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SoldierNurse22, BSN, RN, EMT-B 52,154 Views

Joined Mar 29, '10. Posts: 2,234 (67% Liked) Likes: 7,017

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  • Jan 10

    Quote from kbrn2002
    Did you notice how even in a thread about superstition the "Q" word hasn't been mentioned? Saying it's slow is bad enough, but heaven help the poor soul that pronounces "it's been a quiet night."

    Aaaaaaagh! You didn't just say that! Delete! Delete! Delete!

  • Jan 10

    Quote from VioletKaliLPN
    I do not care who you are, NEVER tell me it is a slow night. NOPE... You better hush up. I am 34 for reference, so young and not considered "old school". (IMHO)
    Did you notice how even in a thread about superstition the "Q" word hasn't been mentioned? Saying it's slow is bad enough, but heaven help the poor soul that pronounces "it's been a quiet night."

  • Jan 10

    I do not care who you are, NEVER tell me it is a slow night. NOPE... You better hush up. I am 34 for reference, so young and not considered "old school". (IMHO)

  • Jan 10

    And let's not forget the very real and horrendous consequences of ever saying "it's a slow night"..... similar to theater folk talking about that Scottish play.

  • Jan 9

    Quote from lnvitale
    Send her to high school so she can be an adolescent, go to prom, crush on people her own age and do all the rite of passage stuff one needs to do in order to become a young adult, much less a nurse.
    I'd say the OP's daughter has the makings of a great nurse without all of that unnecessary bull poop. She is far ahead of where I was at 14.

  • Jan 9

    Quote from lnvitale
    Send her to high school so she can be an adolescent, go to prom, crush on people her own age and do all the rite of passage stuff one needs to do in order to become a young adult, much less a nurse.
    My homeschooled kids get plenty of interaction with other kids - crushes and all. Public school doesn't have the market cornered on life experiences or rites of passage.

  • Jan 9

    I agree with both. When I was a student I didn't see all the 'cool stuff'.... what I didn't know was that when that nurse was handing out meds they are assessing the patient....are they swallowing ok, reacting appropriately, any changes to cognition, any swelling, are they speaking in full sentences, are they wincing when they move.....
    I didn't notice the nurses assessing skin integrity when they bed bathed, or checking if the body is limp or rigid, noticing a fever....
    I didn't see when they wrote their contemporaneous notes they were checking things off, doing their A-Gs over and over in their head looking for signs of deterioration....and if there are signs what have they done, what is next....
    I remember when I was a new student thinking vital signs were boring! I promise an exsanguinating pt, a septic pt, an airway obstruction, an arrest....vitals are very important, but by the same token, a good nurse can often catch a decline early.

    I remember once when writing my starting progress notes just before meds..... I needed to look at the patient's potassium level.... Not only was it 6.2mmol but the patient had been chartered for KCL PO TDS and given it the past 3 days. The patient also had a cardiac hx and recently started on ACE inhibitors....

    Now student nurses.... ask yourself what my boring charting and meds process did for that patient.....

  • Jan 9

    Wow that is a very sad way to view nursing. You do not see all they are thinking about and doing. And it's interesting to me you want to be a nurse but think you're above getting water for a patient that is relying on you.

  • Jan 9

    Quote from la_chica_suerte85
    Can I downvote this?

    "Fetching" that water is an important opportunity for assessment. For me, it's a good time to catch up on I/Os and it might also clue me in on how a pt who previously was barely tolerating their clrs is now able to consume a normal amount without barfing it back up. It's an opportunity for teaching my DI pts on their water goals if their sodium levels start creeping back up. Any interaction with a pt is a nurse assessing and....AHEM....using the knowledge I have. SMH, indeed.

    That's fine you don't want to be a bedside nurse but whatever you do end up finding yourself doing, please make sure you have the background to know what you are talking about when it pertains to all the things nurses do. It might seem mundane to you but you truly haven't starting thinking like a nurse yet and hopefully you eat your words someday soon.
    I am sure they will. Apparently this person wants to be an NP. LOL. Good luck with that attitude.

  • Jan 9

    Quote from Lightning90
    Yeah i just got done with my first clinical semester and i noticed this to.. Nurses spend a significant amount of time just handing out meds... And documenting... And doing boring ass stuff. However i knew going into nursing school that I didnt want to be a bedside nurse... Youre literally a waiter is how i see it. Ive seen nurses fetching pitchers of water for clients. Smh. For all the knowledge you have...
    Can I downvote this?

