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monkeybug 8,847 Views

Joined Feb 26, '10. Posts: 726 (60% Liked) Likes: 1,624

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  • Sep 18

    Quote from GrnTea
    I had a colleague in the 70s who had had many lost pregnancies, and the only tocolytic they had was IV alcohol. So they put her to bed at about 5 1/2 months on a drip, and she brought it to near-term and had her baby, finally.... but as it grew up it had what we later learned to call fetal alcohol syndrome. Not fun at all.
    That is horrible.

  • Sep 18

    Quote from tnbutterfly
    Speaking of the harrowing 2-day ordeal of State Boards...... One of my classmates was so worked up about taking the boards that she fainted and missed part of the first day's testing. In fact, I don't know what became of her....whether or not she was even allowed in the testing room at all. I try to block out all memories of those 2 days.......except for the miraculous fact that I passed!!!!
    I went into a 3 year fugue state and went to law school (okay, not a fugue, just bad judgment). The Bar exam is still a 2.5 days of torture, with all the law students in one large room in the state capitol. At one point during the day, I got up to get a drink of water and just rest for a second, and I noticed that one of my classmates who had been sitting 5 feet from was missing. Turns out that he had passed out and an ambulance had come and carried him out on a stretcher. Five feet from me. And I didn't notice because I was so focused on the exam. Oh well, passed it, didn't get a job, and went back to the hospital, but it does give me some interesting stories.

  • Sep 16

    In nursing school, we were lucky enough to have our own home health patients, we would go out in pairs to see them. One of our patients was a retired nurse in her 80s, and this was in the mid 1990s. We would always spend a long time with her, just talking. She had great stories! Like how they would prepare baby formula, setting milk aside and letting the cream rise to the top. She got in trouble with her DON because she purchased 3 new uniforms when she was hired. Her supervisor came to her and told her they were too short, so she let the hems out. They then told her that it wasn't enough, that she should put false hems on them. Everyone was very scandalized that her ankles were showing!


    It really amuses me, because we had a bit of an upheaval in our unit because some of the younger girls were coming to work wearing skin-tight babydoll T shirts instead of scrub tops, and several of them also usually had a thong visible above their scrub pants. They were counseled over these issues, and none of us got to wear t shirts ever again (we had cute unit t shirts, most of us wore them loosely fitting). Wow, how things have changed.

  • Sep 16

    Quote from amoLucia
    Just thought of the old metal plate addressographs that we used to stamp chart records, charge slips etc. I remember once being so annoyed that I was having to stamp a new, late-admission chart. I was just slamming that thing absent-mindedly when I slammed my thumb under the top press. Boy, did I see stars --- no fractures but I did break the skin. Got my first tetanus shot that shift.
    I remember that thing! You could really vent some frustration with it. Ka WHAM! Ka WHAM!

  • Sep 16

    Quote from GrnTea
    I had a colleague in the 70s who had had many lost pregnancies, and the only tocolytic they had was IV alcohol. So they put her to bed at about 5 1/2 months on a drip, and she brought it to near-term and had her baby, finally.... but as it grew up it had what we later learned to call fetal alcohol syndrome. Not fun at all.
    That is horrible.

  • Sep 16

    In nursing school we had to wear white uniforms, and because the dresses were much cheaper than the pants and tunic option, I got to wear dresses. Knee length, and straight, they were totally impractical. It was almost impossible to get things off the floor without appearing lewd. It did look rather professional, though, I have to admit, with the white hose and proper white shoes. One memorable day, an elderly "gentleman" exposed himself to me and then cackled about it. I was rather flustered and upset. An hour or so later, I bent over to pick up his CPM for his knee replacement. The bell of my stethoscope caught the hem of my dress and WHOOPS! I bared everything from the waist down. He got a nice view of proper nude colored panties encased in white hose. My instructor just looked at me and said, "Guess you got him back for exposing himself."

