Latest Likes For BittyBabyGrower

Latest Likes For BittyBabyGrower

BittyBabyGrower 6,956 Views

Joined Feb 9, '04 - from 'Somewhere in the midwest'. BittyBabyGrower is a Nurse of course!. He has '30+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'NICU, PICU, educator'. Posts: 1,760 (17% Liked) Likes: 891

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • May 30

    We do it. Not everyone signs up for primaries or associates as they like the nomad life lol Most kids have 2 primary nurses, one day and one night with a few associate nurses scattered over the 3 shifts. It is great for our big chronic kids. I like the big chronic kids, so I will associate them when they are older.

  • May 27

    All of the big hospitals here, including the Children's hospitals, are mostly 50% rotation with straight evenings or nights as an option. My hospital offers a minimal day rotation (25%) for people with 20-25 years in and no rotation after 25 as one of the seniority perks. Our day shifts are hard to come by, usually having to wait until someone retires, quits or transfers out, and then it goes by seniority or to an internal transfer.


    The other hospitals also require on call time per month.

    If if you want to specialize, it may not be a day position and even if you transfer you may have to work an off shift for a while.

    And even some of the "straight" day positions really aren't if there are still patients to be seen or longer office hours or unforeseen problems cropping up that push things back. Many of these areas may require on call also, such as OR, radiology, dialysis, cath lab etc.

    Just concentrate on getting thru school and see what happens. Having clinicals on off hours will kind of give you a taste of what it will be like.

    Good luck!

    And and to the people asking why they would get out on an off shift, make sure the wording in your contract doesn't say something along the lines of you may be rotated or placed on other shifts based on unit needs. That is the loophole many places have.

  • May 26

    Have to do what you have to do, but I wouldn't tell my co-workers why I called off, especially if they work the same kind of rotations.

    We had one scheduler that would schedule you 7p-7a on Saturday and rotate you back to days on Monday 7a-7p. Talk about brutal.

  • May 25

    All of the big hospitals here, including the Children's hospitals, are mostly 50% rotation with straight evenings or nights as an option. My hospital offers a minimal day rotation (25%) for people with 20-25 years in and no rotation after 25 as one of the seniority perks. Our day shifts are hard to come by, usually having to wait until someone retires, quits or transfers out, and then it goes by seniority or to an internal transfer.


    The other hospitals also require on call time per month.

    If if you want to specialize, it may not be a day position and even if you transfer you may have to work an off shift for a while.

    And even some of the "straight" day positions really aren't if there are still patients to be seen or longer office hours or unforeseen problems cropping up that push things back. Many of these areas may require on call also, such as OR, radiology, dialysis, cath lab etc.

    Just concentrate on getting thru school and see what happens. Having clinicals on off hours will kind of give you a taste of what it will be like.

    Good luck!

    And and to the people asking why they would get out on an off shift, make sure the wording in your contract doesn't say something along the lines of you may be rotated or placed on other shifts based on unit needs. That is the loophole many places have.

  • May 25

    All of the big hospitals here, including the Children's hospitals, are mostly 50% rotation with straight evenings or nights as an option. My hospital offers a minimal day rotation (25%) for people with 20-25 years in and no rotation after 25 as one of the seniority perks. Our day shifts are hard to come by, usually having to wait until someone retires, quits or transfers out, and then it goes by seniority or to an internal transfer.


    The other hospitals also require on call time per month.

    If if you want to specialize, it may not be a day position and even if you transfer you may have to work an off shift for a while.

    And even some of the "straight" day positions really aren't if there are still patients to be seen or longer office hours or unforeseen problems cropping up that push things back. Many of these areas may require on call also, such as OR, radiology, dialysis, cath lab etc.

    Just concentrate on getting thru school and see what happens. Having clinicals on off hours will kind of give you a taste of what it will be like.

    Good luck!

    And and to the people asking why they would get out on an off shift, make sure the wording in your contract doesn't say something along the lines of you may be rotated or placed on other shifts based on unit needs. That is the loophole many places have.

  • May 23

    Perfect example of why you should fill out an incident report or patient safety report every single time you don't have the needed equipment available and documenting what you said to the patient and what they replied to you.

    If if they want alarms on all these patients then they have to provide them. Enough incident reports of missing equipment will get noticed pretty fast by legal.

  • May 21

    We always have a vial in
    the narc fridge that pharmacy has diluted to 5mcg/ml. We
    never give straight. We push the amount into our med tubing if it is under the 0.3ml amount and out the flush of 1ml over 5 minutes. If it is a larger amount we put the med on the pump for 3-5 minutes and then a flush at the same rate for another 3-5 minutes.

  • May 21

    Quote from mechai44
    I think it's important, too, to consider those patients who are AAOx3 but are impulsive whether from a concept of wanting to move their inpatient stay along by doing more, trying to do more because they feel better, or impulse control issues related to a disease state or other condition. I've had patients on the inpatient rehab unit where I work who are exactly that. They answer all of the questions perfectly throughout the entire shift but dink around when it comes to impulsivity. Good luck with this issue. I wonder if printing all of these responses out and taking it to HR would help at all?
    Don't print anything or take it anywhere!!! That will get you in hot water if they feel there is enough identifying info to figure out this is about your place of employment!!

  • May 21

    Perfect example of why you should fill out an incident report or patient safety report every single time you don't have the needed equipment available and documenting what you said to the patient and what they replied to you.

    If if they want alarms on all these patients then they have to provide them. Enough incident reports of missing equipment will get noticed pretty fast by legal.

  • May 21

    Perfect example of why you should fill out an incident report or patient safety report every single time you don't have the needed equipment available and documenting what you said to the patient and what they replied to you.

    If if they want alarms on all these patients then they have to provide them. Enough incident reports of missing equipment will get noticed pretty fast by legal.

  • May 20

    My guess is you will have to pay. It isn't like you are being deployed.

  • May 18

    Quote from mechai44
    I think it's important, too, to consider those patients who are AAOx3 but are impulsive whether from a concept of wanting to move their inpatient stay along by doing more, trying to do more because they feel better, or impulse control issues related to a disease state or other condition. I've had patients on the inpatient rehab unit where I work who are exactly that. They answer all of the questions perfectly throughout the entire shift but dink around when it comes to impulsivity. Good luck with this issue. I wonder if printing all of these responses out and taking it to HR would help at all?
    Don't print anything or take it anywhere!!! That will get you in hot water if they feel there is enough identifying info to figure out this is about your place of employment!!

  • May 18

    Perfect example of why you should fill out an incident report or patient safety report every single time you don't have the needed equipment available and documenting what you said to the patient and what they replied to you.

    If if they want alarms on all these patients then they have to provide them. Enough incident reports of missing equipment will get noticed pretty fast by legal.

  • May 17

    We have had Neuro kids go home elevated. Our OT/PT set up some sort of wedge for them.

    As we all know, there is always an exception to every rule. Neuro kids, trached kids are just a few.

  • May 16

    They way you worded it is what leads us to believe this is homework

    . What is the usual amount to be give? What do blood protocols tell you, how are platelets ordered? How big and old is the infant? What have you looked up?
    So...would you clarify?


close
close