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SoldierNurse22, BSN, RN, EMT-B 55,819 Views

Joined Mar 29, '10. Posts: 2,233 (67% Liked) Likes: 7,046

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  • Aug 13

    If I had a dime for every family member who thought this, I could retire!

    It's really rather sad, I've always thought, when you get some know-it-all family member with an iPad who thinks their 20 minutes of googling somehow trumps your education, CEUs and experience in your field.

    Oh, an they probably also want your input on their 5 or 6 self-diagnosed (of course) little problems. But God forbid you suggest they might be wise in seeking actual medical counsel for their issues, because the second you head in that direction, then *poof*! And you're just the stupid nurse again.

    **** you, WebMD!!!!!

  • Aug 7

    I work in a military facility. I have worked in several. I think we are the exception to the rule.

    I am an Army nurse. I am called Lieutenant Soldiernurse.

    My civilian counterparts are called Mrs. Jones, Ms. Jones, or Mr. Jones. Some of them are still called -*gasp*- Nurse Jones!

    Our docs are called either Dr. Smith or CPT/MAJ/LTC/COL Smith--either by job title or by rank.

    Our patients are addressed with their title and last name.

    Can these formal rules be broken? Yes, but it has to be mutual. For instance, I have had patients who have called me by my first name. I have had patients who asked me to call them by their first name. I have also had doctors who I have known on a first name basis. Is it common? More so with patients than with docs, but yes, it does happen. This might be the little corner of the US where title, rank and formality still applies.

  • Aug 1

    First off, congrats on your great escape back to the world if civilians!

    I am a 66H, a med-surg nurse on AD. I used to work closely with the LPN students at Walter Reed-Bethesda when they cycled through our ward, and I learned a lot from them about life as an enlistee in an Army school.

    The VA system as well as the GS system hires LPNs. I worked with both agency/contract and GS LPNs back at Walter Reed on my oncology floor, but as PFMB-RN said, you have to be willing to go where the job is, be it a GS or VA job.

    Keep in mind that school on the outside is nothing like Army AIT. You are actually given a chance to sleep, see your friends/family and maintain your own life. You might hear your fellow students whining about professors "monopolizing" their time, but it is nothing like have a DS or Army school instructor standing over you 24/7. I think you'll find it's a lot easier than what you experienced while you were in the service, especially if you are self-motivated and driven to accomplish your goals.

    For the record, I agree: go get your BSN! Best of luck to you!

  • Jul 31

    Nicely done, gypsyd8. A cogently written article from an intelligent participant/observer, of which there are sadly and decidedly few.

  • Jul 28

    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    I know that feeling.......by then, that's when my back teeth are floating and my eyes turn yellow!
    Exactly! Then there's that awkward moment where, after you've been begging someone to watch your patients so you can pee, and someone finally agrees, you're like ...no, I'm good. Don't have to go anymore. Standby for 30 minutes?

  • Jul 12

    Though this is a pretty good explanation of what nursing has become and (I can only assume) meant to be tongue in cheek, I disagree with the fundamental assumption behind the philosophy that nursing still finds its helpless place under the dictatorship of a physician.

    I am a nurse. I have my own license. I have an education that allows me to make intelligent, informed decisions in the care of my patients. I round with physicians whenever I can so that nursing concerns are voiced in the medical picture of the patient. I protect/help/serve the patients. I work alongside and next to the physicians, not below or behind them. If by some chance my duties to the patient include preventing a physician from ordering/implementing/completing a treatment that would harm my patient and thereby protect/help/serve the physician in the process, so be it. But make no mistake; I act on behalf of the patient, not the physician.

  • Jun 29

    Quote from maxthecat
    I understand what you're saying, but sometimes families DO know better than the nurse. As a nurse, I have learned a lot from a few families over the years, especially when dealing with someone who has one of the less common maladies. I don't have the time or energy to keep up with every advance in medicine, but some family members have researched their loved one's condition impeccably. They also know what has worked and what has not worked in the past. Of course they're not usually professional researchers and of course their suggestions need to be run past the medical team first. But don't count them out--you might learn something.
    That is not the scenario laid out in the cartoon. You're describing a family member who is intimately involved in the patient's care and knowledgeable from what is often years of caregiving. Not someone who just googled a bunch of symptoms and slapped on a diagnosis based on what the all-knowing Google spit out.

  • Jun 29

    If I had a dime for every family member who thought this, I could retire!

    It's really rather sad, I've always thought, when you get some know-it-all family member with an iPad who thinks their 20 minutes of googling somehow trumps your education, CEUs and experience in your field.

    Oh, an they probably also want your input on their 5 or 6 self-diagnosed (of course) little problems. But God forbid you suggest they might be wise in seeking actual medical counsel for their issues, because the second you head in that direction, then *poof*! And you're just the stupid nurse again.

    **** you, WebMD!!!!!

  • Jun 28

    If I had a dime for every family member who thought this, I could retire!

    It's really rather sad, I've always thought, when you get some know-it-all family member with an iPad who thinks their 20 minutes of googling somehow trumps your education, CEUs and experience in your field.

    Oh, an they probably also want your input on their 5 or 6 self-diagnosed (of course) little problems. But God forbid you suggest they might be wise in seeking actual medical counsel for their issues, because the second you head in that direction, then *poof*! And you're just the stupid nurse again.

