Latest Likes For SoldierNurse22

Latest Likes For SoldierNurse22

SoldierNurse22, BSN, RN, EMT-B 48,439 Views

Joined Mar 29, '10. Posts: 2,217 (67% Liked) Likes: 6,994

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  • Jul 22

    As an active duty Army officer and in my experience in both civilian and military medicine, this is absolutely incorrect and total overkill.

    In medicine, the goal is to be forthright while being professional, polite, concise and accurate. Even in the military, this is the case with little exception. There are still pieces of military culture mixed into military medicine to be certain, but no one benefits from having someone jump down their throat in an attempt to "teach" them something important, especially in a field like nursing where being able to ask questions and approach one's preceptor is absolutely paramount.

    No matter what it may feel like, nursing isn't war. Not even close. To draw such tight parallels to training like an infantryman who will eventually have to perform under fire is ridiculous. I work on a ward where the military leadership treat each other and their civilian counterparts like they were training for a literal battle--the backbiting, bickering, and lateral violence is unbelievable and extremely unhealthy for both the staff and the patients who came under our care. I would NEVER condone a "battle mindset" as appropriate conditions for which to teach new nurses, much less to work as an experienced RN. I cannot say enough on this matter--even in the military, lateral violence is not only ineffective as a teaching tool, but it is unacceptable.

    I wish I had time to write more. This very topic is one I've been dealing with for some time, and I have quite an opinion on it. I just don't want anyone to think that abuse and mistreatment--whether that be mental, emotional, physical, etc--are ever acceptable teaching methods in nursing.

    That's why the AMEDD has a markedly different culture from the rest of the Army.

  • Jul 22

    As an active duty Army officer and in my experience in both civilian and military medicine, this is absolutely incorrect and total overkill.

    In medicine, the goal is to be forthright while being professional, polite, concise and accurate. Even in the military, this is the case with little exception. There are still pieces of military culture mixed into military medicine to be certain, but no one benefits from having someone jump down their throat in an attempt to "teach" them something important, especially in a field like nursing where being able to ask questions and approach one's preceptor is absolutely paramount.

    No matter what it may feel like, nursing isn't war. Not even close. To draw such tight parallels to training like an infantryman who will eventually have to perform under fire is ridiculous. I work on a ward where the military leadership treat each other and their civilian counterparts like they were training for a literal battle--the backbiting, bickering, and lateral violence is unbelievable and extremely unhealthy for both the staff and the patients who came under our care. I would NEVER condone a "battle mindset" as appropriate conditions for which to teach new nurses, much less to work as an experienced RN. I cannot say enough on this matter--even in the military, lateral violence is not only ineffective as a teaching tool, but it is unacceptable.

    I wish I had time to write more. This very topic is one I've been dealing with for some time, and I have quite an opinion on it. I just don't want anyone to think that abuse and mistreatment--whether that be mental, emotional, physical, etc--are ever acceptable teaching methods in nursing.

    That's why the AMEDD has a markedly different culture from the rest of the Army.

  • Jul 22

    As an active duty Army officer and in my experience in both civilian and military medicine, this is absolutely incorrect and total overkill.

    In medicine, the goal is to be forthright while being professional, polite, concise and accurate. Even in the military, this is the case with little exception. There are still pieces of military culture mixed into military medicine to be certain, but no one benefits from having someone jump down their throat in an attempt to "teach" them something important, especially in a field like nursing where being able to ask questions and approach one's preceptor is absolutely paramount.

    No matter what it may feel like, nursing isn't war. Not even close. To draw such tight parallels to training like an infantryman who will eventually have to perform under fire is ridiculous. I work on a ward where the military leadership treat each other and their civilian counterparts like they were training for a literal battle--the backbiting, bickering, and lateral violence is unbelievable and extremely unhealthy for both the staff and the patients who came under our care. I would NEVER condone a "battle mindset" as appropriate conditions for which to teach new nurses, much less to work as an experienced RN. I cannot say enough on this matter--even in the military, lateral violence is not only ineffective as a teaching tool, but it is unacceptable.

    I wish I had time to write more. This very topic is one I've been dealing with for some time, and I have quite an opinion on it. I just don't want anyone to think that abuse and mistreatment--whether that be mental, emotional, physical, etc--are ever acceptable teaching methods in nursing.

    That's why the AMEDD has a markedly different culture from the rest of the Army.

