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Rnis 3,357 Views

Joined Jun 22, '10. Posts: 116 (51% Liked) Likes: 137

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  • Feb 15

    I have never started a new job that i don't have buyers regret 1-2 months in. That is kind of normal. I have always stayed and ended up liking the job in the end. At my current job, the other providers were great but it took me a few years to win over some of the clinical staff. I just did my job and tried to be friendly. Just like you are adjusting to a new job other workers are adjusting to how you change the culture. While I don't think I would stay at a place that is hostile long term.............i think one month into a new job AND a new profession is too soon to throw in the towel. Good luck!

  • Feb 14

    HOw many patients would you be seeing a day. I can't imagine you would see enough patients to even make that worth your time.

  • Feb 14

    HOw many patients would you be seeing a day. I can't imagine you would see enough patients to even make that worth your time.

  • Feb 13

    I have never started a new job that i don't have buyers regret 1-2 months in. That is kind of normal. I have always stayed and ended up liking the job in the end. At my current job, the other providers were great but it took me a few years to win over some of the clinical staff. I just did my job and tried to be friendly. Just like you are adjusting to a new job other workers are adjusting to how you change the culture. While I don't think I would stay at a place that is hostile long term.............i think one month into a new job AND a new profession is too soon to throw in the towel. Good luck!

  • Feb 12

    I have never started a new job that i don't have buyers regret 1-2 months in. That is kind of normal. I have always stayed and ended up liking the job in the end. At my current job, the other providers were great but it took me a few years to win over some of the clinical staff. I just did my job and tried to be friendly. Just like you are adjusting to a new job other workers are adjusting to how you change the culture. While I don't think I would stay at a place that is hostile long term.............i think one month into a new job AND a new profession is too soon to throw in the towel. Good luck!

  • Feb 12

    I have never started a new job that i don't have buyers regret 1-2 months in. That is kind of normal. I have always stayed and ended up liking the job in the end. At my current job, the other providers were great but it took me a few years to win over some of the clinical staff. I just did my job and tried to be friendly. Just like you are adjusting to a new job other workers are adjusting to how you change the culture. While I don't think I would stay at a place that is hostile long term.............i think one month into a new job AND a new profession is too soon to throw in the towel. Good luck!

  • Feb 11

    I have never started a new job that i don't have buyers regret 1-2 months in. That is kind of normal. I have always stayed and ended up liking the job in the end. At my current job, the other providers were great but it took me a few years to win over some of the clinical staff. I just did my job and tried to be friendly. Just like you are adjusting to a new job other workers are adjusting to how you change the culture. While I don't think I would stay at a place that is hostile long term.............i think one month into a new job AND a new profession is too soon to throw in the towel. Good luck!

  • Feb 11

    Quote from djmatte
    The hard part about specialties is they don't give you any more expertise in family medicine/Primary care than you had before. So later on you will still find the same hurdles you had before. 40 patients per day is excessive and there is genuine concern when it's stated up front the majority of you job will be med refills. As an RN, I've had extensive pain background and I've received many requests to consider pain positions because of this. While they're tempting and could land me some new skills, I'd rather not pigeon hole myself out the gate. I haven't checked Vegas, but as suggested above there are lots of jobs out west. Check out practicelink. That website's been the most productive source for me.
    This! This isn't going to solve your problem. I understand your frustration but definitely don't lock yourself into a 2 year contract. At 40 patients a day.......they are making a killing off you if they aren't providing benefits. If you are willing to move, there are jobs out there. Best wishes.

  • Feb 10

    I have never started a new job that i don't have buyers regret 1-2 months in. That is kind of normal. I have always stayed and ended up liking the job in the end. At my current job, the other providers were great but it took me a few years to win over some of the clinical staff. I just did my job and tried to be friendly. Just like you are adjusting to a new job other workers are adjusting to how you change the culture. While I don't think I would stay at a place that is hostile long term.............i think one month into a new job AND a new profession is too soon to throw in the towel. Good luck!

