Content That SoldierNurse22 Likes

SoldierNurse22, BSN, RN, EMT-B 51,562 Views

Joined Mar 29, '10. Posts: 2,232 (67% Liked) Likes: 7,012

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  • Dec 2

    L&D is traditionally a coveted specialty. If a unit needs an experienced nurse who will need minimal orientation, that's who they are going to look for. If you truly want an L&D job, you need to expand the search- outside your current facility, look at possibly relocating, look into getting experience in a related unit.

  • Dec 2

    The ones that drive me nuts are the ones that quail at having to take care of people. They want to be managers and tell people how to do their jobs when they haven't ever done the job.

  • Dec 2

    You make a good point that I had not considered. I spent 29 years at the bedside from med surg to ICU and now have been in the PACU the past year and a half and plan to retire from there. In line with your thoughts is also the fact that all the small community hospitals are bought up and closed down which adds to the loss of community caring. I guess I'm at the end of nursing at a good time.

  • Dec 2

    I've been nursing for 25 years and I've seen the changes over nearly 3 decades. What is different now is that medicine has become part of a corporation. It's not healthcare in the old sense of the word. It's now about staffing numbers and costs and heads in beds. All this translates into management squeezing every last drop they can out of every nurse, bed space and stock item. Nurses are pulled, floated, called off, given a bunch of different admits as patients are constantly moved to a cheaper level of care. Nursing has become extremely hard work. Not that it wasn't before, but it was honest hard work. These days it's just stressful. When I was a young nurse I would come in to work, get an assignment and leave with the same assignment, never floated, had lunch and tea breaks and if the unit was quiet I wouldn't be sent home without pay, I'd help the other nurses. That doesn't happen anymore and so nurses have gotten clued into this and want more autonomy, better working conditions and less stress. It's inevitable that this has happened actually. Administration have created this with their business practices. And me...after 25 years...am in school to be an NP because I have had enough.

  • Nov 27

    Quote from Dianna11
    By constantly scoffing at me in class, literally almost laughing out loud when I was asking for clarifications and it culminated with her approaching me and telling me that "she has a problem with me" because I was asking too many questions.
    That's not "not liking someone". I was paying the same tuition as she did , no need to bellitle me.
    Also, same person harrased my friend who is AA , in clinicals. They constantly snickered and laughed behind her back. SAME people.

    Please don't make excuses for them. I wouldn't have brought it up if it wasn't serious. Screw bullies
    I hope you calmly and confidently told her hell would freeze over before you would give a rat's patoot what she thinks of you.

    Bullies like weak victims. It really ruins their whole plan when someone stands up to them with cool authority.

  • Nov 27

    Also, as an aside, I've never seen anyone on here deny that there's bullying in nursing. It's just not exclusive to nursing. And the word bully is so overused that it's almost meaningless these days.

  • Nov 27

    Quote from Dianna11
    By constantly scoffing at me in class, literally almost laughing out loud when I was asking for clarifications and it culminated with her approaching me and telling me that "she has a problem with me" because I was asking too many questions.
    That's not "not liking someone". I was paying the same tuition as she did , no need to bellitle me.
    Also, same person harrased my friend who is AA , in clinicals. They constantly snickered and laughed behind her back. SAME people.

    Please don't make excuses for them. I wouldn't have brought it up if it wasn't serious. Screw bullies
    I'm not making excuses for anything/anyone, that's why I asked "how did she bully you?", because in your initial post the little information you shared didn't sound like bullying. I was asking for clarification because the word bully is thrown around excessively.

    It does sound like she's a jerk and I'm sorry she's making you miserable. The best advice I can give is to stand up for yourself - don't allow it to continue, especially in a school setting. There are bullies out there in the world (some are nurses), and the sooner you learn how to deal with them, the better off you'll be in the long run. You don't have to be mean, just firm and unapologetic.

    I will say that there is a girl in my A&P class that I don't care for because she never stops asking questions during lecture and it's really distracting. I'd never tell her how I feel, I don't sigh or roll my eyes or whatever, because I'm not a jerk. But I do wish she'd save the questions for the end of the lecture, or breaks just because of the sheer volume of them.

    Good luck. I hope things improve for you.

  • Nov 27

    In my younger, care-less days, had I been in possession of an alternate language, I would have given that person an earful and walked away with the last laugh, leaving him or her completely dumbfounded. Oh, how I've evolved over the years.

    Yes, there are bullies in nursing. One in particular comes to mind. This oncoming nurse wanted to tell me how my patient did during my shift. As I turned to walk away, she asked where I was going. I told her since she knew everything, there was no need for me to hang around. Other nurses heard the conversation and she was so humiliated that she burst into tears. Didn't have anymore problems from her again...at least, I didn't.

  • Nov 27

    Quote from Shookclays
    Um going up to someone and expressing your dislike for them is certainly harassment/bullying.
    I disagree. Without context, you really can't say one way or the other.

  • Nov 27

    I've caught more things from fellow staff who won't call in sick.

  • Nov 27

    Quote from Peteypab
    Maybe you are with a patient with bad diarrhea and you contract something like hep.
    I suggest you take a microbiology class to see how things are transmitted. Second, do you not think we wear protective gear and wash up constantly? Proper hand hygiene is a requirement to being a nurse.

    If you are having theses intense fears before starting nursing school l, I would speak to a counselor to deal with these fears.

  • Nov 27

    The thing you're most likely to catch is chronic back pain. Don't take chances with it, always use proper m+h techniques.

  • Nov 27

    You are more likely to catch something from a shopping cart.

  • Nov 27

    If you follow proper hand washing and PPE protocols, the likelihood is infinitesimally small. If you are up to date on vaccinations, your likelihood of contracting vaccine-preventable illnesses (including flu) are lowered as well.

  • Nov 27

    OP you really have no idea how medical school works or matching, do you?

    Lol med students/post grad docs have ZERO or very LITTLE choice where they specialize.

    Matching determines all and you're pretty much bound to it.


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