true lifeblood of any hospital. As JKL33 pointed out, this practice, in effect 'deprofessionalizes' nursing-when was the last time you recall hearing of any professional not being fairly compensated for their time? Only when nurses organize or there is a mass, mass exodus and hospital administration loses lots of revenue because they can't adequately staff their beds, will this ever change. Here's an idea, how about trimming the salary or some of the fringe benefits of Mr Hospital CEO or perhaps, getting rid of some of the dead wood at the top?

  • Jul 1

    Brand: WonderWink tops and bottoms
    Comfort: Normal. After a few months of washes, they get a little bit more soft.
    Price: $44 for a top and special order tall bottom
    Required brand where you work: No required brand
    Durability: Excellent, only ripped one in three years of wearing this brand. I used to tear up Cherokee brand.
    Variety of colors (or do you have to wear a specific color): Navy blue because it's required for RNs.
    Antimicrobial: No
    Stain resistance: No
    Anything else: I love the pocket layout of both the top and bottom. The pant's cargo pocket is tight against the leg, it doesn't flop all over the place once I put in a few NS flushes. It really great to have found a brand and style number that I like, because it makes re-ordering so much easier. They aren't stylish, but neither am I, really.

  • May 26

    These type of statements strike me as some sort of spiritual ego trip. People will loudly proclaim how much they prayed, then let everyone know how blessed they are by God with all these positive things.

    What about someone who prays and prays for their child with cancer, and the child dies? Are they on the unfavorite list? And, what about those with good fortune, nice houses, good jobs, healthy children, who never pray?

  • May 26

    Sounds like she just doesn't like you enough to give you the schedule you want. It happens, is it fair?, no but it is just the way it goes. This is why a lot of RN's postpone having children (sometimes don't have any at all) and their relationships can be hard to balance (sometimes they end up divorced, or end up being single). It is hard to have a new baby, marriage and work nights. It is a sacrifice...

  • May 26

    The above posts say it well. You will have no success in claiming discrimination. I suggest you keep trying, so I voted "suck it up".

    Been there, done it. Had kids, which slowed my progression in my career in many ways. Day shift positions came and went d/t my parenting circumstances, even though I was clear I wanted to go to days. I found the opportunity, and the timing was right and I took it.

    Really, suck it up, take care of yourself and your baby and realize NO ONE can "have it all" at once. Another opportunity will arise when the timing is better.


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