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wooh 33,968 Views

Joined Feb 12, '04 - from 'GA, US'. wooh is a RN & Critter Mama. Posts: 4,987 (74% Liked) Likes: 20,757

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  • Oct 20

    Quote from Nursingluv101
    I will be honest sometimes I don't take break not because my hospital is depriving me of a break but just because I'm behind, and would like to catch up.
    If the workload is so big that you have to skip breaks to catch up, the hospital IS depriving you of a break.

  • Oct 20

    The problem is if you're on a unit that doesn't normally get breaks, management will blame YOU and your time management for not getting one.
    Luckily I'm now on a unit that we normally do get breaks. Now I may not get my lunch until 9 hours into the shift, but I absolutely WILL take a lunch.

    I've also learned that just taking a few minutes to clear your head and regroup actually SAVES time. Sometimes when you think there's no way you have time to stop for at least a break to drink some water (or a caffeinated beverage of your choosing) that's when you most need to just do it.

  • Oct 15

    Hardest nursing? Whatever I'm doing.
    Easiest nursing? Whatever someone else is doing.

  • Oct 2

    Quote from Fiona59
    I don't come to their job sites and hang around to make sure they do their job well. Just give me space and safety to do mine.
    Yeah, but we don't know HOW to do their jobs. EVERYONE knows how to do the nurse's job!

  • Oct 1

    Quote from RNsRWe
    Same reason as every other person who has ever passed on this ridiculous story. One of those things people who study human behavior have worked on for years!
    We get it. You're the smartest one on the thread. If people are going to persist believing it, and your first five posts didn't stop them, do you really think 5 more will?

  • Sep 19

    Everyone thinks that their situation is different. "Well of course *I* don't abuse my spouse. *I* know all the drugs my mother is on." It's not personal. It's like standard precautions.

    You can tell me all you want that YOU don't have HIV or Hep C. I'm still wearing the gloves because there's absolutely no way to tell the difference looking at you whether you have HIV/HepC or don't. It's not personal, it's standard.

    You can tell me all you want that YOU aren't someone that needs to be kicked out of the room. But the person that's throwing dad down the stairs? That's kicking their pregnant wife in the stomach? That doesn't know their husband is taking Viagra? THEY are saying the same thing. There's absolutely no way to tell the difference looking at you.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from Fiona59
    I don't come to their job sites and hang around to make sure they do their job well. Just give me space and safety to do mine.
    Yeah, but we don't know HOW to do their jobs. EVERYONE knows how to do the nurse's job!

  • Sep 13

    Everyone thinks that their situation is different. "Well of course *I* don't abuse my spouse. *I* know all the drugs my mother is on." It's not personal. It's like standard precautions.

    You can tell me all you want that YOU don't have HIV or Hep C. I'm still wearing the gloves because there's absolutely no way to tell the difference looking at you whether you have HIV/HepC or don't. It's not personal, it's standard.

    You can tell me all you want that YOU aren't someone that needs to be kicked out of the room. But the person that's throwing dad down the stairs? That's kicking their pregnant wife in the stomach? That doesn't know their husband is taking Viagra? THEY are saying the same thing. There's absolutely no way to tell the difference looking at you.

  • Sep 13

    Quote from Fiona59
    I don't come to their job sites and hang around to make sure they do their job well. Just give me space and safety to do mine.
    Yeah, but we don't know HOW to do their jobs. EVERYONE knows how to do the nurse's job!

  • Sep 8

    Quote from anotherone
    I do not like asking the patient if the family can stay, becasue i do not know the dynamics of the relationship and the pt may feel pressured into saying yes when he/she really wants to say no.
    Really, in what imaginable family dynamic is a person actually going to be able to comfortably answer, "Can your spouse stay?" IN FRONT OF THE SPOUSE, with, "No, I want my spouse to leave so I can tell you things I don't want him/her to hear."????

  • Sep 8

    Everyone thinks that their situation is different. "Well of course *I* don't abuse my spouse. *I* know all the drugs my mother is on." It's not personal. It's like standard precautions.

    You can tell me all you want that YOU don't have HIV or Hep C. I'm still wearing the gloves because there's absolutely no way to tell the difference looking at you whether you have HIV/HepC or don't. It's not personal, it's standard.

    You can tell me all you want that YOU aren't someone that needs to be kicked out of the room. But the person that's throwing dad down the stairs? That's kicking their pregnant wife in the stomach? That doesn't know their husband is taking Viagra? THEY are saying the same thing. There's absolutely no way to tell the difference looking at you.

  • Sep 8

    Quote from Fiona59
    I don't come to their job sites and hang around to make sure they do their job well. Just give me space and safety to do mine.
    Yeah, but we don't know HOW to do their jobs. EVERYONE knows how to do the nurse's job!

  • Sep 8

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    I think plenty of married couples or those couples who live together or are intimate might still have trouble letting their loved one see them nude, helpless, or with dressings, drains, and the like.
    I was just thinking, my husband gets very irritated if I accidently open the bathroom door when he's on the toilet or in front of it peeing. I generally don't care about that, but I don't want him in the bathroom if I'm doing some "intimate" care on myself.

    Even married people need SOME privacy.

  • Sep 5

    This is now my new favorite thread.

    Quote from hiddencatRN
    We have a place to chart narratives everywhere I've worked. "Patient updated on plan of care, given meal tray, ate pills off floor at own insistence. Family at bedside."
    My note would then continue: "Educated patient that she should not continue to eat pills off of the floor. Informed patient that nursing staff would not purposefully administer oral meds via the floor. Patient voiced understanding. Educated patient to not lick doorknobs. Informed her of the risk of mouth MRSA. Patient also educated not to lick faucets, toilets or friends' oozing pustules. Continued to educate patient on the risks of mouth MRSA. Informed patient that after touching friends' oozing pustules that she should wash her hands prior to putting fingers in mouth. Informed patient regarding hospital policy to deliver meals on trays rather than on floor. Patient will likely need further education regarding risk of mouth MRSA. At this time, patient does not appear to be open to education on mouth MSSA. Hospital system approved "Things to not lick while you're in the hospital!" handout provided to patient with relevant passages highlighted. Patient voices ability to read. Encouraged patient to request assistance as needed for avoiding inadvertent tongue to doorknob, toilet, floor, faucet contact."

    (For the record, I'm completely undecided if I would chart patient insisting on taking pills that fell on the floor or not. Probably would depend on my mood that day.)

  • Sep 4

    Quote from brillohead
    You know you're a nurse when you put a straw in your fast food drink, then look down and realize that you did that "leave the end of the straw wrapper on the tip of the straw" thing to your own drink!
    I hate when I go to restaurants that have PLASTIC straw wrappers! How do they expect me to get it off?


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