  • Feb 9

    Serving as an advisor for np students. typically it is reviewing their work once a week and doing a site visit. Not a ton of money, but also different and not too time consuming.

  • Jan 27

    I became an APN on the spur of the moment.....was literally a few months away from starting grad school to be a nurse educator and changed my mind at the urging of a colleague who was also in grad to be an FNP with the idea that being an FNP would be more versatile in terms of the job market when i graduated. Once I started the advanced study and practicums....I fell in the love with role and haven't looked back. I don't think there is a "right" or "wrong" motivation as long as you are capable of providing quality care and performing the role you aspire to. My program was tough and there was no "churning" out Nps.

    To touch on what op stated, I have seen time and time again that nurses are toughest on fellow nurses. Whether it be the new grad struggling to acclimate to a new floor.... or the new advance practice nurse trying to navigate the complexities of transitioning to a very different role. NP's succeeding and becoming more utilized in the healthcare system is a positive thing for the nursing profession as a whole..... I love that I make better money, have better hours, and am treated better than i was in the bedside nursing role.....I don't think those are bad motivations for directing your career path.

  • Jan 3

    I became an APN on the spur of the moment.....was literally a few months away from starting grad school to be a nurse educator and changed my mind at the urging of a colleague who was also in grad to be an FNP with the idea that being an FNP would be more versatile in terms of the job market when i graduated. Once I started the advanced study and practicums....I fell in the love with role and haven't looked back. I don't think there is a "right" or "wrong" motivation as long as you are capable of providing quality care and performing the role you aspire to. My program was tough and there was no "churning" out Nps.

    To touch on what op stated, I have seen time and time again that nurses are toughest on fellow nurses. Whether it be the new grad struggling to acclimate to a new floor.... or the new advance practice nurse trying to navigate the complexities of transitioning to a very different role. NP's succeeding and becoming more utilized in the healthcare system is a positive thing for the nursing profession as a whole..... I love that I make better money, have better hours, and am treated better than i was in the bedside nursing role.....I don't think those are bad motivations for directing your career path.

  • Dec 30 '17

    Congrats! most people i know that have struggled to find positions weren't willing to re-locate, It's great you are so flexible! Good luck on your new adventure.

  • Dec 30 '17

    I became an APN on the spur of the moment.....was literally a few months away from starting grad school to be a nurse educator and changed my mind at the urging of a colleague who was also in grad to be an FNP with the idea that being an FNP would be more versatile in terms of the job market when i graduated. Once I started the advanced study and practicums....I fell in the love with role and haven't looked back. I don't think there is a "right" or "wrong" motivation as long as you are capable of providing quality care and performing the role you aspire to. My program was tough and there was no "churning" out Nps.

    To touch on what op stated, I have seen time and time again that nurses are toughest on fellow nurses. Whether it be the new grad struggling to acclimate to a new floor.... or the new advance practice nurse trying to navigate the complexities of transitioning to a very different role. NP's succeeding and becoming more utilized in the healthcare system is a positive thing for the nursing profession as a whole..... I love that I make better money, have better hours, and am treated better than i was in the bedside nursing role.....I don't think those are bad motivations for directing your career path.

  • Dec 30 '17

    I became an APN on the spur of the moment.....was literally a few months away from starting grad school to be a nurse educator and changed my mind at the urging of a colleague who was also in grad to be an FNP with the idea that being an FNP would be more versatile in terms of the job market when i graduated. Once I started the advanced study and practicums....I fell in the love with role and haven't looked back. I don't think there is a "right" or "wrong" motivation as long as you are capable of providing quality care and performing the role you aspire to. My program was tough and there was no "churning" out Nps.

    To touch on what op stated, I have seen time and time again that nurses are toughest on fellow nurses. Whether it be the new grad struggling to acclimate to a new floor.... or the new advance practice nurse trying to navigate the complexities of transitioning to a very different role. NP's succeeding and becoming more utilized in the healthcare system is a positive thing for the nursing profession as a whole..... I love that I make better money, have better hours, and am treated better than i was in the bedside nursing role.....I don't think those are bad motivations for directing your career path.


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