Content That BittyBabyGrower Likes

Content That BittyBabyGrower Likes

BittyBabyGrower 8,076 Views

Joined Feb 9, '04 - from 'Somewhere in the midwest'. BittyBabyGrower is a Nurse of course!. He has '30+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'NICU, PICU, educator'. Posts: 1,833 (19% Liked) Likes: 1,041

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  • Aug 22

    If you can't go right to NICU, then mother-baby is a good choice. Mother-baby will be much more useful that med surg.

  • Aug 22

    I came from L&D and postpartum and was basically a 'shoe-in' for NICU. I would say mother-baby would be SO much better than med-surg if you're looking to get into NICU. Also, if your hospital is small and mother-baby nurses cover the nursery, check to see what level nursery. Some hospitals that don't have NICU's will have a nursery that is technically a level II NICU and you might get some experience with some level II kids with respiratory interventions or antibiotics. That means you will also get some NICU experience. Although not full level III or IV, which I am assuming you're after, it is NICU experience none the less.

  • Aug 22

    If you want to move into NICU, Mother/Baby would be a far better unit to get experience in for the reasons stated in previous post.

  • Aug 22

    Quote from GeneralistRN
    Requiring specialized work experience in a given field really undermines the whole point of getting an education. This sort of thing doesn't happen outside of nursing. Not even doctors have to have work experience before they go to medical school or apply for residency: because unlike nursing, medical education provides that necessary experience..
    Not applicable to the NNP discussion. You can't become a Neonatology Fellow until you complete a Pediatric residency. So yes, doctors need work experience within peds/neonatalogy before they can enter "neonatology school."

  • Aug 21

    What exactly do you feel your preceptor did that was outside the scope of her practice?

  • Aug 20

    I work in LTC and when I have a resident tell me they love me, I will tell them I love them back. Staff in these facilities are like family to the elderly and you do form bonds with them. Think of this kind of love as brotherly love which is different than the type of love we feel for family and close friends.

  • Aug 12

    We have access to micromedex and Lexi-comp through our mar. Also, when in doubt I'll speak with a pharmacist- we have one on my unit during the day and I can always reach one on the phone with no problems.

  • Aug 12

    Our hospital uses lexicomp...but it's a database you have to pay for.

  • Aug 7

    You can give phytonadione IV, but it's usually after you give the initial IM injection & want to give the kid another dose due to a bleeding issue. I wouldn't give it IV from the get-go routinely because you don't know how the kid is going to react on an IV form, which can cause an anaphylactic response.

  • Aug 7

    I'm torn--I have watched nurses rush to put patients on oxygen because the pulse oximeter was showing a sat of 75%; meanwhile, the patient is calmly doing a crossword puzzle or, if the patient is 2, jumping up and down in his crib. Or starting chest compressions on a baby because the monitor was reading (incorrectly) a heart rate of 54--baby was conscious and pink, but the nurse felt it necessary to start CPR because the monitor reading dictated it was necessary. These sound like stupid mistakes, and they are. But they are exactly what happens when you fail to filter what the monitor is telling you through the evidence of your own eyes.

    Yes, treat the patient, not the monitor--I know of a little boy who died because his vent tubing came off his trach, adhered with wet suction to his bare chest, and, because the vent was alarming high pressure (potentially serious, but generally allows some leeway in response time) rather than low pressure (requires immediate, top-speed response) the extra 30 seconds in response time cost the child his life.

  • Aug 6

    It depends. I've had orders for 1OFr catheter for a size 4 cuff less trach, 8Fr For cuffed size 4. 10-12Fr for a size 7 cuffed. The manufacturers have recommendations for minimum & maximum suction catheter diameter as well as maximum suction depth. Often printed right on the package insert for the trach

  • Aug 6

    What level NICU is this? If you're bored after 5 months on your own (as a new grad?) in an acute level 3 or big level 4 NICU, I'd be concerned that the problem is that you just don't know what you don't know yet.

  • Aug 6

    It's time to start thinking in terms of "enriching" your job experience as opposed to just going back to school to provide stimulation for growth. Are you ready to precept? Be in charge? Serve on a committee/task force that is working to solve a problem or improve practice in your unit?

    As a student, there was always someone in a "teacher" role stimulating you with assignments and course requirements that forced you to learn new things and develop new skills. Now you need to be a "grown up" and take responsibility for your own learning and growth. You sound ready to do that.

    So instead of looking for someone else to provide that stimulation, do a self-assessment and make a plan to progress in your career as a NICU nurse. Let your unit leaders know that you are interested in "what comes next" in the development of a successful staff nurse. Seek out learning experiences that will establish yourself as an "up and coming" nursing leader. Get involved in the unit's governance structure ... or educational activities ... or Quality Improvement initiatives ... etc. Those types of activities will help you to grow as a professional so that you will be ready for grad school when that time comes.

  • Aug 4

    Quote from NurseGirl525
    Administering pain medication within the appropriate parameters does not turn someone into an instant addict. They are not with us long enough. It's the repeated 30 day scripts that get them addicted.
    You'd be surprised. Some people are more susceptible than others.

  • Aug 4

    93-96% is not a bad sats, however with a rr of 50-60, ineffective suction, moderate recessions and head bob = the child is working pretty hard
    i'll let the team know while trying low flow nc or neblizing hypertonic saline + resuction....but in my limited experience (5months in general paeds with heaps of bron), quite often these type of patients would eventually require HF oxygen...


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