    I have worn dresses at other times in my career. I had a cute A-line jumper that came to mid shin. Very comfortable, and very modest. It was long enough and full enough that I could do anything I needed to do without baring anything. I hated it when it finally was too worn to wear, and I've never been able to find another one. I have seen a nice maxi scrub skirt in the Uniform Advantage catalog that I'm seriously considering. Now that I'm doing public health, I don't have to worry about crawling under beds to retrieve Foley bags and climbing up on top of beds to move patients.

  • Sep 16

    Quote from tnbutterfly
    Speaking of the harrowing 2-day ordeal of State Boards...... One of my classmates was so worked up about taking the boards that she fainted and missed part of the first day's testing. In fact, I don't know what became of her....whether or not she was even allowed in the testing room at all. I try to block out all memories of those 2 days.......except for the miraculous fact that I passed!!!!
    I went into a 3 year fugue state and went to law school (okay, not a fugue, just bad judgment). The Bar exam is still a 2.5 days of torture, with all the law students in one large room in the state capitol. At one point during the day, I got up to get a drink of water and just rest for a second, and I noticed that one of my classmates who had been sitting 5 feet from was missing. Turns out that he had passed out and an ambulance had come and carried him out on a stretcher. Five feet from me. And I didn't notice because I was so focused on the exam. Oh well, passed it, didn't get a job, and went back to the hospital, but it does give me some interesting stories.

  • Sep 16

    Quote from Pepper The Cat
    It certainly is! I had someone come to me and say that she was getting a low pulse reading and she tried 3 machines and each one gave her a different reading with a range from 30 - 60 BPM.
    So I asked her what is was manually. she looked at me like I had 3 heads and said "Oh, I didn't think to do it that way". I checked, and the pt had a very irregular heart rate which probably caused the problems.
    We had a patient hemorrhaging after a cesarean, and we couldn't get a BP on her! The equipment in our recovery room would not register one, and no manual cuffs were to be found. It was very frustrating for us, and we finally borrowed one from a med surg unit. By that time, her BP was down in the scary area of just being palpable, and only one number. I think every unit should have a manual cuff for these occasions. Now I carry one in my new job, and that's the only kind I use.

  • Aug 24

    I've had it since I graduated. Why? Because I knew that when the proverbial crap hit the fan that my employer would be looking out for their interests, not mine. I'm the only one who really cares, at the end of the day, about me. It's a very little bit to pay for a whole lot of peace of mind. I've never needed it (thank you, Lord) and hope I never do, but it sure is nice to know it's there.

  • Aug 19

    I got very frustrated with nursing and went to law school. I did pass the Bar (first try, go me), but I couldn't find a job. The job market for new lawyers is even worse than the market for nurses. I could have opened my own office, but I watched classmates do that and realized that it wasn't for me. I was making more as a nurse than my classmates that went into their own practices. I'm so far out of law school now that I doubt I could ever get a job as a lawyer. I have a job in public health, though, so I'm extremely happy where I'm at in nursing, now, and have no desire to be anywhere else.

  • Jun 22

    Quote from classicdame
    we were told once to not call into the patient's room if their favorite show was on. Really?
    And how are you to know that? Is their favorite show part of the admission assessment?

  • Jun 13

    Quote from Chrishi
    The only complaint I know of was from a family member. I was in the middle of a long treatment on another patient. This lady wanted me to come listen to her husband's cough, despite the fact that I hadn't heard a cough for the first 7 hours of my shift. It took me probably 20 to 30 minutes to finish the treatment that I'd been doing, then I came to listen. No cough. I stood in his room for fifteen minutes (that I didn't have) just to hear his 'cough'. His lungs were clear on auscultation.

    The next day she complained to the administrator that she had to wait for 2 hours for the nurse to come listen to her husband and then the nurse 'didn't even do anything.'

