Content That BittyBabyGrower Likes

Content That BittyBabyGrower Likes

BittyBabyGrower 6,905 Views

Joined Feb 9, '04 - from 'Somewhere in the midwest'. BittyBabyGrower is a Nurse of course!. He has '30+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'NICU, PICU, educator'. Posts: 1,754 (17% Liked) Likes: 886

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  • May 24

    One thing to consider with clinics and some procedural areas... You don't necessarily clock out and leave at 5pm. These areas can run late some days, and the nurses leave after the last case is done or the last patient seen.
    A parent needs childcare, back up childcare and emergency backup childcare. And the childcare needs to have some flexibility for the days when things run late.
    You can apply for day positions, but most available shifts will be nights or rotating shifts.

  • May 20

    That's a very nice medical urban legend.

  • May 20

    You better make sure you know what you are signing up for if you go into the service.

    Military world is a whole other creature than civilian world.

  • May 18

    Unfortunately according to CMS guidelines, even if the patient is lowered, it's considered a dall

  • May 18

    In all of my years of nursing I have never allowed myself to be held responsible for something that happens AFTER report/narc count.

  • May 18

    1. You need to document that there were no chair alarms and how you tried to get one several times either in pt record or the incident report.
    2. My experience with using bed alarms on truly a/o pts is they quickly learn to disable them, thus making them not only useless but perhaps more dangerous.
    3. Disagree with pp saying to keep her in bed if no alarm. In my experience anyone near a/o who needs to have "multiple bms" will try to get out of the bed as much if not more than the chair. Also you have orders and mobility is important in healing.
    4. Agree with pp who state that since a nurse WAS IN THE ROOM that a chair alarm would have done you no good in this case.

    Basically, as others have said, you are being thrown under the bus. I encourage you to find a way to ask management what you should have done to prevent this after giving them full explanation of how you tried to obtain an alarm. And maybe once this blows over, ask them to buy more alarms if they are going to insist on them. I don't see how you could have prevented this...except maybe as someone else said put the pt back in bed before report- but that depends on where she was trying to go when she got up from the chair. If it was the commode you still probably would have had the same outcome.

  • May 18

    A patient lowered to the ground by a nurse is not counted as a fall.

  • May 18

    Quote from Guy in Babyland
    Get your BSN. If your school offers an externship/Capstone placement, try to get placed in a NICU (higher the level, the better). If you are able to relocate after graduation, apply to NICU positions at the larger NICUs (children's hospitals). Many of the larger NICUs have established training programs (including classroom time) to train new grads and experienced nurses without NICU experience. Otherwise, take any nursing job you can get, to gain experience and apply to NICUs as positions become available.

    I graduated with my BSN in Aug. 2014, passed NCLEX in Sept, applied to 50-100 openings (mostly NICU positions) in 12 states, had two interviews in Nov. (a Level III in NC and a Level IV in KY). I accepted the job in KY 4 days later and started in Jan. 2015. Many of our new hires are new grads, so it is possible to get a NICU job as a new grad. We hire 6-7 new nurses every 3-4 months (very large NICU).

    http://allnurses.com/nicu-nursing-neonatal/how-to-become-1035945.html

  • May 18

    We have an "Unplanned Etubation" form. We don't pass blame of who caused it, but what were the circumstances so if there is a pattern or cause (Loose tape or slobbery tape) then it can be addressed. If you have an issue with the security of the ETT, then call RT and get it re-taped. I have not had a baby that self-extubated, but if I did I would definitely push RT under the bus because it has to be their tape job that caused it. I am a super nurse and it can't be my fault.

  • May 18

    For a bag, we would drain the bag (but measure the waste), cosign the waste with a fellow nurse, then waste in the trash, dump the bag (after removing patient identifiers to the shred bin)

  • May 18

    We have special bins for wasting medications. It looks basically like a sharps container and they are next to every sharps containers and there are large ones in the nurses station for bigger items. They are drained into the bin and we have stickers to hide patient's information, and then the container is also placed in the bin. We do this for every medication.

  • May 15

    Exposure to cardiac monitoring, ventilators, arterial lines,PICCs

  • May 15

    If they report you to the BON, you have challenges ahead of you. In Texas, you would be required to participate in TPAPN. I don't know what Oklahoma requires.

    You need some help with coping skills, clearly. Getting help for your anxiety should be right up there with salvaging your career, imo.

    Good luck. This doesn't have to spell the end of your nursing career, but you are going to have to take some bitter medicine in order to keep your license.

  • May 14

    Follow through with the rule and actually fire someone. That will set an example and actually scare them into not calling in for bogus reasons. If they don't comply, then keep firing until you find staff that can be responsible and work their jobs. There are tons of nurses out there looking for jobs and willing to work.

  • May 13

    As a student, it's really not up to you or your comfort level. You will wear gloves during patient care when your school or facility policy mandates. You don't get to choose.


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