    **** you, WebMD!!!!!

  • Jun 24

    Quote from maxthecat
    I understand what you're saying, but sometimes families DO know better than the nurse. As a nurse, I have learned a lot from a few families over the years, especially when dealing with someone who has one of the less common maladies. I don't have the time or energy to keep up with every advance in medicine, but some family members have researched their loved one's condition impeccably. They also know what has worked and what has not worked in the past. Of course they're not usually professional researchers and of course their suggestions need to be run past the medical team first. But don't count them out--you might learn something.
    That is not the scenario laid out in the cartoon. You're describing a family member who is intimately involved in the patient's care and knowledgeable from what is often years of caregiving. Not someone who just googled a bunch of symptoms and slapped on a diagnosis based on what the all-knowing Google spit out.

  • Jun 23

    You're dating someone who thinks your profession and your work is inferior? No wonder you have an inferiority complex, in addition to your own opinion of yourself and your future career ("I am but a lowly student murse").

    What's your beef with your chosen profession? You make a point of talking about being a male nurse as if there's more expected of you because you're a guy. Is it really your girlfriend who looks down on you, or are you projecting your own insecurities?

    I also dated a doc back in my single days. He had nothing but respect for my profession and the intelligent men and women who work with him in the trenches on a daily basis. I never heard a disparaging word--nothing about how I wasn't smart enough to get into med school (I never wanted to be a doc, thanks) or how nursing was a fallback for the less intelligent. You're a student nurse. You know how competitive it is to get into nursing right now. It is not for the weak willed or the weak minded.

    Nursing and medicine must work hand in hand (no pun intended). Any other combination is detrimental to the patient. Smart nurses and physicians know this, embrace the differences in practice and agree to work together.

  • Jun 1

    How long does your classmate really think he can get by fooling his nursing instructors and clinical preceptors into thinking he's a flight paramedic if he actually isn't? Do you realize how fast this guy's going to sink?

    OP, he's made his own noose, found his own millstone and has thrown that millstone into the sea. No need to strangle him. He's going to drown anyway.

  • Apr 24

    Ashbe,

    You are not alone.

    Please re-read that first sentence as much as you need to before continuing.

    You are a new nurse. It is normal to feel overwhelmed as a new nurse on a general med-surg floor. Specialties are a whole different can of worms! I was a new grad in oncology once, too, and I kid you not, I felt like I knew nothing for about the first year. The difference is--I expected that. I accepted it. I decided, OK, I know very little. So I made good friends with the experienced nurses on my ward. I talked to the docs, to my patients, and to anyone who would give me the time of day.

    Your knowledge of nursing in general grows exponentially your first year working on your own. You have the unique challenge of trying to hone your basic nursing skills as well as your specialized oncology skills. The best advice I can give you is to hone your basic nursing skills first. Listen to your gut. If you're worried, ask an experienced nurse. Ask your charge nurse. The nice thing about floor nursing is you're never alone! If you feel that you are, you're probably working in a toxic environment that isn't safe for your license. That's an issue all its own!

    Oncology can be, by its very nature, a depressing field. My unit also struggled with depression, especially when patient deaths were frequent and the winter months dragged on. Do you have hobbies? Do you have friends or family that you hang out with after work? Do not lose your social life and that integral part of "you" to "nurse you". Learn early that your professional life and your personal life need to be separate. That doesn't mean that you can't have friends on your ward if you so choose, but you need to go home and think about something other than work after hours/on days off.

    Please visit this section of AN: Oncology Nursing This is where the oncology nurses hang out. There are a lot of great people who have had conversations very much like the one you've started here.

    Specifically, this thread strongly resembles your post: http://allnurses.com/oncology-nursin...rn-819346.html Again, there is great advice in this thread. Please read it over and if you feel you are truly that depressed, take up your unit on the therapy! There is no shame in admitting that you need a helping hand to pull you out of the blues.

    In summation:
    1. Accept the fact that you're new and you don't know everything. Anticipate that this will be the case for about a year.
    2. Plan out how you will handle situations where you don't know something. Have coworkers and colleagues that you can go to for support. Practice saying "I don't know, but I'll find out and tell you in ____ minutes/hours/etc". That phrase works on docs, patients, and other nurses, too.
    3. Analyze your personal life. Are you getting enough sleep? Are you eating well? Are you exercising? Are you maintaining social relationships and friendships? Any one of these areas can contribute to the strain inherent in working oncology. If you need help, talk to a therapist or your PCM if you're not sure you can fix them on your own.

    Chin up, OP! Please feel free to PM me if you'd like.

  • Apr 8

    Quote from Jenni811
    And I KNOW her life experience. She had me very young so in the 24 years I've been alive not much more had happened than when she was my age.
    You know some of what your mother has experienced, but you really can't know what someone else has experienced in their life unless you've lived it yourself. Especially considering you were a child and children have a very limited ability to understand adult concepts.

    Even if you were to dismiss the above and claim to be almost impossibly mature for your age when you were a kid, some people --the quietest, most unassuming of us all-- have experienced more life in the calm-appearing length of their existence than folks who have the craziest stories.

    It isn't always the person who has written the tell-all book that has the most intense stories to tell. Often, it's the opposite.

  • Apr 8

    Quote from Jenni811
    But you don't make the decisions. New grads will go with any change. That's what hospitals want...its a business! Its the way it goes.
    If new grads will really go for ANY change, then this profession is in more trouble than I thought.

    Really? You're going to lecture experienced RNs on "how hospitals work" and the ins and outs of business? You deserve the storm that's coming to you.


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