    "Fetching" that water is an important opportunity for assessment. For me, it's a good time to catch up on I/Os and it might also clue me in on how a pt who previously was barely tolerating their clrs is now able to consume a normal amount without barfing it back up. It's an opportunity for teaching my DI pts on their water goals if their sodium levels start creeping back up. Any interaction with a pt is a nurse assessing and....AHEM....using the knowledge I have. SMH, indeed.

    That's fine you don't want to be a bedside nurse but whatever you do end up finding yourself doing, please make sure you have the background to know what you are talking about when it pertains to all the things nurses do. It might seem mundane to you but you truly haven't starting thinking like a nurse yet and hopefully you eat your words someday soon.

  • Jan 9

    Quote from Lightning90
    Sometimes i feel like nurses think they are the ****. Like ooo i just got through nursing school, it was the hardest thing EVER (lmao). And than here they are doing things at work that a regular person could do (fetching water, bed baths, cleaning up). And when a problem arises, its not even in your scope to treat it! Lol. Thats why i said youre like a waiter (a messenger). In my eyes nurses do all the boring work that comes along in health care. Oh i forgot to add, the pay is ****.
    Are you in nursing school? If so, do us all a favor and drop out stat. Seriously.

  • Jan 9

    Thank you, I think I just had a lousy first clinical experience. There were two nurses that were phenomenal but the others....I had no clue what a fire this would light or else I probably would have kept my mouth shut...

  • Jan 9

    Thanks to Esme for editing this troll-y thread. I think you might have missed a few teeeeeny bits, LOL.

    {::hugs and smudge::}

    As for Lightning, I just can't wait to see how he or she cuts the first semester of nursing clinicals. Oh my stars and garters, I'd pay good money (of which I earn quite a bit in my specialty, thanks) to see me some of that.

  • Jan 9

    Quote from Lightning90
    . Anyway, i stand by the comments I have made. NURSES think they use their brain alot? Than what do doctors do? LOL. Doctors are the ones truly saving peoples lives..
    Then (notice the correct spelling?) why are you not in medical school? It's nice that you hold such a high esteem for physicians, but as you are in school to become a nurse, it looks like you don't expect to be able to do much as a nurse practitioner, as you say doctors are the ones truly saving people's lives.

    Nurses are just babysitting. Stop acting like nurses analyze every single little thing over every single second of work. Most of the time youre being a waiter, cna or housekeeper
    I dearly hope that when loved ones of yours are in a hospital they are not assigned a waiter or housekeeper to provide nursing care. It won't go well for them I assure you. The fact that you can't see the difference saddens me, and it's also unfortunate for your loved ones. You won't know who is providing good, competent care and who isn't, as you think everyone who is not a physician is all the same to you.

    I wonder what you'd do to know that sometimes, to a physician, you as a nurse practitioner might just as well be a housekeeper? Something tells me you'd be all turned inside out over that, insisting you are better than what they think you are. Doesn't matter really as it's unlikely you'd get to that point anyway, just food for thought.

  • Jan 9

    WOW.

    I feel bad for Lightning. While there is nothing wrong with not wanting to be a bedside nurse, it is absolutely disgusting to look down upon nurses/any member of your healthcare TEAM. This goes for all professions/work settings. Everyone has different backgrounds, and that is why people come together to make it happen. NP's do not run the entire show. Not even CLOSE. You will be quickly humbled by how many people are 100x smarter than you.

    My husband is a PA with 5 years experience and top notch grades, still pretty young. He often speaks highly of the nurses he has worked with in his years who have "saved" him or greatly educated him at work. In his ICU rotation, he always said how thankful he was that he worked with such brilliant nurses who were there to help and educate.

    If Lightning even MAKES IT to NP school (much less through nursing school), I'm sure their colleagues will see right through their crappy attitude and not make their job any easier. When you need the help of a lowly nurse, I'm sure they will take extra care of you. Also, you would very possibly be working with some RN's who make more money than you as a new NP. Hope that doesn't upset you too much. Or when a patient says they don't want to see the nurse (you), they'd rather see the DOCTOR.


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