  • Jul 17

    My go-to lately for new L&D nurses on this site has been the following blog:

    https://cervixwithasmile.wordpress.c...-job-on-earth/

    That post, specifically. There are other posts with stories and the like, but the one linked above should give you a really good idea of what you're going to encounter in L&D that you may never have thought about. I'm not trying to burst your bubble, but I also would hate for you to enter the field and not be aware of some of the burn-out factors in this particular specialty.

  • Jul 16

    As an active duty Army officer and in my experience in both civilian and military medicine, this is absolutely incorrect and total overkill.

    In medicine, the goal is to be forthright while being professional, polite, concise and accurate. Even in the military, this is the case with little exception. There are still pieces of military culture mixed into military medicine to be certain, but no one benefits from having someone jump down their throat in an attempt to "teach" them something important, especially in a field like nursing where being able to ask questions and approach one's preceptor is absolutely paramount.

    No matter what it may feel like, nursing isn't war. Not even close. To draw such tight parallels to training like an infantryman who will eventually have to perform under fire is ridiculous. I work on a ward where the military leadership treat each other and their civilian counterparts like they were training for a literal battle--the backbiting, bickering, and lateral violence is unbelievable and extremely unhealthy for both the staff and the patients who came under our care. I would NEVER condone a "battle mindset" as appropriate conditions for which to teach new nurses, much less to work as an experienced RN. I cannot say enough on this matter--even in the military, lateral violence is not only ineffective as a teaching tool, but it is unacceptable.

    I wish I had time to write more. This very topic is one I've been dealing with for some time, and I have quite an opinion on it. I just don't want anyone to think that abuse and mistreatment--whether that be mental, emotional, physical, etc--are ever acceptable teaching methods in nursing.

    That's why the AMEDD has a markedly different culture from the rest of the Army.

  • Jul 16

    As an active duty Army officer and in my experience in both civilian and military medicine, this is absolutely incorrect and total overkill.

    In medicine, the goal is to be forthright while being professional, polite, concise and accurate. Even in the military, this is the case with little exception. There are still pieces of military culture mixed into military medicine to be certain, but no one benefits from having someone jump down their throat in an attempt to "teach" them something important, especially in a field like nursing where being able to ask questions and approach one's preceptor is absolutely paramount.

    No matter what it may feel like, nursing isn't war. Not even close. To draw such tight parallels to training like an infantryman who will eventually have to perform under fire is ridiculous. I work on a ward where the military leadership treat each other and their civilian counterparts like they were training for a literal battle--the backbiting, bickering, and lateral violence is unbelievable and extremely unhealthy for both the staff and the patients who came under our care. I would NEVER condone a "battle mindset" as appropriate conditions for which to teach new nurses, much less to work as an experienced RN. I cannot say enough on this matter--even in the military, lateral violence is not only ineffective as a teaching tool, but it is unacceptable.

    I wish I had time to write more. This very topic is one I've been dealing with for some time, and I have quite an opinion on it. I just don't want anyone to think that abuse and mistreatment--whether that be mental, emotional, physical, etc--are ever acceptable teaching methods in nursing.

    That's why the AMEDD has a markedly different culture from the rest of the Army.

  • Jul 16

    As an active duty Army officer and in my experience in both civilian and military medicine, this is absolutely incorrect and total overkill.

    In medicine, the goal is to be forthright while being professional, polite, concise and accurate. Even in the military, this is the case with little exception. There are still pieces of military culture mixed into military medicine to be certain, but no one benefits from having someone jump down their throat in an attempt to "teach" them something important, especially in a field like nursing where being able to ask questions and approach one's preceptor is absolutely paramount.

    No matter what it may feel like, nursing isn't war. Not even close. To draw such tight parallels to training like an infantryman who will eventually have to perform under fire is ridiculous. I work on a ward where the military leadership treat each other and their civilian counterparts like they were training for a literal battle--the backbiting, bickering, and lateral violence is unbelievable and extremely unhealthy for both the staff and the patients who came under our care. I would NEVER condone a "battle mindset" as appropriate conditions for which to teach new nurses, much less to work as an experienced RN. I cannot say enough on this matter--even in the military, lateral violence is not only ineffective as a teaching tool, but it is unacceptable.

    I wish I had time to write more. This very topic is one I've been dealing with for some time, and I have quite an opinion on it. I just don't want anyone to think that abuse and mistreatment--whether that be mental, emotional, physical, etc--are ever acceptable teaching methods in nursing.

