Content That SoldierNurse22 Likes

Content That SoldierNurse22 Likes

SoldierNurse22, BSN, RN, EMT-B 46,430 Views

Joined Mar 29, '10. Posts: 2,215 (67% Liked) Likes: 6,977

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  • May 3

    Quote from TheCommuter
    Use 'I' statements...

    "I am feeling threatened whenever you resort to name-calling..."
    "I feel a hostile environment is promoted when you refer to nurses as monkeys..."
    "I feel you are behaving in an uncivil manner when you hurl insults. Please stop."
    How about "I think you are a sphincter"?

  • May 3

    Call HR and follow it up by a written complaint. You want it on file for your protection. Such language is unacceptable under any circumstances. Do not reply to him , do not entertain him, do not add a comment. Just walk away and do the above.

  • May 3

    I'd twist around, look confused, and say that I can't be a monkey since I don't have a tail.

    And then I'd tell him to stop being so crass.

  • May 3

    Quote from TheCommuter
    Use 'I' statements...

    "I am feeling threatened whenever you resort to name-calling..."
    "I feel a hostile environment is promoted when you refer to nurses as monkeys..."
    "I feel you are behaving in an uncivil manner when you hurl insults. Please stop."
    Or "You" statements. "You better knock that crap off in a big hurry."

  • May 3

    I would tell this doctor that he needed to provide medications and care to the patient since I am a monkey.

    Annie

  • May 3

    Knowing my twisted/bizarre sense of humor I might just have started jumping around and scratching my pits, making eee eee eee sounds. Yea. That is how I would have handled it, so as to use absurdity to highlight the absurd.

    A younger me would rise up in anger. The older, more calm me would make fun of such a comment and make him look silly by BEING SILLY.

    Don't let stupid things like this get you down.

  • May 3

    Use 'I' statements...

    "I am feeling threatened whenever you resort to name-calling..."
    "I feel a hostile environment is promoted when you refer to nurses as monkeys..."
    "I feel you are behaving in an uncivil manner when you hurl insults. Please stop."

  • May 1

    Quote from nancynance
    Anyone ever see a woman with an epidural deliver in a side lying position? I've often thought it would be possible but have never actually seen it done.
    Did it with Thing 2!

    I got my epidural at 9cm, very long story there, but I pushed/delivered her on my side. We were trying to get her head under my pubic bone, and side-lying did the trick. I can't remember who was holding my leg, if it was my L&D nurse or my husband. But I do remember was that once her head passed under the pubic bone, she practically delivered herself.

  • May 1

    Quote from nancynance
    Anyone ever see a woman with an epidural deliver in a side lying position? I've often thought it would be possible but have never actually seen it done.
    Yes, I do it all the time. You just need some help to hold her legs.

  • May 1

    Quote from OBwonKnewbie
    So interesting, thank you for that information! We give epidurals so much that almost all of our patients delivery on their backs. It's a pet peeve of mine
    Anyone ever see a woman with an epidural deliver in a side lying position? I've often thought it would be possible but have never actually seen it done.

  • Apr 27

    A case study? This reads more like a piece of fantasy fiction.

  • Apr 27

    Reading this from a nursing student's perspective, I gotta say: "c'mon now, honestly?" This is the type of innovative, unrealistic "advice" I have to look forward to in the years to come to apply to my future career?

    Even I can see the BS.

    Luckily, I'm realistic.

    First piece of advice gained: don't read these type of articles.

  • Apr 27

    My jaw dropped when I read that the manager offered to pick up the first 4 hours of a shift. Most managers on most floors that I work will occasionally answer a call light. Occasionally. And then come find me to fix the problem. There was one manager who actually shut off an IV pump and flushed the line after an antibiotic was finished. I've never seen it before or since.

    It all sounds good in print but it is so far from the real world that we live in.

  • Apr 27

    Where do we find the people that write these articles?

    I would be willing to bet most of my bank account they don't work bedside, and probably haven't for years if they ever did at all. I have never had a manager cover any shifts for me, or any part of any shift. This sort of fairytale post is ridiculous.

    In fact, my nurse manager was only a bedside nurse for a couple of years before she became a manager, and she was a nurse when there was still paper charting at my job. She freely admits she has no idea how to do any documentation or administer any medications in the computer. She talked in a staff meeting about how she didn't know how to turn an IV pump off once when she tried to help and the patient in the room looked at her like she was nuts.

    She would be worse than useless trying to help the bedside out, and honestly, she'd probably be dangerous. One time she came in a little early and took the trash out of the rooms for us. I think that's the extent of the help she's qualified to give.

  • Apr 27

    It would be amazing if I could find my boss to have that conversation with, much less get her to come in Sunday to cover part of my shift so I could sleep in. Her weekend starts Friday and ends Monday.


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