    I think she wanted me to get an order for cough syrup or an antibiotic that he didn't need. Or maybe she just wanted me to act all excited. I don't know. Needless to say, I didn't get in trouble. But it's annoying when you're doing everything you can to help people & families have these unrealistic expectations of you.
    You're probably right about them wanting you to act excited. It makes families really angry sometimes when we don't respond in the way that they think we should. Like the pregnant patient that comes to L&D triage with no complaints of pain, leaking, or bleeding. Their only "complaint" is that they lost their mucus plug. I respond very calmly, and assure them that it's ok. Upon exam, I discover that her cervix is maybe 0.5 cm (if the examiner is generous), no contractions, and the baby looks beautiful on the monitor. Pt's mother has a come-apart. "But she lost her mucus plug!!!!" Omg, rawr, rawr, rawr, call the rapid response team! It didn't get any better when I calmly told her that I didn't have any to replace it with. Yeah, I should have held back, but come on! You can lose a mucus plug 2 weeks, 2 days, or 2 hours before labor starts, so big freaking deal. And NO! I do not want to see it (if I had a nickel for every time someone fished their mucus plug out of the toilet and brought it in a paper towel, ziplock bag, or baby food jar I wouldn't have to work. I'm happy to mitigate ignorance and educate, and I did attempt it in this situation, but the patient's mother wasn't accepting any knowledge. Her mucus plug came out, and therefore the nurse must....what? I never figured out what she wanted from me. I guess I was supposed to run around in circles in the room, throwing my hands in the air, screaming, "Lawd Jeebus, help us! She's done lost her mucus plug!" Maybe if I'd done that she would have taken it down a notch. The mother was very resistant to discharge, and I had to have the OB come in and speak to them. Said OB had been up for hours doing deliveries and had finally gotten a chance to lay down, so he was none too pleased and it showed. I'm sure she told everyone she came into contact with in the community that her daughter lost her mucus plug and we did nothing and didn't even care!

  • May 9

    Quote from salvadordolly
    Off three days for IV Abx for a kidney infection. Too many back to back UTI's, you know the story.
    DON: I sure hope you have your Dr's excuse.
    ME: Yes, here it is.
    DON: (looks at it) Kidney infection? Goodness sakes! Are you wiping properly??

    Another classic. I got fired from my case management job on a Friday afternoon. At the end of the termination speech, "you are on-call this weekend, you know".

    Are you kidding me? My response would have been, "I DARE you to call me." And as for the kidney infections, how inappropriate!

  • Apr 25

    Quote from nrsang97
    Seriously that is dumb. Management has lost all common sense. I am so lucky I have the manager I have.
    My first manager RUINED me. She was as good as it gets, and she spoiled me. I expected all other managers to be as good as her. We were at a tiny rural hospital. As long as we did our jobs and the patients got good care, she didn't sweat the small stuff. You and your husband both working night shift and you didn't have anyone to keep your kid? She'd let you put them in an empty room overnight, as long as it didn't happen often. I also saw her come in at 2 am in a nightgown, scrub a c section because we were busting at the seams, and then go back home to bed and make it back at 8 am to help out again.

  • Apr 25

    Quote from Testa Rosa, RN
    Awe Monkeybug--so sad to hear about the reduced milk supply because you were unable to pump. I used Fenugreek myself when I started back at work to keep my supply up and then we shifted to night nursing which you know meant I was dead tired at work the next day. Sounds like you are a great Mamma and Nurse. Nurse Managers are LOCO
    I tried Fenugreek without much results, then Reglan, and it made me want to crawl the walls. Very unpleasant drug! I did research and ended up ordering Motillium from a Canadian pharmacy. I had so much trouble with latch, nipple confusion, and supply that once I got good at it I didn't want to stop! I -let him self-wean. Every day I would think we were done, and then he'd drag the Boppy over and sign "milk" so it would continue. I actually did miss it when he got too busy and distracted to nurse. Thanks for the compliments. I tried for so long to have a baby, I want to do everything right and get the most joy out of parenthood that I can. I think I'm doing ok. He's 3 and reads on a kindergarten/first grade level, and he's chock full of personality. Last night I told him I saw him throw a toy at the cat, and he better not do it again. He said, "well stop looking at me and finish cooking supper!"


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