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himilayaneyes, MSN, APRN 7,083 Views

Joined Jul 4, '10 - from 'Florida'. himilayaneyes is a ARNP. She has 'since 2008' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Critical Care/Coronary Care Unit,'. Posts: 502 (44% Liked) Likes: 664

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  • Dec 16 '16

    I do believe requiring all nurses to have ACLS is a trend in hospitals now. Yes, there is a code team at your hospital. However, if the patient needs something right away before the code team gets there who's going to give the drug...you can't if ur not ACLS certified. Codes do happen on a med-surg floor, labor and delivery, and so on. And although rare we have had two codes on my floor at the same time...so if med-surg happens to call a code at that time.....who's coming (not me...plus the people not in the code are watching the other patients)...hope there are some ACLS certified nurses over there to run the code. Every health care worker needs to know what to do. This also decreases liability for the hospital. It's a good thing, it'll save more lives. Instead of pts being in unstable SVT on a med-surg floor on the other side of the hospital, but the ICU is on the other side of the hospital (a journey at my facility). Why wait for the patient to get worse when those med-surg nurses can do something about it right then and there? I'm all for it. It's all about patient safety Plus, ACLS isn't that big of a deal. I just renewed mine. Since it'll be required for your job, they should pay for the class and pay you to attend....all good things in my book.

    P.S. A lot of hospital are moving towards cardiac monitors being on every floor as well. Continuous telemetry for all patients. Any area with monitors must have ACLS certified nurses.

  • Dec 16 '16

    I do believe requiring all nurses to have ACLS is a trend in hospitals now. Yes, there is a code team at your hospital. However, if the patient needs something right away before the code team gets there who's going to give the drug...you can't if ur not ACLS certified. Codes do happen on a med-surg floor, labor and delivery, and so on. And although rare we have had two codes on my floor at the same time...so if med-surg happens to call a code at that time.....who's coming (not me...plus the people not in the code are watching the other patients)...hope there are some ACLS certified nurses over there to run the code. Every health care worker needs to know what to do. This also decreases liability for the hospital. It's a good thing, it'll save more lives. Instead of pts being in unstable SVT on a med-surg floor on the other side of the hospital, but the ICU is on the other side of the hospital (a journey at my facility). Why wait for the patient to get worse when those med-surg nurses can do something about it right then and there? I'm all for it. It's all about patient safety Plus, ACLS isn't that big of a deal. I just renewed mine. Since it'll be required for your job, they should pay for the class and pay you to attend....all good things in my book.

    P.S. A lot of hospital are moving towards cardiac monitors being on every floor as well. Continuous telemetry for all patients. Any area with monitors must have ACLS certified nurses.

  • Sep 18 '16

    If your friend wants to be a nurse, she better forget about her dreams of having acrylic nails. Does she understand why the CDC doesn't want nails to be longer than a certain length. Deadly Medicine - Kids & Family Life, Medical Conditions, Coping and Overcoming Illness : People.com That's the link about the nurse who accidentally killed babies with the pseudomonas infection underneath her artificial nails...Your friend should care more about patient safety than her nails. If they're that important to her, then she definitely doesn't want a job in healthcare period.

  • Jul 10 '16

    This patient is gonna die. Good luck.

  • Mar 14 '16

    If you're already a nurse, I suggest you work per-diem somewhere or even better for a staffing agency. Most staffing agencies require you to work once every 90 days while a lot of per-diem placed require 3-4x/month. However, they also require at least one year of experience. If you're not a nurse yet and just want to use nursing to "fall back on" as you say...I honestly suggest you don't become a nurse. It's really easy to get burned out in this profession, particularly for those who didn't really want to be nurses and just wanted financial stability. My advice is to follow your dream...and if your dream isn't nursing...don't do yourself (or patients) a disservice b/c you'll only regret it in the end. Good luck.

  • Jan 25 '16

    Love the astronaut thing...hilarious. People definitely throw around the term nurse too lightly. You hear secretaries calling themselves nurses b/c they work at a hospital or MD office...you feel like saying ok nurse come assess this patient and perform CPR on the one who's crashing nurse just to see the looks on their faces...better yet have them explain everything that's going on to patient families. It should be against the law to call yourself a nurse if you're not a licensed nurse.



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