    That's why the AMEDD has a markedly different culture from the rest of the Army.

  • Jul 16

    As an active duty Army officer and in my experience in both civilian and military medicine, this is absolutely incorrect and total overkill.

    In medicine, the goal is to be forthright while being professional, polite, concise and accurate. Even in the military, this is the case with little exception. There are still pieces of military culture mixed into military medicine to be certain, but no one benefits from having someone jump down their throat in an attempt to "teach" them something important, especially in a field like nursing where being able to ask questions and approach one's preceptor is absolutely paramount.

    No matter what it may feel like, nursing isn't war. Not even close. To draw such tight parallels to training like an infantryman who will eventually have to perform under fire is ridiculous. I work on a ward where the military leadership treat each other and their civilian counterparts like they were training for a literal battle--the backbiting, bickering, and lateral violence is unbelievable and extremely unhealthy for both the staff and the patients who came under our care. I would NEVER condone a "battle mindset" as appropriate conditions for which to teach new nurses, much less to work as an experienced RN. I cannot say enough on this matter--even in the military, lateral violence is not only ineffective as a teaching tool, but it is unacceptable.

    I wish I had time to write more. This very topic is one I've been dealing with for some time, and I have quite an opinion on it. I just don't want anyone to think that abuse and mistreatment--whether that be mental, emotional, physical, etc--are ever acceptable teaching methods in nursing.

    That's why the AMEDD has a markedly different culture from the rest of the Army.

  • Jul 6

    My go-to lately for new L&D nurses on this site has been the following blog:

    https://cervixwithasmile.wordpress.c...-job-on-earth/

    That post, specifically. There are other posts with stories and the like, but the one linked above should give you a really good idea of what you're going to encounter in L&D that you may never have thought about. I'm not trying to burst your bubble, but I also would hate for you to enter the field and not be aware of some of the burn-out factors in this particular specialty.

  • Jul 6

    Wow. That sucks. I'd be frustrated too, OP.

    Have you ever asked him to help you study? He may gain a new appreciation for what you're doing if he sees what you're up against.

    If he declines because he doesn't think he can help, you've got your point made right there.

  • May 25

    If I had a dime for every family member who thought this, I could retire!

    It's really rather sad, I've always thought, when you get some know-it-all family member with an iPad who thinks their 20 minutes of googling somehow trumps your education, CEUs and experience in your field.

    Oh, an they probably also want your input on their 5 or 6 self-diagnosed (of course) little problems. But God forbid you suggest they might be wise in seeking actual medical counsel for their issues, because the second you head in that direction, then *poof*! And you're just the stupid nurse again.

    **** you, WebMD!!!!!

  • May 22

    If I had a dime for every family member who thought this, I could retire!

    It's really rather sad, I've always thought, when you get some know-it-all family member with an iPad who thinks their 20 minutes of googling somehow trumps your education, CEUs and experience in your field.

    Oh, an they probably also want your input on their 5 or 6 self-diagnosed (of course) little problems. But God forbid you suggest they might be wise in seeking actual medical counsel for their issues, because the second you head in that direction, then *poof*! And you're just the stupid nurse again.

    **** you, WebMD!!!!!

  • May 18

    Nope, nothing I've ever seen, even in cases of severe maternal disease prompting a medically-indicated IOL (if anything, our docs are more aggressive about cervical ripening in those populations so as to increase the likelihood of vaginal birth. I mean, why not do it right from the start--the OR isn't going anywhere!). Our multips have to have a Bishop of 6 just to get an elective IOL, primips have to have a Bishop of 8. Even then, our docs usually use cervical ripening if mom is less that 3cm/50%.

  • May 18

    Nope, nothing I've ever seen, even in cases of severe maternal disease prompting a medically-indicated IOL (if anything, our docs are more aggressive about cervical ripening in those populations so as to increase the likelihood of vaginal birth. I mean, why not do it right from the start--the OR isn't going anywhere!). Our multips have to have a Bishop of 6 just to get an elective IOL, primips have to have a Bishop of 8. Even then, our docs usually use cervical ripening if mom is less that 3cm/50%.

  • May 18

    Holy contaminated field, batman.

    I'm good with "gentle" c/s practice in a non-emergent setting, but this...looks like you're asking for an infection.

    The natural caesarean: a woman-centred technique
    Interesting article, but with very little evidence behind it as this is clearly a new practice. Please note that the above article does not address an increased risk of infection at all.


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